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ePub Fantastic Reality: Louise Bourgeois and a Story of Modern Art (October Books) download

by Mignon Nixon

ePub Fantastic Reality: Louise Bourgeois and a Story of Modern Art (October Books) download
Author:
Mignon Nixon
ISBN13:
978-0262140898
ISBN:
0262140896
Language:
Publisher:
The MIT Press; First Edition edition (May 27, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1739 kb
Fb2 file:
1814 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt txt docx
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
752

In Fantastic Reality, Mignon Nixon not only illuminates the work of this revolutionary artist but rewrites the history of. .

In Fantastic Reality, Mignon Nixon not only illuminates the work of this revolutionary artist but rewrites the history of sculpture in the post-war years. Emphasizing the crucial role played by Kleinean psychoanalysis in Bourgeois' artistic project, Nixon nevertheless maintains her focus on the specific formal qualities of Bourgeois sculptural inventions, drawing us deep into the mysterious sources of the artist's multifarious creation and its relation to the work of her contemporaries.

Fantastic Reality book. The art of Louise Bourgeois stages a dynamic encounter between modern art and psychoanalysis, argues Mignon Nixon in the first full-scale critical study of the artist's work

Fantastic Reality book. The art of Louise Bourgeois stages a dynamic encounter between modern art and psychoanalysis, argues Mignon Nixon in the first full-scale critical study of the artist's work. A pivotal figure in twentieth-century art, Louise Bourgeois (b. 191 A critical study of Louise Bourgeois's art from the 1940s to the 1980s: its departure from surrealism and its dialogue with psychoanalysis.

Fantastic Reality is the detailed story of Louise Bourgeois' fascinating career. much about psychoanalysis as it is about Louise Bourgeois and Modern Art. not a criticism of the book per se, more of Bourgeois’ art and psychoanalysis. This is a fascinating book about a fascinating artist that I would recommend to. both general and specialist readers; just remember though that the book is as. Citations (0). References (0). 1911, France) emigrated to New York in 1938 and is still actively working and exhibiting today.

painting, Western - ▪ art Introduction history of Western painting from its beginnings in prehistoric times to the present. children's literature - Body of written works produced to entertain or instruct young people.

The 2005 book by American professor, art historian, and author of journal October Mignon Nixon is the first and most comprehensive critical study of Louise Bourgeois' work. Nixon’s analysis unfolds in a coordinate system where one axis represents psychoanalysis and the other feminism. From the first chapter the first chapter, dedicated to Bourgeois’ discipleship of Surrealism, Nixon’s narrative starts to resemble a web spun around the artist’s works, and in a way mimicking them.

Author: Nixon, Mignon. Shelf: 70. /NIX/2005. January February March April May June July August September October November December.

Fantastic reality : Louise Bourgeois and a story of modern art, Mignon Nixon. Fantastic reality : Louise Bourgeois and a story of modern art, Mignon Nixon. Title: Fantastic reality : Louise Bourgeois and a story of modern art, Mignon Nixon. Author: Nixon, Mignon.

Like many of MIT's October series of books, this book is thick with brilliant observations, but it requires a deep familiarity with, and care for, the particulars of international modernism, the full sweep of psychoanalysis and the ends of feminist theory.

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The art of Louise Bourgeois stages a dynamic encounter between modern art and psychoanalysis, argues Mignon Nixon in the first full-scale critical study of the artist's work. A pivotal figure in twentieth-century art, Louise Bourgeois (b. 1911, France) emigrated to New York in 1938 and is still actively working and exhibiting today. From Bourgeois's formative struggle with the "father figures" of surrealism, including Andre Breton and Marcel Duchamp, to her galvanizing role in the feminist art movement of the 1970s, to her subsequent emergence as a leading voice in postmodernism, this book explores the artist's responses to war, dislocation, and motherhood, to the predicament of the "woman artist" and the politics of sexual and social liberation, as a dialogue with psychoanalysis.Convinced that she could express "deeper things in three dimensions," Bourgeois abandoned painting for sculpture in the 1940s, founding her art in one of the twentieth century's most radical and controversial accounts of subjectivity, the object relations psychoanalysis of Melanie Klein. Rejecting the Oedipal narratives of Freud and the dream imagery of surrealism for the object world of the infantile drives, Bourgeois turned to the child analysis pioneered by Klein, the figure Julia Kristeva has called "the boldest reformer in the history of modern psychoanalysis." With Klein, Bourgeois thinks the negative -- fragmentation, splitting, and formlessness -- where we might least expect to find it, in the corporeal fantasies of mother and child. This turn to the mother and the death drive at once in child psychoanalysis, Nixon contends, not only finds powerful expression in Bourgeois's art, but is echoed in the work of other artists, including Marcel Duchamp, Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, and Eva Hesse, and in a return to Klein in recent art."Fantastic reality," Bourgeois calls the condition of her art. Starting from Bourgeois's investigation, through a multiplicity of forms and materials, of the problem of subjectivity on the very threshold of emergence, this book argues for a new psychoanalytic story of modern art.

  • I learned so much about one of my favorite artists. Her creativity amazes me and her age when she was still producing.

  • I really wanted to love this book which promises to stage a productive encounter between modernist art, psychoanalysis, and feminism... but then I had to toss it when I read the following sentence: "In Freudian psychoanalysis, the figure of the mother is strangely absent" (p. 4).

    Now the author of this book must surely know that the figure of the mother is absolutely central to Freudian psychoanalysis. Any college freshman knows this, your grandma knows this, and Mignon Nixon definitely knows this. According to Freud's analysis of childhood development, the subject's desire and sense of self emerges in relation to the mother. One could go as far as to claim that, for Freud, subjectivity itself comes into being in relation to the mother. This fact is so widely known that many critics of Freud go to the other extreme and (unfairly) complain that psychoanalysts make treatment revolve entirely around the figure of the mother.

    My question is: Why make an obviously ridiculous assertion in the name of radical anti-Freudian feminism? If one must propose a feminist critique of Freud, then why ground it in such a ridiculous premise? Whatever the merits of Nixon's feminist undertaking, it is discredited from the outset by a series of cheap shots at Freud.