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ePub Paris 1900: The 'American School' at the Universal Exposition download

by Diane P. Fischer

ePub Paris 1900: The 'American School' at the Universal Exposition download
Author:
Diane P. Fischer
ISBN13:
978-0813526409
ISBN:
081352640X
Language:
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press (September 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1148 kb
Fb2 file:
1115 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit mbr mobi
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
889

Well written meaningful expositions on the centenary anniversary art show of the 1900 'World's Fair' in Paris. Held at the Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, New Jersey beginning in the fall of 1999 through January 2000, then traveling and eventually winding up its run in Paris mid-May 2001, this exhibit revisits the formative moment in the birth of an "American School of Art". History meets art meets business meets politics circa 1900 and brought b A rare gem in the annals of art exhibit catalogs.

The Exposition Universelle of 1900, better known in English as the 1900 Paris Exposition, was a world's fair held in Paris, France, from 14 April to 12 November 1900, to celebrate the achievements of the past century and to accelerate developmen.

The Exposition Universelle of 1900, better known in English as the 1900 Paris Exposition, was a world's fair held in Paris, France, from 14 April to 12 November 1900, to celebrate the achievements of the past century and to accelerate development into the next.

Exposition universelle (1900 : Paris, France), Art, American - 19th century - Exhibitions. Rutgers University Press ; Montclair, . Montclair Art Museum. Fischer, Diane Pietrucha; Docherty, Linda Jones; Montclair Art Museum.

Fischer, Diane P. (1999). Paris 1900: The "American School" at the Universal Exposition. Thunder at the Gates: The Black Civil War Regiments That Redeemed America. Rutgers University Press. p. 14. ISBN 0-8135-2640-X. ISBN 978-0-465096640. Shaw, Robert Gould (1999).

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Paris 1900: 'The American School' at the Universal Exposition, Montclair Art Mu. Mus. of A. Bruson, Jean-Marie, and Fischer, Diane . eds. Paris 1900: Les Artistes Américains à l'Exposition Universelle. of Am. Art of the Penn. Exh. cat. Musée Carnavalet, Paris, 2001: 43, 48 fig. 42, 49 (not in the exhibition).

Diane P. Fischer opens the principal essay of the Paris 1900 catalogue with a reference to the self-conscious declaration of the American Department of Fine Arts at the Paris Exposition of 1900 to present the United States as a nation free of foreign trammels. The examination of this desire to assert a unique American identity, both political and artistic, binds Fischer’s text with the other.

In Paris 1900: The American School at the Universal Exposition, a show evoking the Exposition that Diane P. Fischer has organized for the Montclair Art Museum, almost every painting is presented as an illustration of some admired social value in the America of 1900. The establishment of the Whitney Museum of American Art 30 years later continued what the Exposition began. The United States was a great nation; ergo, it had to support, advance, and nurture the creation of great indigenous art. After World War II, with most of the world prostrate, American art finally did assume center stage

Following these itineraries overseas and back, Uslenghi illuminates the contested, political, and transformative relations that emerged as images and material culture travelled.

In essays by Diane P. Fischer, Linda J. Docherty, Robert W. Rydell, Gabriel P. Weisberg, and Gail Stavitsky, Paris 1900 examines the campaign . Weisberg, and Gail Stavitsky, Paris 1900 examines the campaign sponsored by the .

By the turn of the century, Americans believed that they deserved their own “school” of art—not simply because they produced quality work, but also because they assumed they were predestined to inherit the mantle of western civilization. In the wake of the Spanish-American War, the U.S. had emerged as a genuine political superpower. The Exposition universelle et international de Paris of 1900—the largest international cultural event in terms of attendance until the New York World’s Fair of 1964—was the perfect vehicle for Americans to promote all the richness of a vibrant American culture. 

          Paris 1900 examines the campaign orchestrated by the federally-sponsored U.S. Department of Fine Arts to prove the existence of a distinct “American school” of art, responding to earlier  French criticism that American art was primarily a reflection of the French style. At the 1900 Parisian fair, the McKinley administration’s crusade involved installing paintings which exuded “American character,” such as images of virile men, wholesome women, pristine landscapes, and technologically supreme cities. Paintings by still-powerful American expatriates were also included: Exhibiting only native themes would have smacked of a provincialism inconsistent with the administration’s imperialist agenda.

          This campaign was successful; American painters were lavished with medals, and critics enthusiastically sanctioned an “Ecole Américaine,” as it was to be known in the next century. Yet the legacy of this exposition has remained unnoticed—until now. With its lucid articles and beautiful illustrations, this book examines how the 1900 exposition functioned as a bridge to the twentieth century, creating the conditions for the emergence of the American urban realism and modernism, as well as for New York to eventually displace Paris as the center of the art world.

          Featuring over 140 color and black-and-white illustrations, Paris 1900 is a companion volume for a major exhibition of over 80 paintings, sculptures, and decorative art objects to be displayed at the Montclair Art Museum, which opens in September 1999, before traveling to museums in Philadelphia, Columbus, Ohio, and Paris.