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ePub Kokopelli Ceremonies download

by Robert B. Montoya,Stephen W. Hill

ePub Kokopelli Ceremonies download
Author:
Robert B. Montoya,Stephen W. Hill
ISBN13:
978-1885772060
ISBN:
1885772068
Language:
Publisher:
Kiva; 1st edition (January 1, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1803 kb
Fb2 file:
1629 kb
Other formats:
mbr rtf doc lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
172

Kokopelli Ceremonies contains the following sections: Introduction: Discusses the author's inspirations for his book and .

Kokopelli Ceremonies contains the following sections: Introduction: Discusses the author's inspirations for his book and his passion for the "archetypal" ancient flute player, a trickster hero that captures humanity-even today.

Kokopelli Ceremonies book. Stephen Hill, Robert Montoya (Illustrator).

1. Kokopelli Ceremonies. Stephen W. Hill, Robert B. Montoya, Robert B. Montoya (Illustrator). Published by Kiva Pub Inc (1995). ISBN 10: 188577205X ISBN 13: 9781885772053.

Images on this site are for educational purposes only. Robert Montoya - Sun Father Kokopelli. Other Native Artwork from Gallery 3. AA Naha - Anaktsina Ceremony. Tom Perkinson - Spirit Figures Ascending. Tony Abeyta - Nights Emergence.

THe fame of Kokopelli, the Humpbacked Flute Player of the Southwest, has spread worldwide

THe fame of Kokopelli, the Humpbacked Flute Player of the Southwest, has spread worldwide. It is an intellectual as well as a visual pursuit.

The Ceremonies are an American rock band from Los Angeles, California. The Ceremonies’ sound has been described as ‘80s New Wave nostalgia meets cutting-edge alternative rock. The three members, brothers Matthew R Cook (age 25), Mark N Cook (age 22), and Michael B Cook (age 22), formed the band in 2010. They did not, however, release any music until late 2012. Used to be managed by Troy Carter (Lady Gaga, John Legend).

Introduction by. Robert Wayne Mirabal I bought this book for my boyfriend who always liked the Kokopelli and wanted to know detailed information about the native icon and his past. Robert Wayne Mirabal. I bought this book for my boyfriend who always liked the Kokopelli and wanted to know detailed information about the native icon and his past. This is a great book about the Kokopelli as it is very informative.

Kokopelli is a fertility deity, usually depicted as a humpbacked flute player (often with feathers or antenna-like protrusions on his head), who is venerated by some Native American cultures in the Southwestern United States. Like most fertility deities, Kokopelli presides over both childbirth and agriculture. He is also a trickster god and represents the spirit of music.

"THe fame of Kokopelli, the Humpbacked Flute Player of the Southwest, has spread worldwide. Formally known mainly to anthropologists and ethnologists who discovered his image painted and etched on rock faces..."
  • I purchased this based on what the other reviewers were saying about it, and each of their reviews appear to be spot on for what they are describing about the book. This is the kind of book that one has to visit several time to gain full appreciation for its content and messages. It is an intellectual as well as a visual pursuit.

    The book's text and design are quiet nice, so it is a comfortable as well as informative read. Eyeglass wearers should have no trouble reading the passages or studying the images, which are all clearly rendered and well-spaced. I like the little dancing Kokopelli decorative bars at the top of each primary page. They give the book a sprinkle of light-hearted joy and sense of movement.

    Kokopelli Ceremonies contains the following sections:

    Introduction: Discusses the author's inspirations for his book and his passion for the "archetypal" ancient flute player, a trickster hero that captures humanity--even today.

    Wellsprings of Creativity: Discusses the author's views about the creative human urge, Western culture, and Native American Art. He also ponders the vast appeal of Native American themes.

    The Enigma of Kokopelli: Discusses the universal recognition of the flute-player in various cultures and his possible interpretations. The author describes Kokopelli's roles as a trader, gambler, minstrel, hunter, warrior, god, priest, sacred musician, medicine man, insect, fertility symbol, and petroglyphic cultural sign.

    Robert Montoya, Pueblo Painter: Introduces the artist, his background and his influences. The author discusses his own collection of the artist's efforts.

    Spirituality in the Painting of Robert B. Montoya: Discusses the artist's works and favored themes. The section includes some interesting images like "Deer Night Sky" and "Emergence from Blue Lake." My favorite piece from this section is "We See Yet Do Not Understand," which depicts humanity's search for cosmic understanding, spiritual growth, universal connections, balance, and harmony. I love the rain bird pottery bowl that is in the center of this image and the ladder that stretches to the heavens. Actually, the more you look into this image, the more you can see and feel. [This painting could be the foundation an interesting class discussion in a college humanities and / or psychology class.]

    Kokopelli Ceremonies: Offers an interesting collection of pictures to ponder and guiding commentary to consider. My favorites are "Kokopell's Sunrise Song," Kokopelli's Gift to the Sun," "Kokopelli's Sacred Prayers," and "Arrow Priest."

    A Kokopelli Bibliography: Offers a huge selection of resources for further exploration.

    About the Author & About the Illustrator: More information about this book and its creators.

    Overall, I am pleased with the book. The experience of it is refreshing, and I will definitely keep it in my library for future gazing and enjoyment.

  • this book is presents a novel collection of ceremonies and activities. It is an interesting read, but written on about a third grade level.

  • The figure of Kokopelli is found chipped into desert stone at various ancient sites throughout the American Southwest. It also appears in contemporary forms, painted on canvas, etched into glassware, printed on Christmas cards, and sculpted into candelabra, in presentations that range from the holy to the kitschy. What energizes the frequent appearances of the enigmatic hunchbacked flute player? The authors suggest that the centuries-old drawing power of this archetypal figure may lie in both its protean nature and its spiritual origins.
    Hill acquaints the reader with images of Kokopelli as hunter, warrior, healer, gambler, fertility bringer, and even mythological insect who appears in some Native American accounts of the Creation, by presenting a broad review of the available literature on the topic. Wisely, he presents Kokopelli's multiple manifestations without seeking to narrow them to a definitive representation that would deny the complexity of the image. His smart narrative contains a mine of information that yields a pocketful of nice nuggets with each perusal; and his readable style turns them up without a lot of digging.
    In stunning visual images that complement the text, Montoya presents Kokopelli as an avatar figure who both generously offers and thankfully celebrates the receipt of the gifts of a bountiful earth. To Hill's scholarly analysis, Montoya adds the cultural insights of one steeped in the kind of ceremonialism from which Kokopelli likely first emerged, and the imagination of a skilled contemporary artist. Their collaboration is a complimentary one in which the text illuminates the paintings, and the visual images add an intuitive content that transcends the text.
    Hill is frank about his intention to produce a hybrid text that is concurrently an art book, a study of Native American spiritual beliefs, and a review of Kokopelli literature. The challenge in such an undertaking is to do it seamlessly. How that challenge was met produced my only caveat, and a small one considering the ambitious nature of the project. The book's divisions make it seem a bit episodic, particularly the insertion of a short chapter by art critic James Bialac that might better have been placed in an appendix. At the same time, the holistic approach to the book's subject matter is an essential part of what makes it original and interesting. Hill and Montoya have added an important spiritual component to an art/cultural study without becoming simplistic or sappy, a laudable achievement.
    Kokopelli Ceremonies provides some satisfying depth in an area in which much of the available material only skims the surface. Although the book is brief, it contains a well-selected bibliography for those readers who wish to further pursue the elusive Kokopelli through the avenue of cultural studies. For the text-challenged and those who prefer to see beyond black and white, sixteen gorgeous color plates provide a visual feast. Leave Kokopelli Ceremonies out where you can reach for it often--you'll probably make frequent journeys following the elusive notes of the ancient pied piper.

  • This really is an art critic's comparison and "theoretical development of a character" type of book. It is about Kokopelli and how a particular artist sees his use in ceremonial art of the past. It contains excellent illustrations in color. .