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ePub A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder download

by Michael Pollan

ePub A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder download
Author:
Michael Pollan
ISBN13:
978-0747535133
ISBN:
0747535132
Language:
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (March 19, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Architecture
ePub file:
1916 kb
Fb2 file:
1207 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr lit lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
875

Michael Pollan is the author of five books, including In Defense of Food, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and The Botany of. .

Michael Pollan is the author of five books, including In Defense of Food, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and The Botany of Desire, all New York Times bestsellers. A longtime contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine, he is also currently the Knight Professor of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley.

A Place of My Own book. Now Pollan A room of one's own: is there anybody who hasn't at one time or another wished for such a place, hasn't turned those soft words over until they'd assumed a habitable shape?

Thankfully Charlie had taken my own job off the clock several months earlier, after I’d made some noises about the magnitude of the initial design fees. Charlie reached into the rank of pens lining his breast pocket

A place of my own the e.Thankfully Charlie had taken my own job off the clock several months earlier, after I’d made some noises about the magnitude of the initial design fees. Charlie reached into the rank of pens lining his breast pocket. Taking a black Expresso Bold to our smeary copy of the blueprint, he proceeded to demonstrate how he’d arrived at the eight-one dimension, a complex puzzle revolving around the need to keep both the height of the door and the building’s distance from the ground at a bare minimum.

A Place of My Own recounts his two-and-a-half-year journey of discovery in an absorbing narrative that deftly weaves the . Michael Pollan does not leave out any details in building a small house in the woods. The book doesn't overwhelm you exactly; it beats you down until you nearly give up.

A Place of My Own recounts his two-and-a-half-year journey of discovery in an absorbing narrative that deftly weaves the day-to-day work of design and building-from siting to blueprint, from the pouring of foundations to finish carpentry-with reflections on everything form the power of place to shape our lives to the question. of what constitutes "real work" in a technological society.

A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder was Michael Pollan's second book, after Second Nature: A Gardener's Education (1991). In 2008 it was re-released and re-titled as A Place of My Own: The Architecture of Daydreams

A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder was Michael Pollan's second book, after Second Nature: A Gardener's Education (1991). In 2008 it was re-released and re-titled as A Place of My Own: The Architecture of Daydreams. The book begins by outlining how Michael reached the decision to build a "writers house", and to build it himself. The second chapter covers the site selection process.

point in his life, writer Michael Pollan found himself dreaming of a small wood-frame hut in the woods near his . This book is not for everyone.

point in his life, writer Michael Pollan found himself dreaming of a small wood-frame hut in the woods near his house-a place to work, but also a "shelter for daydreams. Weaving the practical with the philosophical, this book presents a captivating personal inquiry into the art of architecture, the craft of building, and the meaning of modern work. Line drawings throughout.

A Place of My Own recounts his two-and-a-half-year journey of discovery in an absorbing narrative that deftly weaves the day-to-day work of design and building - from siting to blueprint, from the pouring of foundations to finish carpentry - with reflections on everything from the power of place to shape our lives to the question of what constitutes "real work" in a technological society. He is the author of two prize-winning books: "Second Nature: A Gardener's Education" and "A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder.

Pollan wanted a building custom-suited to his needs as a writer, beginning with the site itself. He found pertinent advice in the works of 18th-century writers such as Pope, Walpole, and Addison, but also made serious study of feng shui, a Chinese art of spiritual landscape. He settled on a site next to a large bolder, overlooking his house and pond. An engrossing, charming enterprise, but after all his poetic waxing for ""a place of solitude a few steps off the beaten track,"" Pollan inexplicably denies himself and the reader a payoff passage that finds him comfortably seated at desk, pen in hand, ready for writing.

A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder was Michael Pollan's second book, after Second Nature . Michael Pollan is an American author, journalist, activist, and the Lewis K. Chan Arts Lecturer and Professor of Practice of Non-Fiction at Harvard University. Pollan is also professor of journalism at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Second Nature: A Gardener's Education was Michael Pollan's first book. It is a collection of essays about gardening arranged by seasons.

Michael Pollan eBook Online Read. A Place of My Own: The Education of an Amateur Builder. Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation. Author: Michael Pollan. Published Year: 2013 Science FictionHistory & Fiction. How to Change Your Mind. Published Year: 2018 Science FictionHistory & Fiction. Published Year: 1997 History & Fiction.

Michael Pollan dreamt of a small, wood-frame hut in the woods near his house. This is the story of his fulfilling that dream, from siting the blueprint, to the pouring of the foundations. It explores the way we invest a space with meaning, to what constitutes "real work" in today's society.
  • This book is not for everyone. Michael Pollan does not leave out any details in building a small house in the woods. The book doesn't overwhelm you exactly; it beats you down until you nearly give up. If you don't surrender, and if you have any interest at all in learning how to do something you know nothing about, and if you care about doing something right, you need to read almost anything by Michael Pollan. I fell under his spell with his opening salvos in "The Omnivores Dilemma," a book that helped start a revolution in food quality and that leads to the corruption that begins with factory farming clear through sales and promotion excesses to the grocery stores and pretended government oversight. I don't think it is overblown to write that some Americans and possibly myself would be in a nursing home or six feet under except for Pollan. So if you are planning or just thinking about building something and want it to stand the test of time, read "A Place of My Own." Actually, you can learn a lot from Pollan whether you are going to build anything or not. There is a way of looking at things that may be in decline today but that can result in infinite value. Pollan can show you how to do this. Also, you can join me in wondering why he didn't show us a photo of the completed structure.

  • Pollan drives nails. Nice memoir of building a private writer's space.
    I do like his skewering of the modern and pos-modern architects. As he seems to have some especial scorn for Philip Johnson, I recall reading elsewhere that Johnson was notorious for never designing a window that didn't leak.
    And irony of ironies, Pollan found himself confronted with inadequate construction drawings of the windows, and an architect with no real idea of how to design an inward-opening awning window that didn't inherently leak. One thing that does stand out, from a perspective of years after the project was completed was that Mr. Pollan and his architect put a higher value on the visual and aural aesthetics of an uninsulated shingle roof than on the winter habitability of the workspace.

  • An interesting premise of the building a "writing shed" for the author. The details and thoughts that actually involved this part were fascinating and certainly well written. On the other hand, the loong wanders off into the obscurities of architectural philosophy were not for me.

  • I remember in high school hearing about the eccentricities of Walden and rolling my eyes. This book has helped me see why that book has held such a strong place in the zeitgeist... and yes, makes me want to build my own little place in the woods.

    I really appreciated how Pollan went into some of the architectural history and theory - although at one point I just wanted to shout at him to just get up off of his duff and DO something rather than reading about doing something! And then only a few paragraphs later, he made fun of himself for that very thing, and went and actually started with the doing. Pretty handy, that! Wish it always worked that way for me, the things I could do...

    The book really has 3 main characters - his architect friend/mentor, his contractor/mentor, and Pollan. The book spends an awful lot of time on the struggle between architects and contractors, and Pollan's place stuck between the two of them... and his gradual acquisition of knowledge and confidence, which allows him to make decisions outside of the blueprints.

    I read this book on audiobook, so it was solidly built out of imagination. I imagine that the book itself has drawings or illustrations - and see, even just looking at the cover shows me what the finished product looks like, and darn that little hut looks cute and snug! - which would help give it shape mentally... but actually that may have helped me a bit. I rewound and relistened in some parts to try to figure out what he meant when describing building details, and I don't know that I would have thought so hard about it if it had been diagrammed.

    That said, is this the Omnivore's Dilemma? Nope, not by a long shot. But if I had never read OD, I'd have given it 5 stars, so that's what I'm doing here. (maybe OD should get an imaginary 6th star, to make it fair to every other book?)

    This was just a really enjoyable book, and it's subtly altered how I look at buildings around me. Worth the reading, definitely.

  • This book will very much appeal to the DIY crowd because we've all faced the dilemmas that Mike does...from idea, to planning, tools and searching for competent advice and help. Self-effacing humor is Mike's key to the door to his 'place.' As an avid planner and builder in my spare time, I enjoyed all the foibles and fables that unfold as the plot becomes a place.