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ePub Women of the Underground: Music: Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves download

by Zora von Burden

ePub Women of the Underground: Music: Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves download
Author:
Zora von Burden
ISBN13:
978-1933149196
ISBN:
1933149191
Language:
Publisher:
Manic D Press, Inc. (August 24, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1562 kb
Fb2 file:
1241 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
541

After reading Zora von Burden's newest book, & of the Underground: Music", I was struck by a few unavoidable facts, such as: 1. My music knowledge is not nearly as comprehensive as I had liked to imagine.

After reading Zora von Burden's newest book, & of the Underground: Music", I was struck by a few unavoidable facts, such as: 1. 2. There is a regrettably huge dearth of books focusing on women artists, especially avant-garde and/or groundbreaking women artists. Allow me to elucidate that last point.

Women of the Underground - Zora von Burden. The women included in this book are ts- whose work as incendiary revolutionaries and cultural engineers has influenced subsequent generations. In the underground, these artists are free to roam through sound and body, mind and spirit. The genius and cultural engineering through their various sounds has left an indelible mark on music history, stemming from the counterculture in which they thrive and play.

Women of the Underground book. A frequent contributor to The San Francisco Herald, von Burden also wrote the screenplay for Geoff Cordner’s underground cult classic film, Hotel Hopscotch.

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May be you will be interested in other books by Zora von Burden: Women of the Underground: Music: Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves by Zora von Burden. Author: Zora von Burden. Title: Women of the Underground: Music: Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves. No user reports were added yet. Be the first! Send report: This is a good book.

the Underground - Music : Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves.

Women of the Underground - Music : Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves.

To be truly strong, a performer/artist must enter into extreme vulnerability. If you embrace vulnerability, you emerge fearless from staring your fear in the face. The more open you are in your work as a performer/artist, the more strength you gather. In a series of twenty candid interviews with radical women musicians, author Zora von Burden gives the forerunners of this generation a voice and probes the depths of how and why they broke through society's limitations to create works of outstanding measure. Among the musical genres covered are.

Women of the Underground: Music Interviews by Zora Von Burden In an age where feminism is seen as the filthiest word, any book seeking to celebrate cultural achievements in the context of gender alone is running the gauntlet.

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This ground-breaking anthology will serve as a reference book for art historians as well as an inspiration for young female artists and a general readership interested in alternative culture.

“To be truly strong, a performer/artist must enter into extreme vulnerability. If you embrace vulnerability, you emerge fearless from staring your fear in the face. The more open you are in your work as a performer/artist, the more strength you gather.”—Jarboe (Swans)

In a series of twenty candid interviews with radical women musicians, author Zora von Burden gives the forerunners of this generation a voice and probes the depths of how and why they broke through society’s limitations to create works of outstanding measure. Among the musical genres covered are rock, punk, goth, industrial, electronica, performance art, lounge, and more. An inspiration to young women and fascinating to music fans of all ages and genders, these musical innovators are unconventional, exceptional groundbreakers who have strong followings and have influenced generations for the past fifty years and beyond. An essential reference work for libraries, universities, contemporary art museums, and cultural institutions.

Includes interviews with: Wanda Jackson, Miss Mercy (GTOs), Moe Tucker (Velvet Underground), Nina Hagen, Lydia Lunch, Adele Bertei (The Contortions), Cosey Fanni Tutti (Throbbing Gristle), Jarboe (Swans), Slymenstra (Gwar), Patricia Morrison (Sisters of Mercy, The Damned), Teresa Nervosa (Butthole Surfers), Laurie Anderson, Kembra Pfahler (The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black), Pam Tent (The Cockettes), Pauline Black (The Selecter), and many others.

 

  • What was particularly refreshing about this collection is the span of subjects/interviewees- from Wanda Jackson of the 1950s rockabilly scene to 1990's Kembra Pfahler (I don't know what I'd call her music). Because of the time span, you get to hear from women from overlooked eras/groups that got swept under the rug when Courtney Love was (bogusly) deemed "the first woman rockstar" (as if Janis Joplin, Heart, Joan Jett etc never existed) and forged an outrageous public image. Perhaps it's because of my age, but I've never read any interviews by any of the GTOs or Pam Tent of the Cockettes. By spanning such a lengthy time period and talking with a wide range of artists, aesthetically, you really come to appreciate the paths that were forged by lesser-known (or remembered, or successful) artists, such as Cosi Fanni Tutti.

    Also, the author doesn't just focus on photogenic women who made sexuality a big part of their aesthetic (everybody seems to focus on Debbie Harry these days), but women who were of a more intellectual, less sexual angle- like Laurie Anderson, who is sometimes left out of anthologies I think because she became too famous and too accessible to be considered underground/transgressive/whathaveyou. Also, an interesting pattern that seemed to emerge was the most talented (or perhaps they were just my favorites) and pioneering people tended to be the most humble. Kind of a nice change from the punk/rock bravado of later years. The author also asked very intelligent questions and thus in fairly brief interviews was able to explore deeper issues with most of the subjects in a short time. There are also lots of great gossipy tidbits here and there, as these interviews were very conversational and candid (I assume the interviewer was skilled at making her subjects comfortable and the respect is evident). I did not know that Miss Mercy dated the ultra-crazy genius Arthur Lee and I did not know that Brian Eno liked porn with buxom bald women. Now I do!

    Highly recommended.

  • Cool book, particularly enjoyed the Teresa Taylor (drummer for Butthole Surfers) section. Women in rock should be more recognized, this book spotlights some of the best in the BEST (underground) music.

  • This book delves into insightful dialogue with some of the most fascinating and creative women of our time. I was thrilled to read interviews that span the generations, with singers and musicians like Mo Tucker of the Velvet Underground, Wanda Jackson, Lydia Lunch, and Nina Hagen. A lot of these women have grand stage personas, so I liked being able to see a bit more into their personalities and everyday lives. I really enjoyed reading this one and will definitely get the other book in the series on women in the underground art scene.

  • After reading Zora von Burden's newest book, `Women of the Underground: Music", I was struck by a few unavoidable facts, such as:

    1. My music knowledge is not nearly as comprehensive as I had liked to imagine.
    2. There is a regrettably huge dearth of books focusing on women artists, especially avant-garde and/or groundbreaking women artists.
    3. Ms. Burden had access to some truly legendary artists, not just women artists, but artists in general.

    Allow me to elucidate that last point. This is a rare book without a single wasted page - and not only is no page wasted, but each and every page seems to hold, at the very least, two or three incredibly informative and entertaining gems of conversation. These sometimes take the guise of personal anecdotes (of which there were so many I had never heard before that I'm hard pressed to pick one that I enjoyed the most), or are sometimes expertly pried free and revealed through Ms. Burden's seemingly innate gift of interview. Special mention should be made of the fact that, despite having so many interviews in the book, the author manages to completely avoid the monotonous drudgery and rote questioning so prevalent in much of the journalistic world. Each artist was approached with due respect and sincere interest, with questions thoughtfully tailored to each, which brought forth a candid and personal manner of conversation with each artist. In other words, you can tell that Ms. Burden not only knows the subjects and the world in which she has graciously allowed us to peek into, but that she is extremely intelligent and beguiling as an interlocutor; she manages to keep things fresh and personalized throughout all 20(!) interviews... this is no small feat. I cannot recall a single time that any questions were repeated across any of the interviews... astonishing, really... Bravo, Ms. Burden, bravo indeed. I should also mention that she, amazingly, does all the above without the slightest hint of affectation, without a whiff of ego, she sits back and allows the focus to remain on the artists and their words and stories... she effortlessly glides throughout their conversations like a lithe snake.

    BUT- I digress, back to the subjects and what they had to say:
    The book begins with a fantastic interview with one Wanda Jackson, rather apropos if you ask me, not only because she is, without a doubt, a living legend but that she also represents the first real rebel of the music world; a woman who sang rock and roll. Bless her heart for having the skill and courage to stand up and open the door for every single woman in this book to follow her through. This was definitely the perfect note on which to begin this grand song of a book; Wanda Jackson deserves every bit of success, fame and recognition she has collected in her years as a musician and then some - so by starting this book, which undoubtedly will draw in a much more, diverse, contemporary and avant-garde crowd, Ms. Burden has done a great service to this legendary artist; she has managed to expose the nexus of many of the contemporary artists included in the book, to their generation of fans, who most probably have had no exposure to her otherwise. This is a astute and deliberate move made by someone who expertly understands the historical context of their subjects.

    To move onward to the `contemporary' artists included in this book, let me just gush a bit more and say once more how astounded I am by the unequivocal quality of the artists Ms. Burden very meticulously included in this volume. We have every genre represented here; every major existing genus of avant-garde music is discussed in detail, by the artists who created them in this book. We have the surprisingly grounded and humble Maureen Tucker, member of The Velvet Underground here, discussing the early days of creating a generation-defining musical output. We have the birth of noise (Throbbing Gristle's, Cosey Fanni Tutti), the birth of Glam/Goth (The GTO's, Miss Mercy - The Cockettes', Pam Tent), the birth/deconstruction/re-defining of Punk/Industrial/Theatrical Concept Metal (Patricia Morrison, Jarboe, Teresa Taylor, Lydia Lunch, Nina Hagen, Danielle Stampe) ... I mean, good god, man... the mind boggles at the sheer scale and historical import of the artists represented in this book. I feel as if this book is near impossible to properly "review", it is so well crafted, so pleasurable and so utterly comprehensive that there seem to be no sufficient words to properly convey the scope, scale and brilliance of the overall work. This may sound hyperbolic to some, but I assure you - if you have ever cared for the history of underground art, or the significance and role that women in particular have played in creating it, then this book is without a doubt an essential tome; a bible to ceaselessly reference and learn great things from. It is definitely the best music book I've read in years and I will gladly shout the praises of this book until my voice fails me.

    Buy this book, borrow this book, steal this book... READ THIS BOOK.

    This is the gold standard by which all other books about the cultural milestones that women artists, women musicians and women who have created and defined the underground, avant-garde and independent art world will be judged by. Five out of five stars - without question.

  • Love this amazing collection of interviews. Some women are better known (Laurie Anderson, for example) than others but every single one of them has honest, interesting, unusual things to say about how they started and what their experiences have been like. I appreciated the diversity of styles and eras represented here, beginning with the '50s (rockabilly queen Wanda Jackson). Punk, ska, goth, performance, folk, acid rock, etc. are all represented ... Highly recommended!