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ePub Lost New York download

by Nathan Silver

ePub Lost New York download
Author:
Nathan Silver
ISBN13:
978-0805203288
ISBN:
0805203281
Language:
Publisher:
Schocken Books; First PB Edition, First Printing edition (January 1971)
Category:
Subcategory:
Architecture
ePub file:
1827 kb
Fb2 file:
1181 kb
Other formats:
mobi rtf azw rtf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
706

The original version of Silver's ode to New York City's architectural ghosts was compiled almost forty years ago, so. .

It definitely belongs on the bookshelf of anyone with an interest in the modern history of Manhattan. Published on February 10, 2004.

Nathan Silver is an architect, teacher, critic, and the author of several books on architecture

Nathan Silver is an architect, teacher, critic, and the author of several books on architecture. He lived in New York for many years before moving to London. It definitely belongs on the bookshelf of anyone with an interest in the modern history of Manhattan.

Nathan Silver, Lost New York. New York: Weathervane Books, 1967, p. 144. This article about a church or other Christian place of worship in Manhattan is a stub. php?title Jones Chapel (New York City)&oldid 932975204". Categories: Churches in Manhattan.

NATHAN SILVER'S outraged threnody ''Lost New York'' (1967) moved New Yorkers wounded by the losses of Penn Station and other landmarks. But by the time the book came out Mr. Silver had moved to England, and he missed the last three decades of preservation protests and progress. Mr. Silver was born in New York in 1936; his father, Isaac, an architect, taught engineering drafting at Stuyvesant High School, and his grandfather, Nathan, ran Silver's,.

New York : Schocken Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Nathan Silver is an architect, teacher, critic, and the author of several books on architecture. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное. Библиографические данные. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2000. 0618054758, 9780618054756.

Lost New York appeared at the beginning of a popular wave of feeling about the past that was driven largely by the belief that modern architects, left to their own devices, would create unlivable cities. The Landmarks Preservation Law had been passed in New York a year earlier, creating the city’s first official body charged with saving historic structures.

AUTHOR: Silver, Nathan. TITLE: Lost New York. ACCEPTABLE - May have major wear and tear. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Will not be for the collector or suitable as a present unless hard to find elsewhere. Read full description.

Book by Nathan Silver
  • This book is wonderful, illustrating with many photos the iconic buildings of old NY. Most of these structures were long ago demolished, so all we have left are memories (if you are old enough) and the photos in this book.

  • love this book!

  • interesting! very full book of photos. nice for the guest room .

  • great

  • ok

  • The original version of Silver's ode to New York City's architectural ghosts was compiled almost forty years ago, so it's nice that this revised edition was released in 2000, with a ton of new photos and revised text. It definitely belongs on the bookshelf of anyone with an interest in the modern history of Manhattan. That said, the book is very poorly designed and would benefit from a total makeover. The photo size and placement follow no discernable grid or system, and the text and photos often don't match up, forcing the reader to flip back and forth. More annoyingly, there's no standard system for captioning or dating the photos, except for an "Illustrations and Sources" section at the back. So, I read this book with one finger permanently stuck in the back so I could flip back and forth to get a sense of the eras I was looking at -- very cumbersome. It also would have been really nice to have a map at the front with the photos matched to it. While the photos are obviously archival, the reproductions seem curiously flat and fuzzy. This may be due to the uncoated natural paper the book was printed on, but they would benefit from the contrast a bright white paper would provide as well as new scans and some careful retouching work. So, this is a neat book, but could become something really excellent in the hands of a good designer.

  • IF the reviewer below is really Nathan Silver, I congratulate him on the shift of gears from his 1968 version of LOST NEW YORK to this one. (Even if it's not him, I congratulate him anyway.) The first edition was heavy on the preservation/conservation debate while this one is more reflective and personal. In both instances, however, Mr. Silver has made an incredible contribution to the study of New York history--not just its architecture, but to the thinking that went into the creation of these lost structures, and the lack of thinking that destroyed them.
    Like Jane Jacobs, Mr. Silver shares a passion for the city and how its monuments, public buildings and spaces, and private residences have a direct and fortifying effect on its citizens. The photographs are stunning, as is the quality of the printing. Mr. Silver's text is equally powerful and just as relevant. At times the effect of seeing these representations of a lost time, and reading about their ends, can be upsetting; the sense of loss is very powerful. But there is a point to all of it beyond the seeming nostalgia: we had better start appreciating those gems of the past that are still rooted in the schist of Manhattan before they wind up in the next edition of LOST NEW YORK.
    One last note: As rebuilding begins on the site of the World Trade Center (a part of lost New York that wasn't our fault), this book indirectly compels New Yorkers to participate in some forward-thinking. It makes one wonder, not only what was lost to us, but what will we give to future generations?
    Rocco Dormarunno,
    author of THE FIVE POINTS

  • When I moved to New York in the early 1970s, I wound up taking a short course on New York City architecture at NYU School of Continuing Education. The original version of this book was the text. It was excellent on that level, but also great as a coffee table-type book to flip through and enjoy the photos.

    New York is a dynamic city that has rebuilt itself many times. Inevitably, a lot of wonderful architecture has been lost forever. This book is outstanding and it's great to see that the author updated it.