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by Samuel K. Cohn Jr.

ePub The Cult of Remembrance and the Black Death: Six Renaissance Cities in Central Italy download
Author:
Samuel K. Cohn Jr.
ISBN13:
978-0801856068
ISBN:
080185606X
Language:
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press (June 15, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1748 kb
Fb2 file:
1875 kb
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Rating:
4.2
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252

In 1363 the Black Death struck central Italy for the second time . In his award-winning study, Death and Property in Siena, historian Samuel K. Cohn, J. used close analysis of last wills to chart transformations in mentalities over a six-hundred-year history

In 1363 the Black Death struck central Italy for the second time, causing a detectable shift in notions of the afterlife and patterns of charitable giving. Throughout Tuscany and Umbria. used close analysis of last wills to chart transformations in mentalities over a six-hundred-year history. Now, in The Cult of Remembrance and the Black Death, Cohn applies the same methodology to fashion a comparative history of six Italian city-states - Arezzo, Florence, Perugia, Assisi, Pisa, and Siena - showing the rise of a new Renaissance cult of remembrance.

In 1363 the Black Death struck central Italy for the second time .

In 1363 the Black Death struck central Italy for the second time, causing a detectable shift in notions of the afterlife and patterns of charitable giving. In The Cult of Remembrance and the Black Death, he applies the same methods to compare six Italian city-states-Arezzo, Florence, Perugia, Assisi, Pisa, and Siena-showing the rise of a new Renaissance cult of remembrance. But this new cult was not Burckhardt's Renaissance "individualism" tout court.

Cohn, Samuel Kline; American Council of Learned Societies. Canon EOS 5D Mark II. City. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on October 24, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Scholars must first reconsider remembrance itself. His primary assumption is that distributing numerous bequests represents an attempt to erase, or at least ignore, memory. Cohn's thesis of the Cult of Remembrance makes it clear just why Renaissance Individualism never meant a rejection of traditional Christian ideas about death and life. He has challenged Italian historians to reconsider the significance of the transformations that characterize Renaissance Italy.

Six Renaissance Cities in Central Italy. In 1363 the Black Death struck central Italy for the second time, causing a detectable shift in notions of the afterlife and patterns of charitable giving. By Samuel K. Cohn, Jr. Johns Hopkins University Press. Throughout Tuscany and Umbria, patricians and peasants alike abandoned their previous practice of dividing bequests into small sums, combining them instead into last gifts to enhance their "fame and glory" and that of their lineages

The Black Death Transformed: Disease and Culture in Early Renaissance EuropeSamuel K. Cities, City-States, and Regional States in North-Central Italy. Giorgio Chittolini - 1989 - Theory and Society 18 (5):689-706. A Hat, a Forbidden Zone, a Question.

The Black Death Transformed: Disease and Culture in Early Renaissance EuropeSamuel K. Jon Arrizabalaga - 2004 - Speculum 79 (4):1053-1055. The Black Death and the Transformation of the West by David Herlihy; Samuel K. Cohn. Alfred Crosby - 1998 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 89:126-126. Jacob Burckhardt as a Theorist of Modernity: Reading the Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy. Roberta Garner - 1990 - Sociological Theory 8 (1):48-57.

Recommend this journal. Renaissance Quarterly.

The Cult of Remembrance and the Black Death: Six Renaissance Cities in Central Italy. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997, p. xiii. Adriano Capelli cites 1749 as the date when the practice changed, but an examination of documents indicates that the change had mostly occurred in 1406, when Florence conquered Pisa. Samuel K. Cohn Jr. Selected by Choice Magazine as an Outstanding Academic Title. Throughout Tuscany and Umbria, patricians and peasants alike abandoned their previous practice of dividing bequests into small sums, combining them instead into last gifts to enhance their "fame and glory" and that of their lineages.

In 1363 the Black Death struck central Italy for the second time, causing a detectable shift in notions of the afterlife and patterns of charitable giving. Throughout Tuscany and Umbria, patricians and peasants alike abandoned their previous practice of dividing bequests into small sums, combining them instead into last gifts to enhance their "fame and glory" and that of their lineages. Illustrative of the new mentality, religious art patronage spread to new social classes, touching even peasants, who sought to be represented "in their very likeness" at the feet of their patron saints. From the supposed center of Renaissance culture―Florence―to the citadel of Franciscan devotion―Assisi―this change in sentiment spurred new levels of demand for monumental burials, testamentary commissions for art, and other efforts to exert control over the living from the grave.

In his award-winning study, Death and Property in Siena, historian Samuel K. Cohn, Jr., used close analysis of last wills to chart transformations in mentalities over a six-hundred-year history. In The Cult of Remembrance and the Black Death, he applies the same methods to compare six Italian city-states―Arezzo, Florence, Perugia, Assisi, Pisa, and Siena―showing the rise of a new Renaissance cult of remembrance. But this new cult was not Burckhardt's Renaissance "individualism" tout court. Instead, the new piety grew in tandem with reverence for the ancestors and a strong sense of family identity that flowed down male blood lines.