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ePub A Path for Kindred Spirits: The Friendship of Clarence Stein and Benton MacKaye download

by Robert L. McCullough

ePub A Path for Kindred Spirits: The Friendship of Clarence Stein and Benton MacKaye download
Author:
Robert L. McCullough
ISBN13:
978-1930066939
ISBN:
1930066937
Language:
Publisher:
Center for American Places (July 15, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Architecture
ePub file:
1153 kb
Fb2 file:
1806 kb
Other formats:
mobi azw mbr docx
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
274

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109 pages : 24 cm. Throughout history friendships between great thinkers have provided the basis for philosophical exchange. Despite different backgrounds, Stein and MacKaye's belief that the betterment of society lay in its connection to the natural world fueled their dialogue and resulted in their most ambitious projects - MacKaye's plan for the Appalachian Trail and Stein's plan for Radburn, New Jersey.

By Robert L. McCullough. A Path For Kindred Spirits The Friendship Of Clarence Stein And Benton. Robert L.

Other founding members included Lewis Mumford and Benton MacKaye . The Writings of Clarence S. Stein: Architect of the Planned Community, 1998.

Other founding members included Lewis Mumford and Benton MacKaye; the RPAA helped MacKaye develop his vision for what would become the Appalachian Trail From 1923 to 1926 Stein served as chairman for the New York State Housing and Regional Planning Commission Personal life. Toward New Towns for America, 1951. Kitimat: A New City, 1954.

Libraries News Design Library. New books received in November. M38 2012 A Path for Kindred Spirits : the friendship of Clarence Stein and Benton MacKaye. U52 E Eichler : modernism rebuilds the American dream. A2 L56 2012 Opening Ceremony. V53 H48 2002 Hexstatic : rewind dvd. NA736. H56 A4 2012 Steven Holl : volume 2 : 1999-2012. P56 2012 Speaking Ruins : Piranesi, architects, and antiquity in eighteenth-century Rome.

We mix the best of a book club and a speakeasy, with a twist of creativity.

Clarence Samuel Stein (June 19, 1882 – February 7, 1975) was an American urban planner, architect, and writer, a major proponent of the Garden City movement in the United States. in The Architecture and the Gardens of the San Diego Exposition: a pictorial survey of the aesthetic features of the Panama California international exposition.

Throughout history friendships between great thinkers have provided the basis for philosophical exchange. Such was the case with Clarence Stein and Benton MacKaye, conservationists and architects, who in the early twentieth century found their shared inspiration in nature. Despite diverse backgrounds, Stein and MacKaye’s belief that the betterment of society lay in its connection to the natural world fueled their dialogue and resulted in their most ambitious projects—MacKaye’s plan for the Appalachian Trail and Stein’s plan for Radburn, New Jersey. In Radburn, Stein and fellow architect Henry Wright used “superblocks” and cul-de-sacs to create a personal, self-contained community in the midst of a larger, impersonal city setting. Similarly, MacKaye’s Appalachian Trail allows people to easily access nature, blurring the line between the industrialized and natural worlds.Robert L. McCullough offers a detailed account of Stein and MacKaye’s personal struggles and public triumphs during several tumultuous decades in American history that encompassed both the Depression and World War II. Using numerous primary resources, including MacKaye’s hand-drawn maps of the American countryside and the pair’s affectionate letters to each other, McCullough demonstrates Stein and MacKaye’s painstaking commitment to their professional careers and their friendship. Arguing that their work would be not as well-rounded—or as well-received—if Stein and MacKaye had not supported and encouraged each other’s respective projects, McCullough solidifies their legacy not only as great American visionaries, but also as caring friends.