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ePub The Great American Paperback : An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book download

by Richard A. Lupoff

ePub The Great American Paperback : An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book download
Author:
Richard A. Lupoff
ISBN13:
978-1888054507
ISBN:
1888054506
Language:
Publisher:
Collectors Pr; 1st American ed edition (July 24, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Graphic Design
ePub file:
1243 kb
Fb2 file:
1868 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf rtf mbr
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
983

The Great American Paperback book. A little book appeared in drugstores and on newsstands that would fit into the jacket pocket of an ordinary person.

The Great American Paperback book. There was no real binding, no dust jacket, just a colorful, laminated cover. It was an experiment, and the pocket book was born. From the glittering images of square-jawed cowboys to the gritty s Few realized in 1938 that a revolution was about to take place.

The Great American Paperback : An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book. by Richard A. Lupoff. It's an overwhelmingly great book about a fascinating era of American publishing. Lupoff covers artists and writers well-known and unknown. There's a surprise on every page and visual treasure upon treasure. We've been waiting for this book from writer and fan Dick Lupoff since we first heard of it. The main complaint we have is "it's not big enough" but then, readers would need a forklift to look at i. his is a major undertaking; the Collectors Press folks have once again done a fine job here. The colors and layout work very well.

The Great American Paperback illustrates in glorious full color more than 600 of the most interesting and .

The Great American Paperback illustrates in glorious full color more than 600 of the most interesting and collectable paperbacks, each with an informative caption that provides as much fascinating anecdotal information as the text, which is a masterly and scholarly history of the American paperback, tracing its roots to the early 19th century and concluding with a look at the future

com's Richard A. Lupoff Author Page. The Great American Paperback : An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book Jul 24, 2001.

com's Richard A.

During the peak period of comic book Good Girl Art, the 1940s to the 1950s, leading artists of the movement included Bill Ward (for . Lupoff, Richard A. (2001). The Great American Paperback: An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book (1st American e.

During the peak period of comic book Good Girl Art, the 1940s to the 1950s, leading artists of the movement included Bill Ward (for his Torchy) and Matt Baker, who was one of the few African Americans working as an artist during the Golden Age of Comics. Today, Baker's rendition of Phantom Lady is considered a collectors item, and much of his GGA is sought after. During this period, GGA also found its way into newspaper comic strips. Portland, Oregon: Collectors Press.

Richard A. Lupoff defined good girl art as: A cover illustration depicting an attractive young woman, usually in. The Great American Paperback: An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book (1st. American e. Portland, O. Collectors Pr. Lupoff defined good girl art as: A cover illustration depicting an attractive young woman, usually in skimpy or form-fitting clothing, and designed for erotic stimulation YouTube Encyclopedic.

James B. Johnson’s The Last American is fighting to preserve the memory of the old . Twelve great reads by a dozen great writers!

James B. Don Webb, in his fascinating tale, The Five Biographies of General Gerrhan, demonstrates how easy it is for the professional writer to (mis)interpret, deliberately or otherwise, the story of a space hero. Twelve great reads by a dozen great writers! Sci-fi & Fantasy.

The Great American Paperback: An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book, by Richard A. Lupoff, (br) Locus Jan 2002. Horror of the 20th Century: An Illustrated History, by Robert E. Weinberg, (br) Locus Dec 2000. The Green Man: Tales from the Mythic Forest, by Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling, (br) Locus Sep 2002. Greetings From Earth: The Art of Bob Eggleton, by Nigel Suckling, (br) Locus Jun 2000. The Horse and The Iron Ball, by Jerry Allan & Georgiana Allan, (br) Locus Dec 2000.

Lupoff, Richard A. The Great American Paperback: An Illustrated Tribute to Legends of the Book. Illustrated book-length study on origins of cheesecake art to the present. Collectors Press, 2001. 2010Hogan's Alley"Not Seen but Not Forgotten: The Invisible Scarlet O’Neil," References. Interview with artist Richard Bassford on Wally Wood and Good Girl Art. CFA-APA 40 (Spring, 1996), publication of the Comic & Fantasy Art Amateur Press Association. Cheesecake and the Art of the Pin-UpJim Burrows: Jim Burrows: "Strong Women in Comics.

Personal Name: Lupoff, Richard . 1935-. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Chronicles the growth of the paperback industry from its 19th century forerummers to its glory days of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.
  • Note: I made some immature person angry by giving negative reviews to books attempting to "prove the Book of Mormon." Rather than answer my criticisms, this person, who feels threatened by the facts, gives my reviews negative votes. Oh, well.

    Your helpful votes are appreciated, and please remember that a short review (or recommendation) can still be good if it leads you to a good book.

    I've enjoyed thumbing through this book many times. It has a bunch of scantily clad females (racy in the old days, but quaint today), and they are either in crimes stories or characters in science-fiction stories.

    I'll just list some great covers:
    Page 26: "Dracula"--this cover shows Dracula creeping up to a sleeping blond woman--amusing.
    Page 113: "Revolt of the Triffids" has a city scene with a strange green plant attacking a woman, whose blouse revealing.
    Page 208: "Beyond the Farthest Star." This cover by an Edgar Rice Burroughs story shows a cat-like creature looking through an opening in a jungle at some astronauts who have crashed in their strange airplane.
    Page 135: This cover is over the top. It shows a green-faced man smoking a "Marihuana" cigarette. Under the cigarette is a woman lying down in her purple dress. "A cheap and evil girl sets a hopped-up killer against a city."

    Oh, for the good-old days of paperback covers!
    I would recommend buying a used copy. You'll enjoy it.

  • This is an awesome book that combines the scholarship of essential but out-of-print references such as Kenneth Davis' "Two-Bit Culture" and Piet Schreuders' "Paperbacks, U.S.A." with the coffee-table art book quality of Lee Server's "Over My Dead Body." In the latter category especially, "The Great American Paperback" reigns supreme. No other book on vintage paperbacks comes close to this level of production values; the nearest comparisons in quality would be books like Frank Robinson's "Science Fiction of the 20th Century" or Vincent Di Fate's "Infinite Worlds."
    A few minor quibbles: Sometimes the saturated colors of the backgrounds interfere with the readability of the text; groupings of cover art within sections should have been more carefully thought out; the index is weak. But these complaints are miniscule indeed compared to the overall value. Collectors Press has produced a 320-page, full color, oversized feast of great paperback art from the modest beginnings in the 1930s through the sleaze and cheese of the mid-1960s. Just about all of the best vintage paperback artists are represented.
    Author Richard Lupoff draws upon the expertise of well-known luminaries such as Gary Lovisi, Rose Idlet, Bill Pronzini, Charles Brown and others. He also brings into play his considerable personal history of working with some of the top publishers in the field, including Ian Ballantine and Donald Wollheim. Lupoff reaches back to the pre-Pocket Books beginnings of paperback publishing, tracing the history of the industry through its trends, its artists, and its major houses. Avon, Dell, Bantam, Gold Medal, Popular Library, Ballantine, and Ace all merit special sections.
    "The Great American Paperback" is a must-buy for any serious paperback collector or student of popular culture. The rarity of many of the paperbacks pictured here guarantee that, in most cases, you'll never see the real thing and certainly not in the condition pictured. Well worth the price of admission!

  • Richard Lupoff's colorful book is rather stunning at first glance but the more I look at it the more I see serious flaws.

    The presentation is too overwhelming. Several colors are used for the background of the pages and these mostly overpower the covers. These strong colors mean that some pages have white text which becomes tiring to read, especially tiny capital letter caption type.

    The overlapping of nearly all the covers was really annoying, in some cases one cover obscures just too much of another cover. A similar book, 'Jackets Required' by Steven Heller and Seymour Chwast has 270 covers (thankfully printed on white paper) none of which overlap and it is lovely to look at.

    As far as I can see there is no meaningful sequence to the covers, they are not shown by genre, year of publication, artist or publisher.

    The index is weak. This is a book collectors will use and I would expect an index to the 600 covers shown, possibly even an artist index, too. I wonder if the lack of a proper index is because at least a third of the pages have no number! The longest run I found was seven pages (58-64) but mostly it is runs of three or four pages through the book. Should buyers really have to put up with this?

    Another reviewer has noted how disappointing this book was, I agree, not because of what Lupoff has to say but because of the poor editorial production. The author probably had nothing to do with this. I still prefer 'Paperbacks USA' by Piet Schruders, a fascinating graphic history of the paperback, Lupoff says it 'is a landmark of paperback scholarship...'.

  • I received "The Great American Paperback" as a Christmas gift and hardly a week goes by that I don't dip into it. It's an overwhelmingly great book about a fascinating era of American publishing. Lupoff covers artists and writers well-known and unknown. There's a surprise on every page and visual treasure upon treasure. The text is equally interesting as Lupoff tells the stories behind the publishers, but it's clearly the book covers themselves that take center stage here. The layout (which sometimes presents covers slightly overlapping other covers) might have been improved, but overall the images are bright, sharp and big. Very few thumbnail views here. I for one hope we'll one day get to see a "Great American Paperback Volume 2" because as good as this one is, there's enough stuff out there to easily fill a second volume. Buy this book without reservation. If you have any love of Americana in general and pulp/paperbacks in particular, you'll fall in love with this book.