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ePub Camb Companion to the Recorder (Cambridge Companions to Music) download

by John Mansfield Thomson

ePub Camb Companion to the Recorder (Cambridge Companions to Music) download
Author:
John Mansfield Thomson
ISBN13:
978-0521358163
ISBN:
0521358167
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (October 27, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1801 kb
Fb2 file:
1331 kb
Other formats:
lit azw lrf lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
118

This is the only book to cover in detail so many aspects of the voice, ranging from medieval music to Madonna and beyond

Arts & Photography. This is the only book to cover in detail so many aspects of the voice, ranging from medieval music to Madonna and beyond. Almost anything one wants to know about singing practices and singing styles can be found here in chapters that cover world music, rock, rap and jazz; European art song, ensemble singing, the English cathedral tradition and the choral movement in the United States; Renaissance, Baroque and Classical singing treatises, contemporary vocal techniques, children’s choirs and the teaching of singing today.

Each volume provides a carefully structured series of ed essays by leading authorities offering comprehensive coverage and indispensable reference material as well as absorbing reading matter. Critical studies of writings and analyses from Beethoven's day to ours are included, as well as a range of other relevant responses to the work, including compositions, recordings, images and film

Print on demand book Music & Musical Instruments. Art, Architecture & Photography. Thomson & John Mansfield. Print on demand book.

Print on demand book. Music & Musical Instruments. Outdoor Play Equipment. Party & Celebration. Cambridge University Press. Fruugo ID. 30302302-63568372. Delivery Information.

The Cambridge Companions series of Cambridge University Press "are a series of authoritative guides" written by academic scholars on topics and periods related to Literature and Classics, Music, and Philosophy, Religion and Culture

The Cambridge Companions series of Cambridge University Press "are a series of authoritative guides" written by academic scholars on topics and periods related to Literature and Classics, Music, and Philosophy, Religion and Culture. List of Cambridge Companions to Literature and Classics. List of Cambridge Companions to Music. List of Cambridge Companions to Philosophy, Religion and Culture.

This Companion provides a detailed overview of the transformation, encompassing both classical and popular music. This paper demonstrates that the record producer John Culshaw had clear ideas about how recordings might approach the condition of a work of art, rather than being simply the trace of a moment in time.

Cambridge Companions to Music. He ends the book with a selective guide to further reading, organized by topic

Cambridge Companions to Music. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995 He ends the book with a selective guide to further reading, organized by topic.

This is the first book to offer a complete introduction to the recorder. Eight contributors from four different countries write on topics such as the recorder and its music through the centuries, the recorder as orchestral instrument, the professional recorder player through history and today, and the phenomenon of the recorder revival. The Companion also contains basic reference material previously unavailable in one volume. A special feature is the rich collection of illustrations that provide a history of the instrument. The Cambridge Companion to the Recorder will be of interest to performers and students as well as to music enthusiasts.
  • A detailed History Lesson on the Recorder with some "how to" GEMs strewn in along the way...

    For those who are seeking to expand their historical horizon on the development of the recorder and its role in music making through the centuries and broadly, the type and evolution of music written for it. Consists largely of factual texts - but with rather poorly illustrated low-res black and white photos/drawings - covering topics such as:
    - the recorder and its music through the centuries;
    - the use of recorders in an orchestra
    - profressional players and their instruments
    - the revival of the recorder and its role in education (there are some criticisms fr above reviews on the brevity of that topic which was insufficiently dealt with)

    I was, however, not immediately drawn to the book when I first opened it ... but it appears to be an authority on the subject for those seeking it. Personally, for my current purposes, I much prefer Wollitz's Recorder Book which offers practical instruction - but the two books are mutually exclusive, covering totally different aspects of the instrument. To each his own. As a history book - almost first class.

    Wollitz's book "instructs, inspires and aims to facilitate the mastery of recorder playing".
    This book is very much a history lesson about the recorder with some "how tos" gems offered between the paragraphs.

  • Any recorder player will enjoy and learn from this book.
    I have been playing the alto recorder for a year now. This book taught me a great deal about the instrument. What's even better,
    the book carefully introduces the repertory and where to find and read about it.I am delighted to learn that I will never run out of material to play.
    The book is written with care, verve, and love. However, the reader is assumed to have considerable knowledge, to know without explanation, for instance, the implications of wide windways and bores, and narrow windways (p178). The history of the 20th century recorder revival, of great interest to contemporary enthusiasts, is brushed off twice, as "described and discussed in several publications." Fine, then why not this one? This should have been dealt with more carefully. The illustrations are very poorly reproduced. I am still suffering from eyestrain from trying to find the recorder in Plate 27.
    Overall, though, this is a book any recorder player will want.

  • An interesting collection of interesting arguments about the recorder.

    F.U.

  • This is a nice book for the history of the recorder, especially from the points of view of Howard Mayer Brown (Chapter 1) and David Lasocki (Chapters 7&10), but besides these chapters, i feel there are too many shortcomings to this book.
    1. It is almost provincial in that that all the contributors are English. Yes, this is the Cambridge Companion, but they certainly could open it to contributors from the main scene, that is, especially from France, Germany, Holland, Italy and Switzerland. After all, these were and are the main centers of the recorder (and today also China, Japan and Taiwan).
    2. All the contributors are musicologists, and after two or three chapters it becomes quite tiring - and boring. I deeply felt the need to read the point of view of top recorder players - most of them are teachers and some of them are quite a good and intriguing writers.
    3. The chapter about modern music for the recorder is too short and very problematic. The contributor, Eve O'kelly, sounds like those groupies of any avant-garde fart, as horrible as it may be (and as it usually was, Berio's Gesti, for example), and dismiss all those gems of the 20th century repertoire, from Leigh to Genzmer, as "conservative" and nothing more.

    In addition, what's turn many parts of this book to passe are the 20 years from it's publishing.
    First and most is the internet, and second is the deep switch from imperial mind to global mind.

    We have to thank for any contribution to the recorder literature,
    but i'm waiting for an open-minded and really diverse representation of the recorder and it's history and scene.

  • This is the only easily available book about the history of the instrument, with nice chapters dealing with the history of the recorder and coments about the repertoire. so, if you love the recorder, it is a must buy.
    My only complain is that they should include a chapter with systematic and more detailed description and analysis of all Telemann and Hendel sonatas. A non academic chapter about the instruments available in the market, with photos of the various sizes would enlarge the number of readers interested in the book.