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ePub Music in the Horror Film: Listening to Fear (Routledge Music and Screen Media) download

by Neil Lerner

ePub Music in the Horror Film: Listening to Fear (Routledge Music and Screen Media) download
Author:
Neil Lerner
ISBN13:
978-0415992022
ISBN:
0415992028
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (December 16, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1101 kb
Fb2 file:
1680 kb
Other formats:
docx lit mbr txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
524

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Music in Horror Film is a collection of essays that examine the effects of music and its ability to provoke or. .Neil Lerner is Associate Professor of Music at Davidson College, with his P. in Musicology from Duke University.

Music in Horror Film is a collection of essays that examine the effects of music and its ability to provoke or intensify fear in this particular genre of film. Frightening images and ideas can be made even more intense when accompanied with frightening musical sounds.

Music in Horror Film is a collection of essays that examine the effects of music and its ability to provoke or intensify fear in this particular genre of. Frightening images and ideas can be made even more intense when accompanied with frightening musical sounds, and music in horror film frequently makes its audience feel threatened and uncomfortable through its sudden stinger chords and other shock effects. The essays in this collection address the presence of music in horror films and their potency within them.For Instructors Request Inspection Copy.

Music in Horror Film is a collection of essays that examine the effects of music and its ability to provoke or intensify fear in this particular genre of film

Music in Horror Film is a collection of essays that examine the effects of music and its ability to provoke or intensify fear in this particular genre of film. The essays in this collection address the presence of music in horror films and their potency within them

by Neil Lerner First published December 1st 2009. Published December 16th 2009 by Routledge. Paperback, 240 pages.

by Neil Lerner First published December 1st 2009. Showing 1-8 of 8. Music in the Horror Film: Listening to Fear (Paperback). ISBN: 0415992036 (ISBN13: 9780415992039).

Horror film buff and music department chair Neil Lerner takes viewers on.

Horror film buff and music department chair Neil Lerner takes viewers on a tour of the sounds that signal suspense and startle us into dropping our popcorn. There, a clutch of senior music and film & media studies majors frequently gather to watch horror films-and call it homework. The seminar springs from the mind of Neil Lerner, professor and chair of music, and horror-film buff.

Article excerpt The frequency with which books on film music are being published has .

Neil Lerner (e. Music in the Horror Film: Listening to Fear New York: Routledge, 2010, 240pp. The frequency with which books on film music are being published has been increasing dramatically in the last decade. Not only do readers have a wide selection of new books from which to choose, but the parameters of this interdisciplinary field are gradually becoming more clearly defined. Routledge's new Music and Screen Media Series is original in that each volume of the series is designed as a collection of essays on a particular genre of visual media, including both film and television.

Music in the Horror Film. In: Notes, Vol. 67, No. 3, pp. 533-534.

Music Instruction & Study Books. Routledge Music and Screen Media. Taylor & Francis Ltd (Sales), Routledge. Music in the Horror Film : Listening to Fear. Walmart 9780415992022. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Music in Horror Film is a collection of essays that examine the effects of music and its ability to provoke or intensify fear in this particular genre of film. Frightening images and ideas can be made even more intense when accompanied with frightening musical sounds, and music in horror film frequently makes its audience feel threatened and uncomfortable through its sudden stinger chords and other shock effects. The essays in this collection address the presence of music in horror films and their potency within them. With contributions from scholars across the disciplines of music and film studies, these essays delve into blockbusters like The Exorcist, The Shining, and The Sixth Sense together with lesser known but still important films like Carnival of Souls and The Last House on the Left. By leading us with the ear to hear these films in new ways, these essays allow us to see horror films with fresh eyes.

  • never thought I could enjoy a book on music, but I love horror, so I'd give it a try. turns out it was a pretty good read and taught me something about music in horror cinema. 10/10 would read again

  • Very fun read. Great info for my thesis!

  • I received a free item to review.

    The essays divide roughly between those that describe music in technical terms - including brief, single-staff or short score excerpts - and others which stick strictly to text.

    Julie Brown’s opening essay on the role of the organ and organ music in ‘Carnival of Souls’ is a wonderful opening and ‘table-setter’ for the rest of the collection.

    The pivotal ideas of Brown’s essay is the ambiguity of music that functions on one hand for the benefit of the film audience as part of the film’s ‘geography’, yet at certain pivotal moments, that same music may or may not be heard in real-time by the actors as an integral element of the story. If you know the film it’s a powerful realization. The other fascinating topic is the organ's role in (at least classic era) horror film, both symbolic and musical. We take it for granted as almost a cliche of the past, but the historical associations and ramifications are surprisingly rich.

    The most interesting essay from a musical/analytical perspective is Janet K. Halfyard’s ‘Mischief Afoot’ where she illustrates the use of tritones, chromatic modulations and paradisiac techniques by film composers such as Elfman, Goldstein, etc...

    Halfyard uses one or two system staves to illustrate themes and harmonic passages and the mix of bite-size analysis and thoughtful text is perfect for this context. I was so impressed I picked up a copy of her full-length analysis of Elfman’s Batman score, which I also recommend to musicians in search of film music insight.

    Other essays deal with music as an element of film/cultural criticism which I found equally interesting for various reasons. Many films mentioned are from the 60's-80's - perhaps reflecting the generational bias of the writers – but those also happen to be my own biases so it’s not a problem!

    Rather than a hodgepodge of topics, there appears to be a conscious effort to meld a cohesive set of themes. The editor has wisely cross referenced many essays throughout the book, lending a welcome continuity not always found in such collections.

    I wholeheartedly recommend the book to aspiring film composers looking less for production tips than perhaps for an historical aesthetic along with some vivid and ‘lightly technical’ advice.

    One criticism of the book I have is unfortunately the term ‘atonal’ is bandied-about in a misleading fashion when ‘dissonant’ and ‘excessively chromatic’ would have been more appropriate. ‘Atonal’ opens up a huge can of worms depending on who you’re speaking to but composers and musicians who appreciate the distinction might bristle at the casual usage.
    .