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ePub Van Gogh in Auvers: His Last Days download

by Axel Ruger,Wouter van der Veen

ePub Van Gogh in Auvers: His Last Days download
Author:
Axel Ruger,Wouter van der Veen
ISBN13:
978-1580933018
ISBN:
1580933017
Language:
Publisher:
The Monacelli Press (October 26, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1930 kb
Fb2 file:
1703 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt lit mbr
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
120

Wouter van der Veen, scientific advisor at the Van Gogh Institute in Auvers-sur-Oise, devoted a decade to studying van Gogh’s correspondence and assisted in the production of the first complete catalog of his letters. He teaches at the University of Strasbourg.

Wouter van der Veen, scientific advisor at the Van Gogh Institute in Auvers-sur-Oise, devoted a decade to studying van Gogh’s correspondence and assisted in the production of the first complete catalog of his letters.

Van Gogh in Auvers book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Van Gogh in Auvers: His Last Days as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Wouter Van der Veen.

In the last seventy days of his life, Vincent van Gogh experienced an unprecedented burst of creativity. He painted at least one canvas per day, often more, and wrote dozens of eloquent, personal letters to family, fellow artists, and friends. For the first time, this volume gathers all that he produced during these last few months and presents it in a day-by-day chronology that reveals his intense focus on the continuing development of his signature artistic method as well as his innermost thoughts and concerns.

Back to Our Shelves . Van Gogh in Auvers: His Last Days. by Wouter Van der Veen. A ?nal chapter fully explores the often overlooked role played by his sister-in-law, Johanna Bonger, in cultivating and establishing his posthumous legacy.

Vincent van Gogh’s Stay in Auvers-sur-Oise 1.

Vincent van Gogh’s Stay in Auvers-sur-Oise 17. May 20–July 29, 1890. Paintings and Studies by Vincent van Gogh in Auvers-sur-Oise 69. 70 71 On May 20, 1890, Vincent van Gogh left Paris, where he had Seurat’s pointillism, for example, that Vincent had just spent three days with his brother Theo, his sister-in-law familiarized himself with in 1887, consists of the juxtapo- Johanna, and little Vincent, his four-month-old godson. He sition of points of color whose relations and proportions was thirty-seven years old.

Farms near Auvers or Thatched Cottages by a Hill is an oil painting by Vincent van Gogh that he painted in July 1890 when he lived in Auvers-sur-Oise, France. The painting is an example of the double-square canvases that he employed in his last landscapes. Van Gogh spent the last few months of his life in Auvers-sur-Oise, a small town just north of Paris, after he left an asylum at Saint-Rémy in May 1890.

1st American ed. by Wouter van der Veen

1st American ed. Published 2010 by Monacelli Press in New York. Last years, Painters, Correspondance, Biography. Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890). Vincent van Gogh's stay in Auvers-sur-Oise, May 20-July 29, 1890. Paintings and studies created by Vincent van Gogh in Auvers-sur-Oise, May 20-July 29, 1890. Johanna Bonger's legacy, October 4, 1862-September 2, 1925.

Wouter van der Veen Van Gogh in Auvers: his last days New York, 2010.

In the last seventy days of his life, Vincent van Gogh experienced an. .Van Gogh would spend seventy days in Auvers-sur-Oise. Perhaps van Gogh wanted to use it because he judged that it was the most appropriate or this composition. Auvers-sur-Oi se. He would paint almost eighty canvases there beore ending his lie. This period is oten described as a tragic one or Vincent. But today, based on a critical reading o his letters, we can rule out any simplistic image o the painter as tormented. In Auvers-sur-Oise, Vincent van Gogh was possessed above all o a urious desire and an absolute need to paint.

In the last seventy days of his life, Vincent van Gogh experienced an unprecedented burst of creativity. He painted at least one canvas per day, often more, and wrote dozens of eloquent, personal letters to family, fellow artists, and friends. For the first time, this volume gathers all that he produced during these last few months and presents it in a day-by-day chronology that reveals his intense focus on the continuing development of his signature artistic method as well as his innermost thoughts and concerns.Persuaded by his doting brother, Theo, to move to the artistic enclave of Auvers-sur-Oise in 1890 for a change of scenery and a chance at a life free from temptation, and with the intent of concentrating solely on painting and restoring his full mental health, van Gogh arrived in May just as the town and its nearby bucolic fields were bursting into full springtime glory, providing him ample material for inspiration. Stunning reproductions of his last paintings display his daily explorations of this charming hamlet’s streets and buildings, including its now-iconic church and thatched cottages, its inhabitants—including his friend and mentor Doctor Gachet, immortalized on canvas—and the wide, open fields that roused him to paint masterpieces such as Wheat Field with Crows and Landscape with a Carriage and a Train. Despite these idyllic surroundings, his encouraging pace of production, and mounting critical recognition, van Gogh chose to end his own life a mere two and a half months later, leaving the letters and paintings duplicated here as the only clues to the internal anguish that led him to an act of such desperation.The full complexity of van Gogh’s personality, emotions, and relationships is presented here through reproductions of historical documents, letters, and glorious full-color plates of over seventy paintings, each of which is also accompanied by incisive commentary from author Wouter van der Veen, a renowned van Gogh scholar. A final chapter fully explores the often overlooked role played by his sister-in-law, Johanna Bonger, in cultivating and establishing his posthumous legacy.
  • Surely the first requisite of any new large expensive book about an artist as familiar as Van Gogh is to ensure his paintings are reproduced better than ever before?

    The major flaw in this impressively researched book is the poor quality of the reproductions. Someone seems to have decided to downplay his impasto brushwork and opt instead for an almost lithographic printing process on matt paper. Meaning no pop-off-the-page stimulation as one flicks through these 300 pages. Suspicions soon begin to form that recording every detail of his last 69 days is a pretext for yet another long scholarly treatise rather than being an ideal opportunity to concentrate on what really counts - presenting the 70 canvases from his final Auvers period in the best possible light.

    Suspicions easily confirmed by checking certain paintings against 6 other Van Gogh books - in particular Hadje Cantz's "Van Gogh: Fields". Which shows if enough care is taken printers can give the correct value to every subtle green, yellow and blue tone in his double-square field compositions - and include almost every brush stroke too.

    Next one finds weak reds can ruin major portraits. Like the one of Marguerite Gaschet at the Piano where her long pink/white dress becomes flat white and her skin looks like putty. Or the audacious all-blue portrait of Adeline Ravoux where the focal point of the entire picture - her red lips and cheeks - are virtually non-existent. And so on.

    Rather than go into a long discourse about Vincent being treated so badly (once again) I prefer to upload some photos so direct comparisons can be made. As one can't cheat with this process Amazon readers can decide if issues such as taking the trouble to be scrupulously accurate about paying dutiful tribute to a genius still matter in the 21st century.

    And perhaps reflect on one inescapable irony. By failing to ensure his output was reproduced exactly as Van Gogh intended it to be seen these 2 writers join a long line of art scholars in detached ivory towers whose egos prevent them from getting to the heart of the matter. Which is it's all about the paintings. Not what they think about them.

    Nevertheless "Van Gogh in Auvers" is an essential purchase for every died-in-the-wool Van Gogh enthusiast!

  • I have read more than 20 books on Van Gogh and I found this book to be full of detailed information of his last days which I had never seen before. It also was fascinating and heartbreaking to read so much research related to Theo's last 6 months. I would highly recommend this book to any lover of Vincent's art.

  • Another excellent book chronicling the life of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh and the last seventy days of
    the troubled life of a great artistic genius.

  • Is a very interesting concept to focus on the last 90 days and the frantic volume of painting executed by Van Gogh during that period.

    The text is illuminating and the illustrations reproduced excellently.

    The format is mid size so the book does not overwhelm the paintings and I recommend this for all Van Gogh enthusiasts.

  • The views and writings are awfully biased. While the authors try hard to build their own case about Vincent, which is entirely different from those by other scholars and art historians of van gogh, their very 'unique' interpretation of "facts" is just laughable and equally without evidence. One of their brilliant discoveries is that Vincent didn't just sell one painting in his life, but he sold ALL his paintings to Theo, because Theo supported him and he said the paintings belong toTheo. I've never heard such bullshit in my life. Theo is family, he supported the brother he loved. Although he's an art dealer himself, there's no evident whatsoever that Vincent ever SOLD any of his works to Theo in the trading sense - you name a price and the buyer buy the work. This is just one example of how preposterous the authors' theories are. And their tone of writing and choice of words are simply impertinent, as if they're the only intelligent people who can tell simple facts from the false myths that the other experts or scholars spinned around Vincent. I've never ever read such an awful art book before on such an important artist in history. Besides, the design of the book is also poor, many tiny pictures without any captions are featured next to the text, you have to check each one of them for information at the back on the listing. And they freely crop Vincent's paintings without any information about the painting on the related page. While some of the "myths" about van Gogh might be false or arguable, the theories of the authors are equally, if not more, absurd and unprovable, eg. only one painting was allegedly sold because it's the only one being recorded, therefore van Gogh might have sold more than one in his life time, which also contradict their own saying about Vincent selling ALL his works to Theo (They kept emphasising this brilliant idea tediously in different articles). All in all, the authors kept repeating their poor theories again and again without much evidence, and raised pointless questions to trash other established theories, while they cannot even provide answers themselves. I am shocked and disgusted that such a book filled with contradictory views and poor arguments was even published. While the idea of tracing Vincent's works in Auvers before his tragic death is valuable (btw the authors said it's not so tragic after all coz many other artists in history also took their lives, so it's not so significant that Vincent took his), the text written by the authors (one of them is considered a scholar indeed!) are arrogant and offensive in general. In the eyes of the authors, Vincent was healthy as a bull in general, reasonably well off (could afford to live in hotels and ate his meals outside with money coming from the well paid Theo ), totally NOT insane (They acknowledged he has been ill but there's no way to tell what his illness was exactly), worked like a horse all his life (therefore the amount of work that he produced in his last 70 days on earth is also not very significant). In Note to the reader, it says "The intention of this book is to present factual materials available today, without speculation, without polemics, and devoid of improbable theories..." I found it the contrary in every sense possible.