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by Brendan Gill

ePub Many Masks: A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright download
Author:
Brendan Gill
ISBN13:
978-0345356987
ISBN:
0345356985
Language:
Publisher:
Ballantine Books; First Paperback Printing edition (September 12, 1988)
Category:
Subcategory:
Architecture
ePub file:
1409 kb
Fb2 file:
1698 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf azw docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
808

While visiting family in Ireland and England, I finally finished Brendan Gill's, Many Masks: A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright.

While visiting family in Ireland and England, I finally finished Brendan Gill's, Many Masks: A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright was, of course, a true American genius but as was noted by one acerbic critic, a bit like PT. Barnum.

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) is often described as the greatest of American architects has been added to your Cart.

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867–1959) is often described as the greatest of American architects. His works-among them Taliesin North has been added to your Cart. Brendan Gill's writing is always sophisticated and utterly charming.

Brendan Gill's writing is always sophisticated and utterly charming. Nowhere is that more evident than in this treasure of a biography of the man who - not without good reason - styled himself as America's greatest architect.

Authors: Brendan Gill. Many Masks: Life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Title: Many Masks: Life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Condition: Used; Good. Publish Date: 30/08/1988.

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a life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Published 1987 by Putnam in New York. Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959).

Bibliographic Details. Title: MANY MASKS: A LIFE OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT. The author profiles the professional achievements and flamboyant personal life of his long-time friend and preeminent American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Publisher: G. P. Putnam's Sons. Publication Date: 1987. About the Author: Brendan Gill (1914–1997) was a staff writer for theNew Yorker for over sixty years.

Many Masks: A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Some critics have panned this 1987 biography by Brendan Gill, longtime writer for The New Yorker magazine

Many Masks: A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright. Some critics have panned this 1987 biography by Brendan Gill, longtime writer for The New Yorker magazine. Nevertheless, Gill's book is entertaining, an easy read, and it includes fascinating quotes from Wright's autobiography and other sources.

The author profiles the professional achievements and flamboyant personal life of his long-time friend and preeminent American architect Frank Lloyd Wright
  • The Story of Frank Lloyd Wright has been told many times. Aside from his many biographers he is also the inspiration of a well known book and hilarious (unintentionally, though) movie, The Fountainhead. Other than Michaelangelo, I do not know of another architecte who has rated such a treatment.

    Wright's life was heroic and this book is useful in seeing how that came to be. Gill is suited to the task, he not only knew Wright, but wrote the building column in the New Yorker for many years.

    This book is a common sense take on Wright's life. Gill explores many of the myths that Wright constructed around his life and finds that Wright's creative powers were not always expended in the direction of his buildings. Wright was a genius who did not feel the slightest need to conceal this fact from the world. He was also a visionary who took the Eurpean architecture of its day and transformed it into the American vernacular. This feat he conttrasts strongly with Beaux Arts school which merely transplanted these European fads. Wright was a real original

    The book is lavishly illustrated since all of Gills writing does not give the same feel for Wright's genious as a hangful of these images provide. I think that were it possible color photographs might have provided a clearer view.

    As Gill demonstrates, Wright at times could be a rascal, but he was also a genius even when when all of the artifice of his life is stripped away. This book is a welcomed addition to Wright biographical scholarship.

  • I have felt enlightened of Frank Lloyd Wright from reading the book. I knew of F.Ll.W. back in my teenage years (1953, etc.). I saw the V.C. Morriss Shop (San Francisco) in 1954. To read the book is surely bringing more of a detailed explanation of who he was. It has put air & blood in the individual of whom I have seen his pictures many times. I've thought of how many homes that he's designed that I have been in (5)--I've stayed overnight in one--I had a friend whose family had a home that was designed by him. I'm going to try to see his home in Spring Green next year (2016).

    J.H. Marshall

  • "Who was that masked man?" As answered by author Gill, at various times an architectural genius who could shake a groundbreaking concept out of his sleeve, a supreme egotist, an unctuous charmer who bamboozled clients into spending more than they had budgeted, a procrastinator, a supreme manipulator of the media and a family-wrecker. America's (self-anointed) King of Architects wore many masks, many of them unflattering. Gill's well-researched biography ends up prompting the reader to ask whether the artistic ends that Wright achieved justified the means that he employed in bringing his creations to life.

    Gill does a fine job explaining Wright's objectives at Taliesin North and West, Fallingwater, the Guggenheim Museum, Beth Sholom temple and at other sites. And he laces his work with numerous passages from Wright's correspondence, leaving the reader shaking his head in sympathy with any number of exasperated clients. However, "Many Masks" falls short when discussing the infamous fire at Taliesin North. While the author provides a workmanlike account of the incident, not much is offered in the way of background on the arsonist or his possible motive, leaving the reader to search elsewhere for answers.

    Toward the conclusion, Gill excerpts a hitherto-unpublished statement from one of Wright's sons that drives home the degree to which the "Master's" lifelong shenanigans left some of his loved ones emotionally wounded. It's a moving statement that underscores the scorched-earth approach to living that Wright practiced well into old age, which for this reader ultimately debased the worth of Wright's public accomplishments.

    In summary, "Many Masks" is a finely crafted, sometimes droll and often thought-provoking look at a genuine American Original.

  • A true revelation of FLW

  • Many Masks A Life of Frank Lloyd Wright 1987 paperback

    I haven't finished the book yet, but am finding it very interesting. Since I decided to be an interpreter at a Wright home, I felt I needed to broaden my knowledge of the man and his work. He indeed wore many "masks" and if anyone is interested in FLW this would be on a "must read" list of books about him. The author, Brendan Gill, has done his research and knows the man.

  • One of the best books about the man.

  • The book was not as expected - the detail was overwhelmingly dry for me. It is truly a read for an architect.

  • Brendan Gill's biography fills in the facts before, during and beyond this event, allowing us to get a fuller portrait of the man considered the greatest American Architect of the twentieth century. Gill knew Wright personally and conducted a number of personal interviews with him as well as with his wife and children. He also had access to many of Wright's letters, which he quotes at length.

    Many Masks takes the reader through the main building projects of Lloyd, his relationship with his clients and the final result of his schemes. I say schemes because, as a reviewer said before me Wright was a bit of a mountebank.

    I'll be giving a more thorough [...] but for those of you who want to know if this biography is worht buying. I would say yes, this is an excellent source, but I am interested in reading other biographies to see if they arrive at the same conclusions as Gill. Wright does not come off as such a nice guy, but then he didn't in Drennan's Praire House Murders either. So maybe he wasn't such a nice guy.