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ePub Foundations of Music and Musicianship download

by David A. Damschroder

ePub Foundations of Music and Musicianship download
Author:
David A. Damschroder
ISBN13:
978-0028706610
ISBN:
0028706617
Language:
Publisher:
Schirmer; 1 edition (February 25, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1202 kb
Fb2 file:
1663 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt rtf mobi
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
153

David Damschroder teaches music theory at the University of Minnesota. Damschroder's emphasis on learning through doing. Students will sing, clap, and play their way to understanding the basic grammar of music

David Damschroder teaches music theory at the University of Minnesota. He is author of LISTEN AND SING (Schirmer) and the forthcoming AN ESSAY ON HARMONIC ANALYSIS. Students will sing, clap, and play their way to understanding the basic grammar of music. The text starts at the very beginning of musical notation and works its way through rhythm, meter, scales, accidentals, chords, and some chromaticiscm.

Start by marking Foundations of Music and Musicianship (with .

Start by marking Foundations of Music and Musicianship (with CD-ROM) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. Be an active participant in the learning process with FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC AND MUSICIANSHIP with accompanying CD-ROM! The many activities in this book, along with the accompanying CD-ROM, will help you learn the fundamental concepts of music theory so that you can read and make music from written notation. Interactive computer-based exercises to complement each chapter, sp Be an active participant in the learning process with FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC AND MUSICIANSHIP with accompanying CD-ROM!

Foundations of Music & Musicianship book.

Foundations of Music & Musicianship book.

If your students have never played a musical instrument. if musical terms such as pitch and chord are unfamiliar to them. or if they simply need a refresher on the fundamentals of music. this book will help students. this book will help students unleash their musical talent. With David Damschroder's expert guidance, they'll learn the fundamental concepts of music theory not as a spectator, but as an active participant

For the beginning student with little background in music, this text presents a challenging program for mastering fundamental concepts of music theory.

For the beginning student with little background in music, this text presents a challenging program for mastering fundamental concepts of music theory. Richly illustrated with music examples, it systematically teaches the essential elements of music from basic notation and interval recognition to chord identification and melody harmonization. A fine text to begin learning the grammar of music. com User, May 18, 2004.

With David Damschroder's expert guidance, they'll learn the fundamental concepts of music theory not as a spectator, but as an active participant. David Damschroder teaches music theory at the University of Minnesota

With David Damschroder's expert guidance, they'll learn the fundamental concepts of music theory not as a spectator, but as an active participant. Part I: INTERVALS, SCALES, and TRIADS. David Damschroder teaches music theory at the University of Minnesota. the text gets into harmonic analysis very much in line with what most college undergraduate music majors d. With the many activities in this book-and the accompanying CD-ROM enclosed free with every new copy of this text-they'll soon be reading and making music from written notation. In Part One, the author explains intervals, scales, and triads. In Part Two, he expands the discussion to include chords and chord progressions.

With David Damschroder's expert guidance, theyÂ'll learn the fundamental concepts of music theory not as a spectator .

With David Damschroder's expert guidance, theyÂ'll learn the fundamental concepts of music theory not as a spectator, but as an active participant. With the many activities in this book-and the accompanying CD-ROM enclosed free with every new copy of this text-theyÂ'll soon be reading and making music from written notation.

David A. Damschroder. Get started today for free.

For the beginning student with little background in music, this text presents a challenging program for mastering fundamental concepts of music theory. Richly illustrated with music examples, it systematically teaches the essential elements of music from basic notation and interval recognition to chord identification and melody harmonization.
  • Very easy to learn music with this book if you only have a little background knowledge of music. It was for a college course

  • I got this for my basic theory class and it came missing important pages. Don't really know how I'm supposed to pass a class if I don't have the work in my book

  • Great

  • Good

  • What a fabulous resource for an introductory course in music! The book is aimed at liberal arts students who want to take a course in the fundamentals of music, however, I think (way) back to my music theory course in high school and this would have been a terrific text for that kind of course as well.
    Since music making is an activity that involves your mind (and heart), I appreciate Prof. Damschroder's emphasis on learning through doing. Students will sing, clap, and play their way to understanding the basic grammar of music. The text starts at the very beginning of musical notation and works its way through rhythm, meter, scales, accidentals, chords, and some chromaticiscm. By the end of this one term course the student understands the basics of harmonizing simple melodies and can detect errors in notation and matching what they hear with what is written down. There is a good basic glossary and an appendix with additional musical notation helps. An index is also provided.
    Another terrific resource is a CD that contains the musical examples and exercises in the book so the student can work on his or her own and drill themselves a bit and actually work the problems in the book while listening to the exercises through their computer. I like the fact that the student can choose to hear the examples and exercises as a piano, violin, clarinet, oboe, horn, or saxophone if there are pitches. If they are rhythm exercises they can listen to them as a piano, harp, clarinet, vibraphone, drum, or woodblock. It may seem a little thing, but having taught ear training, it does help students to hear examples in the sound they are more familiar in hearing. String players hear strings more easily, woodwind players like to hear woodwinds, and so forth.
    The book also comes with a large fold out chart of the keyboard with each key diagrammed to its exact place on the bass or treble clef. This can be of immeasurable help to non-keyboard players trying to get oriented to reading two staves as a single unit and how they map onto those white and black keys.
    This is a real achievement and I hope it gets widely adopted. It certainly can help students in classes, but it is so well done that someone who was interested in learning this material could work through it on their own with the CD. It might help them to have someone they can go to for help now and again, but things are explained quite well in this book.
    Oh, and when you first try to use the CD, make sure you go to the preferences FIRST and select the proper output mode for your computer.

  • Just plain terrible. By trying to dumb-down concepts, the author has succeeded in making ordinarily straightforward ideas incomprehensible. The reviewer who said presentation is non-linear is absolutely correct. How else would you explain not introducing the "system" (treble and bass staff connected) until the 7th chapter of a twelve chapter book???? To me, the book's greatest weakness--and it was a HUGE weakness--was introducing intervals by key. The result is that you teach students that C-E is a third, but when you ask them to name the interval from D-F/F#, they ask, "in what key?" How ludicrous! I DO NOT recommend this book.

  • I definitely do NOT recommend this text. Unnecessarily complex for incredibly easy to understand topics, indirect and non-linear in its explanations, and just plain silly.