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ePub To Paint Her Life: Charlotte Salomon in the Nazi Era download

by Mary Lowenthal Felstiner

ePub To Paint Her Life: Charlotte Salomon in the Nazi Era download
Author:
Mary Lowenthal Felstiner
ISBN13:
978-0060171056
ISBN:
0060171057
Language:
Publisher:
Harpercollins; 1st edition (July 1, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1211 kb
Fb2 file:
1178 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
828

To Paint Her Life book. Charlotte Salomon was a German-Jewish artist who created a stunning visual diary of her life as a young artist in Nazi Berlin and as a refugee in France; she died in Auschwitz at age twenty-six.

To Paint Her Life book. To Paint Her Life tells the story of Salomon's extraordinary life and death.

Mary Lowenthal Felstiner. The book is a powerful and evocative exploration of a life so damaged by people near and far from Charlotte that her only recourse was to the truth which she found in the act of painting

Mary Lowenthal Felstiner. To Paint Her Life: Charlotte Salomon in the Nazi Era. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997. The book is a powerful and evocative exploration of a life so damaged by people near and far from Charlotte that her only recourse was to the truth which she found in the act of painting. Felstiner has ably given life, freedom, and credibility to Charlotte's gesture of recreating herself and immortalising her story through her legacy of paintings.

Who was Charlotte Salomon, and why has historian Felstiner devoted 10 years of her life to reconstructing Charlotte's? Lotte Salomon was a German Jew who died in the Holocaust but left behind an incomparable and profoundly moving work of art. Life? or Theater? An Operetta consists o. . Life? or Theater? An Operetta consists of more than 700 paintings accompanied by a running narrative and an assortment of lyrics.

Neither the young Charlotte nor her origins were promising: Her mother, her aunt, and other family members committed suicide. Though from a well-to-do Berlin Jewish family, the young art student was described by a contemporary as ""withdrawn, serious, pale, tall and nondescript. Felstiner terms it Salomon's attempt to create a lasting self in a family where self-obliteration was the rule and at a time when the obliteration of her people was being effected.

She painted her life story during the Nazi years in the form of an operetta

She painted her life story during the Nazi years in the form of an operetta. Her paintings recently on display in the US tell a painful, vivid story of her, her parents, and her lover. This book is about what happened to Charlotte Salomon and her family during the Nazi years, but will also be of great interest to people interested in art, and in the human condition. I cannot recommend it highly enough.

To Paint Her Life: Charlotte Salomon in the Nazi Era Format: Hardcover Authors: Mary Lowenthal Felstiner ISBN10: 0060171057 Published: 1994-07-01 A biography of Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon, who was born in Germany in 1917, and exiled to France in 1939 where she spent th.

To Paint Her Life: Charlotte Salomon in the Nazi Era Format: Hardcover Authors: Mary Lowenthal Felstiner ISBN10: 0060171057 Published: 1994-07-01 A biography of Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon, who was born in Germany in 1917, and exiled to France in 1939 where she spent the next two years creating a lifetime's work-765 watercolors overlaid by written texts. and tunes that captured the dramatic events of her life-finally to be transported to Auschwitz where she was a victim of the genocide in 1943. Includes 64 bandw photographs throughout and an 8-page color insert.

Charlotte Salomon was a German-Jewish artist who created a stunning visual diary of her life as a young artist in Nazi Berlin and as a refugee in France; she died in Auschwitz at age twenty-six. To Paint Her Life" tells the story of Salomon's extraordinary life and death. University of California Press.

In her biography of the painter Charlotte Salomon, who was transported from Drancy to Auschwitz in September 1943, Mary Felstiner quotes from the testimony of. HarperCollins.

In her biography of the painter Charlotte Salomon, who was transported from Drancy to Auschwitz in September 1943, Mary Felstiner quotes from the testimony of Holocaust survivors the following points: For some, Pitchipoi was the nonsense name of a Polish ghetto, a Yiddish name used by Polish Jews; for some, the word "resonated like an eternal curse"; for others, "Pitchipoi was a place of compulsory forced labor".

A courageous Jewish artist who left behind a monumental archive of paintings comes alive in this extraordinary biography. Charlotte Salomon, born in Germany in 1917, exiled to France in 1939, spent the next 2 intense, suspenseful years creating a lifetime's work--more than 700 watercolors overlaid by written texts and tunes that captured the dramatic events of her own life. This luminous work stands alone in the history of art and of autobiography. It is the most innovative record we have from the midst of the Holocaust, a visual path through those dark times. Salomon's work survives intact in Amsterdam, but until now no one has unfolded the real life behind the painted one. Mary Felstiner spent 10 years of searching for & interviewing Salomon's relatives & classmates, her mentor's students, her acquaintances in exile, & survivors of the concentration camps. Felstiner shapes an immensely moving account of a woman haunted by personal trauma & trapped in grim historical conditions. TO PAINT HER LIFE resounds with the artist's own words & images. We see her losing her mother to suicide. Being admitted to the prestigious Berlin Art Academy and then expelled. Witnessing the rising tide of Nazism. Falling in love & suffering loss. Leaving her home for exile on the Riviera. Choosing whether to take her own life--or to put it into art. Painting secrets her family kept from her & secrets she kept from them. Making choices that speak to us all--to love someone, to leave a home, to face memories, to recount it all. TO PAINT HER LIFE also traces a shadow story behind Charlotte Salomon's--that of Alois Brunner, Eichmann's right-hand man, the notorious SS officer responsible for deporting to death camps more than 100,000 Jews. With Salomon & Brunner representing creation and destruction in sharp contrast, Felstiner brings together previously unknown facts of their 2 lives & opens provocative ne perspectives on gender and genocide.
  • This book is fascinating. It was thoroughly researched, and gives a compelling account of the effects of the rise of the Nazi movement and the slow and excruciating restrictions on the Jews living in Berlin, particularly this one family of the Salomons. Although I studied art history, I had never heard of Charlotte Salomon until a friend told me of an exhibit she'd seen of her work in San Francisco. After learning about her and looking at her very personal paintings, I felt as if I'd discovered the Jewish Frida Kahlo. Like Kahlo, Salomon's work is biographical and very, very personal. Obviously it is not surreal like Kahlos, but still I felt this artist was driven "to paint her life" and left us with a wonderful gift of her work.

  • I have the big full size version which I consider a very great book. A truly inspiring experience to read and meditate on.
    Many awakening experiences reached through this book.

  • I found a copy of To Paint Her Life quite by chance at Shakespeare and Co. in Paris. I had no previous knowledge of the author or the subject of the book, and I wasn't sure why I was drawn to it. It was the only book I purchased there. I adored it. It is a rich description of Charlotte Salomon's life -- including but not limited to her life as an artist -- under the Nazis, about her remarkable art itself, and about, well, life itself. I relished everything about this book and hated to finish it. I cannot recommend it highly enough. It enriched my life, and it stays with me years later.

  • In the early 1980's, while browsing the discount table at my favorite bookstore of the time (Orr Books in Uptown Minneapolis, RIP), I stumbled on this huge art book from Viking Press simply titled Charlotte, which featured the entirety of German Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon's magnum opus, Life? Or Theater? This autobiographical work consists of 769 unforgettably expressive and powerful gouache paintings with accompanying text, covering in rich detail her childhood in Berlin, dark family secrets of multiple suicides, her education in art school, and her obsessive love affair with her stepmother's brilliant but eccentric voice teacher, all against the backdrop of the growing menace of the Nazi regime. Salomon, desperate to create meaning out of the chaos and despair of her life and times, worked obsessively from 1941-1943 to complete her story while living in exile in France. Some months after completing the work she was ultimately captured and killed by the Nazis in late 1943. Thankfully, her work was saved. Charlotte and Life Or Theater made a huge impact on me and I've kept them close to my heart ever since. Charlotte is still not as well known as she should be, though over the years there have been more and more exhibitions of Life or Theater internationally and even a non-fiction film or two covering her life and work. I tell people about her all the time, but the book, being the doorstop that it is, is not an easy lender.

    Then, in late 1998, while visiting London, I chanced upon a poster in the Tube station advertising an exhibit of Life? Or Theater? at the Royal Academy, going on right then, that very month! I dragged my boyfriend of the time there, posthaste. The power of seeing Charlotte's paintings in front of me - something I hadn't ever thought would happen - was indescribable. I left the gallery overcome with emotion, barely able to speak for a time (the BF was very understanding). To this day it's the shining moment of all my years of museum and gallery hopping - the closest I've ever had to experiencing the Stendhal Syndrome. I since have really come to see Life or Theater as an early graphic novel; perhaps that is why its inspiration has been so powerful to me. The blending of words and pictures to tell a story, there's nothing else like it.

    Anyway, this book by Mary Lowenthal Felstiner - the one I'm supposed to be commenting upon here - is a valuable companion to the art book discussed above, filling in many of the biographical blanks that Charlotte's mix of fiction and fact work couldn't possibly have offered, and providing a more detailed portrait of the times in which she lived, worked, and died. Reading about the atrocities of the Nazi regime is always extremely painful and infuriating, but Ms. Felstiner interweaves all this history, biography, and analysis quite artfully, reminding us in the end that Charlotte's art has lived on, triumphantly (Never Forget, as we are always reminded). Anyone who has appreciated Salomon's work will undoubtedly find this a necessary read. Five stars.