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ePub God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War download

by Kathleen E.R. Smith

ePub God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War download
Author:
Kathleen E.R. Smith
ISBN13:
978-0813122564
ISBN:
0813122562
Language:
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky (March 28, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1590 kb
Fb2 file:
1746 kb
Other formats:
mbr docx rtf lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
300

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song―an .

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song―an Over There for World War II. The most popular songs. Complete with a marvelous discography and rare sheet music photographs, God Bless America captures the temperament of a people that faithfully believed Les Brown when he tapped his baton, smiled at the audience, and promised that their dreams were betting better all the time. Smith has written an interesting and useful book, one that raises a number of important issues and illuminates many of them.

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song - an "Over There" for World War I. Smith concludes the government's fears of faltering morale did not materialize.

Smith concludes the government's fears of faltering morale did not materialize. Americans did not need such war songs as "Goodbye, Mama, I'm Off To Yokohama", "There Are No Wings On a Foxhole", or even "The Sun Will Soon Be Setting On The Land Of The Rising Sun" to convince them to support the war.

Smith, Kathleen E. R. (2003). God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War. The University Press of Kentucky. Retrieved 21 April 2017. Anichkin, Alexander (9 May 2012). Comin' in on a Wing and a Prayer (Russian songs of Victory)". Comin' in on a Wing and a Prayer". Retrieved 20 November 2015.

Smith, Kathleen E. Publication, Distribution, et. to outright corn" Tin Pan Alley's music war committee Tin Pan Alley still seeks the "proper" war song Even stale music sells like nylons Jitterbugs and bobby-soxers "Meet Soozie Cue". Lexington, Ky.

Neither group, however, could foresee to what extent the war effort would be defined by advertisers and merchandisers. One advertiser described morale as "a lot of little things," and those little things included beer, chewing gum, tobacco, breakfast cereal - virtually every product on the American market. Selling merchandise was always the first priority of Tin Pan Alley, and the OWI never swayed them from this course. Bu kitaba önizleme yap . Kullanıcılar ne diyor?

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song - an "Over There" for World War I.

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song - an "Over There" for World War II.

Another assemblage, the Tin Pan Alley songsmiths, sat down at pianos and began composing tunes, hoping their .

Another assemblage, the Tin Pan Alley songsmiths, sat down at pianos and began composing tunes, hoping their music would inspire some patriotism during these frightening times.

Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular . In her book, God Bless America: Tin Pan Alley Goes to War, Kathleen .

Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. By the end of the war, no such. song had been produced that could rival hits like "Over There" from World War . .

In: ARSC Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1, pp. 86-87. View it in the Music Periodicals Database. Drag and drop files here.

After Pearl Harbor, Tin Pan Alley songwriters rushed to write the Great American War Song―an "Over There" for World War II. The most popular songs, however, continued to be romantic ballads, escapist tunes, or novelty songs. To remedy the situation, the federal government created the National Wartime Music Committee, an advisory group of the Office of War Information (OWI), which outlined "proper" war songs, along with tips on how and what to write. The music business also formed its own Music War Committee to promote war songs.Neither group succeeded. The OWI hoped that Tin Pan Alley could be converted from manufacturing love songs to manufacturing war songs just as automobile plants had retooled to assemble planes and tanks. But the OWI failed to comprehend the large extent by which the war effort would be defined by advertisers and merchandisers. Selling merchandise was the first priority of Tin Pan Alley, and the OWI never swayed them from this course.Kathleen E.R. Smith concludes the government's fears of faltering morale did not materialize. Americans did not need such war songs as "Goodbye, Mama, I'm Off To Yokohama", "There Are No Wings On a Foxhole", or even "The Sun Will Soon Be Setting On The Land Of The Rising Sun" to convince them to support the war. The crusade for a "proper" war song was misguided from the beginning, and the music business, then and now, continues to make huge profits selling love―not war―songs.
  • One of the best general discussions about popular music during World War II currently available. Her presentation of the tensions between those who wanted a "war song" and those who supported a more evenhanded approach to records and sheet music is thought-provoking and unusual. Highly recommended.

  • Despite the efforts of several government agencies, and the willingness of many topflight songwriters, including Frank Loesser and Irving Berlin, no single song emerged from Tin Pan Alley during World War II that took the war as its subject directly. Berling's own "God Bless America," which became one of the great hits of the wartime era, was actually written at a time slightly preceding the entrance of the US into World War II. Kathleen Smith, the author of this study, whose name oddly enough suggests that of Kate Smith, the moon-faced and wildly popular radio star who made "God Bless America" a monster sensation, suggests that the reason for this is that, enraptured by swing music, the teenagers who controlled the chart did not want to buy martial tunes. They wanted love songs and they wanted music they could dance to. In this way the era seems oddly close to our own. The book's accompanying promotion materials suggest that a similar situation has transpired today, after 9/11 American musicians wanted to create a hit that would show the Al-Qaeda that we were unbowed, but despite the best efforts of everyone from Paul McCartney to Bruce Springsteen and back around again, from all shadings of the right and left, the song that is most mentioned as a result of the terrorist destruction of the World Trade Center was that country number by Toby Keith about the red, white and blue, with the pugnacious lyric, "You'll be sorry that you messed with the U.S. of A./ 'Cause we'll put a boot in your ass/ It's the American way." Some of the WWII would be hit songs expressed similar sentiments against the "Nips" and "Krauts" of Axis fame.

    Smith is an okay writer but her book is somewhat padded, and Kentucky should hire a proofreader, it is trying indeed that Melvyn Douglas and Ralph Bunche both have their names misspelled.