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ePub TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol download

by Jake Austen

ePub TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol download
Author:
Jake Austen
ISBN13:
978-1556525728
ISBN:
1556525729
Language:
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press (July 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1463 kb
Fb2 file:
1298 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
448

TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV f. .has been added to your Cart

TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV f.has been added to your Cart. And now, Austen has penned the definitive tome on all things Rock TV. His prose crackles like a man in awe of his subject, and rightfully so; lucid and engaging, TV-A-Go-Go not only has everything and then some inside, but includes-rather than a mere detailing of who-was-on-what-all manner of interesting, cogent theses on culture woven into the text.

The idiosyncratic history of rock on TV as presented in this book serves two missions.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The idiosyncratic history of rock on TV as presented in this book serves two missions. In the essays contained herein I will offer opinionated histories of under-documented aspects of rock on TV (cartoon rock bands, black-audience music programming, punk on television). For the overdocumented subjects (the Monkees, Dick Clark, 1956 Elvis Presley on TV), I will try to examine why the artifice of rock ‘n’ roll on TV feels so good to me. When I watch rock music on TV I want to be profoundly entertained.

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Long before American Idol captivated audiences, rock music was practically everywhere on TV, starting with Bo Diddley and his sexually encoded lyrics on The Ed Sullivan Show in the mid-1950s and. Стр. x. Титульный лист.

Michael Blodgett, 68; actor went on to write books and screenplays". Retrieved 2008-10-04. Austen, Jake (2005). TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol. p. 44. ISBN 1-55652-572-9. "Lucette Blodgett, Miles Fisher". Retrieved 6 October 2014.

By: Jake Austen These books conform to EPUB3 industry standards.

Print ISBN: 9781556525728, 1556525729. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to TV-a-Go-Go: Rock on TV from American Bandstand to American Idol. eTextbook Return Policy. These books conform to EPUB3 industry standards.

His delightful book, TV a-Go-Go explores the myriad manifestations of this partnership.

According to author Jake Austen, televised rock music is in some ways an impossible combination. and one that he absolutely adores. His delightful book, TV a-Go-Go explores the myriad manifestations of this partnership. Austen, who produces his own children's television dance show called Chic-a-Go-Go, has a feel for what worked and what didn't and his intelligent opines are a delight to read.

I just finished reading TV A-Go-Go and don't recall any "claims of being the definitive book on its subject," as Mr. Rector claims. No one writer could cover everything and nobody would want to read a book that di. Apparently Mr. Rector wanted an encyclopedia of rock on TV, rather than a series of entertaining essays with thought-provoking theses. I'm sorry he didn't get what he wanted, but this was a very worthwhile read

From Elvis and a hound dog wearing matching tuxedos and the comic adventures of artificially produced bands to elaborate music videos and contrived reality-show contests, television—as this critical look brilliantly shows—has done a superb job of presenting the energy of rock in a fabulously entertaining but patently "fake" manner. The dichotomy of "fake" and "real" music as it is portrayed on television is presented in detail through many generations of rock music: the Monkees shared the charts with the Beatles, Tupac and Slayer fans voted for corny American Idols, and shows like Shindig! and Soul Train somehow captured the unhinged energy of rock far more effectively than most long-haired guitar-smashing acts. Also shown is how TV has often delighted in breaking the rules while still mostly playing by them: Bo Diddley defied Ed Sullivan and sang rock and roll after he had been told not to, the Chipmunks' subversive antics prepared kids for punk rock, and things got out of hand when Saturday Night Live invited punk kids to attend a taping of the band Fear. Every aspect of the idiosyncratic history of rock and TV and their peculiar relationship is covered, including cartoon rock, music programming for African American audiences, punk on television, Michael Jackson's life on TV, and the tortured history of MTV and its progeny.
  • I just finished reading TV A-Go-Go and don't recall any "claims of being the definitive book on its subject," as Mr. Rector claims. In fact, Mr. Austen's introduction states "Obviously,a comprehensive overview of all rock on TV is imposible... No one writer could cover everything and nobody would want to read a book that did."

    Apparently Mr. Rector wanted an encyclopedia of rock on TV, rather than a series of entertaining essays with thought-provoking theses. I'm sorry he didn't get what he wanted, but this was a very worthwhile read.

    Further, I could find no claim in the book "that punk rock only became popular after Fear appeared on Saturday Night Live in 1981." In fact, Austen writes: "After polling more than a hundred musicians, zine editors, and fans active in hardcore, none of them cited Fear's Saturday Night Live appearance as their point of entry into the scene (the most frequently cited TV moment that led pollsters to punk/hardcore was actually Devo on Saturday Night Live in 1978)... One reason may be that very few people were watching SNL at that point... the evidence of its realness--the downtime between songs, the lack of distance between audience and artists, and the imperfect performance--may have been unappealing to those not familiar with the hardcore experience."

    Mr. Rector should talk about the book that exists, not the book he's (for better as well as worse) imagining.

  • This is an extremely well-researched book, although not every subject covered here appeals to me (PARTRIDGE FAMILY, MAKING THE BAND, AMERICAN IDOL). Nevertheless, there's something here for every rock music/TV fan, including a whole chapter on rock `n` roll cartoons! I enjoyed the coverage of Elvis Presley and The Beatles -- two subjects that have been covered to death, but in this case the author offers perceptive insights. While I'm not a fan of Michael Jackson (though I respect his stature in rock music history), the chapter on him is one of the strongest entries in the book. I also appreciated the author's defense of the underrated contributions of The Monkees, as well as his on-target appraisals of TV hosts Steve Allen, Ed Sullivan, Dick Clark, Mike Douglas, Don Cornelius, and Carson Daly.

    In time, rock `n' roll music thrived on television, despite the uneasy alliance between the two. Television has repeatedly sabotaged and diluted the very essence of this rebellious art form. Television has also been responsible for presenting us with many moments of pure gold. TV A-GO-GO does a commendable job of chronicling this facet of music history, examining the legendary, the surprisingly good, the idiosyncratic, and the awful acts (and programs that showcased these acts) that have flashed across television screens for the past five decades.

  • I'm three-quarters of the way through this thing and I still don't know where this author is coming from. Sometimes he seems to embrace the tastes of the supposed masses, other times he puts them down and embraces the aesthetics of the fringes.
    The author also reaches some downright offensive conclusions: according to him, the reaction of the baby-boomer generation to the killing of the four students at Kent State "exposed much of the peace-and-love generation as bandwagon jumpers whose dissidence was merely a fad that they were not willing to die for. Excuse me?
    Plus Mr. Austen, Fanny was not "a lesbian rock group". I don't know where the hell you got that from.

  • My older siblings were into Kenny Loggins and Bread, and when they wanted to rock, it was Elton John, or maybe Queen. But as a wee `un I knew better than to be unduly influenced by their example. Fortunately, I was under the able, personal tutelage of Television (not the Richard Hell kind, the other kind)-Scooby and the gang running from werewolves to a bubblegum soundtrack; 60s superhero rock gods The Impossibles; the Mosquitos on Gilligan's Island and the Bedbugs on F-Troop: if I'd lived above CBGB's in the late 70s, I still woulda yelled down to cut out that noise, the Banana Splits are on! And now, Austen has penned the definitive tome on all things Rock TV. His prose crackles like a man in awe of his subject, and rightfully so; lucid and engaging, TV-A-Go-Go not only has everything and then some inside, but includes-rather than a mere detailing of who-was-on-what-all manner of interesting, cogent theses on culture woven into the text. As important as bubblepop and sillypunk are to the brain (Austen's chapter on punk rock is spot-on, especially his detailing of Fear's 1981 Saturday Night Live performance), most pleasing is the enormous gamut he covers, from early TV to our American Idol age, with chapters on dance shows, fake bands, 70s TV rock, video programs, international stuff, an investigation into how Michael Jackson and TV shaped each other, and my favorite chapter, on black music television, which describes über-rarity The !!! Beat. Plus appendices on international rock TV and a "Rock N' Roll TV Guide" that'll make you drool and shiver. This is one to buy.

  • Jake Austin (publisher of "Rocktober," the finest retro-Rock & Roll magazine since the death of "Kicks") has really done us all a great service with this book. Most of the other reviewers here have already detailed the enlightening and fun to read contents, so I won't belabor the point--except to repeat that it's well-written, extremely entertaining and informative, and an essential addition to any serious Rock & Roll fan's music library. Buy this book now, and if you're lucky enough to ever run across some back issues of "Rocktober," pawn whatever is necessary to get them into your greedy hooks.