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ePub Compass in Hand: Selections From The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection download

by Connie Butler,Gary Garrels,Christian Rattemeyer,Harvey Shipley Miller

ePub Compass in Hand: Selections From The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection download
Author:
Connie Butler,Gary Garrels,Christian Rattemeyer,Harvey Shipley Miller
ISBN13:
978-0870707452
ISBN:
0870707450
Language:
Publisher:
The Museum of Modern Art, New York (May 1, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1834 kb
Fb2 file:
1397 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
491

Formed by Harvey S. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection was conceived to be the widest possible cross-section.

Formed by Harvey S. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection was conceived to be the widest possible cross-section of contemporary drawing made primarily within the past 20 years.

Organized by Christian Rattemeyer, The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator of Drawings, with Cornelia H. Butler, The Robert Lehman . Interview with Harvey S. Shipley Miller by Gary Garrels, 2009 Hardcover, 320 pages. Press release 5 pages. Butler, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings. Download digital wallpaper of Kelley Walker’s nine disasters (Florida City; Maui; Moran; San Fernando Valley; Anchorage; Kobe; Elba; Los Angeles; TWA Flight 800). Compass in Hand: Selections from The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection. Hear artists speak about their work. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith . Christian Rattemeyer, Cornelia H. Butler, Gary Garrels. Judith Rothschild Foundation, Harvey S. Shipley Miller. Издание: иллюстрированное. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection was conceived to be the widest possible cross-section of contemporary drawing made primarily within the past 20 years, surveying gestural and geometric abstraction, representation and figuration, systems-based and Conceptual work, as well as appropriation and collage.

Rather, it is a vast trove of twenty-five hundred drawings amassed posthumously by Harvey S. Shipley Miller, a trustee of the Rothschild Foundation, with the aid of two advisors: André Schlechtriem and Gary Garrels. Nothing diminishes the fact that the Rothschild Collection is the largest gift of drawings ever made to MoMA; Compass in Hand is the largest drawing exhibition ever mounted in its galleries. For all the self-congratulatory, back slapping heroics discussed in the catalogue, the idea that this collection is about a brief moment in time is questionable: for example, Miller and Garrels also purchased several drawings from the 1960s and 70s. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The . Gary Garrels, Christian Rattemeyer. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection was conceived to be the widest possible cross-section of contemporary drawing made primarily. Christian Rattemeyer. Compass in Hand brings together approximately 250 work. т 3010. What Is Art?: Conversations With Joseph Beuys. Book Description"I know that from hi. т 3408. 2005 Christian Pocket Planner.

And so, given the museum’s hand in assembling the gift (Gary Garrells, then chief curator of drawings, worked closely with the foundation’s Harvey S. Shipley Miller), this exhibition can justifiably be interpreted as the Modern’s definitive statement on the discipline of drawing as it lives i. . Shipley Miller), this exhibition can justifiably be interpreted as the Modern’s definitive statement on the discipline of drawing as it lives in the memory and practice of the post-baby boom generations. The show opens with a bang. As you escape MoMA’s corporate atrium through the glass doors of the contemporary galleries, you are greeted by André Thomkins’ large red, white, and blue abstraction from 1965

Scott Gerson, Connie Butler, MR Gary Garrels.

Scott Gerson, Connie Butler, MR Gary Garrels. Formed by Harvey S.

Compass in Hand: Selections From the Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection conveys this ambivalence in all its amazing messiness. The show might almost be parenthetically titled museum on a couch, so clearly does the Modern seem to flop down, stare at the ceiling and mull things over, in a ess mode. This exhibition is the first attempt to make sense of the largest gift of drawings the Modern has ever received: a collection of 2,500 drawings by 650 artists given to the museum in a single lump in May of 2005.

Formed by Harvey S. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection was conceived to be the widest possible cross-section of contemporary drawing made primarily within the past 20 years, surveying gestural and geometric abstraction, representation and figuration, systems-based and Conceptual work, as well as appropriation and collage. While the collection primarily focuses on the work of artists living and working in what are widely regarded as five major centers of visual art today--New York, Los Angeles, London/Glasgow, Berlin and Cologne/Düsseldorf--it also includes artists from 30 countries throughout Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa. Established artists such as Jasper Johns are represented through examples of recent work, while others, such as Joseph Beuys and Philip Guston, are highlighted through core historic groupings, and still others are shown in a comprehensive overview of their careers, including Alighiero e Boetti, Lee Bontecou, Ray Johnson, Anish Kapoor, Franz West, Bruce Conner and Hannah Wilke. Minimal and Conceptual drawings from the 1960s and 1970s acquired by the foundation from New York-based collectors Eileen and Michael Cohen are juxtaposed with major works by self-taught artists including James Castle, Henry Darger, Ele D'Artagnan and Pearl Blauvelt, representing a diverse anthology of works on paper. Additional highlights, both contemporary and historic, include works by Tomma Abts, Kai Althoff, Robert Crumb, Tacita Dean, Peter Doig, Angus Fairhurst, Mark Grotjahn, Richard Hamilton, Eva Hesse, Charline von Heyl, Christian Holstad, Roni Horn, Ellsworth Kelly, Martin Kippenberger, Roy Lichtenstein, Sherrie Levine, Lee Lozano, Agnes Martin, Cady Noland, Jennifer Pastor, Elizabeth Peyton, Adrian Piper, Paul Thek, Richard Wright and Andrea Zittel. Reminiscent of the classic 2002 MoMA catalogue Drawing Now and published to accompany a major 2009 exhibition at The Museum, this volume brings together approximately 250 representative works.
  • Saw the show at MoMa and enjoyed it. The book has great reproductions to consider at my leisure, some of which I didn't remember seeing. Also a great resource for my high school art classes. Not the traditional idea of drawing - if that's what you're after.

  • This is not a good reference book. I thought it was so boring, I returned it. I thought the paintings were simply awful except for the cover.