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ePub Sound Targets: American Soldiers and Music in the Iraq War download

by Jonathan Pieslak

ePub Sound Targets: American Soldiers and Music in the Iraq War download
Author:
Jonathan Pieslak
ISBN13:
978-0253220875
ISBN:
0253220874
Language:
Publisher:
Indiana University Press; 1st edition (May 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Music
ePub file:
1303 kb
Fb2 file:
1136 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi docx lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
391

Seventeen of the early-filmed scenes from the documentary were used in Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11. The film is mentioned in the 2009 book Sound Targets: American Soldiers and Music in the Iraq War by Jonathan Pieslak.

Pieslak's Sound Targets offers a serious and insightful examination of how music was used by American soldiers in the Iraq Wa. ovember 2009 (Times Higher Education)

Pieslak's Sound Targets offers a serious and insightful examination of how music was used by American soldiers in the Iraq Wa. ovember 2009 (Times Higher Education). I highly recommend this book for all those interested in relationships between artistic expression and politics, war, militarism, and psychology. October, 2009 (Lisa Gilman University of Oregon)

For this book, Jonathan Pieslak interviewed returning veterans to learn about the place of music in the Iraq War and in contemporary American military culture in general.

For this book, Jonathan Pieslak interviewed returning veterans to learn about the place of music in the Iraq War and in contemporary American military culture in general. He studies the role of music from recruitment campaigns and basic training to its use "in country" before and during missions

For this book, Jonathan Pieslak interviewed returning veterans to learn about the place of music in the Iraq War . Though a part of American soldiers' lives since the Revolutionary War, by World War II music could be broadcast to the front. Today, it accompanies soldiers from. Today, it accompanies soldiers from the recruiting office to the battlefield.

Indeed, as Jonathan Pieslak recounts in Sound Targets, his book on the recreational and operational use of music in the Iraq war (2003-4), it was the knowledge that ‘Saddam Hussein liked old American movies’ that inspired US soldiers to blast Wagner’s ‘Ride’ on the outside of their trucks.

Indeed, as Jonathan Pieslak recounts in Sound Targets, his book on the recreational and operational use of music in the Iraq war (2003-4), it was the knowledge that ‘Saddam Hussein liked old American movies’ that inspired US soldiers to blast Wagner’s ‘Ride’ on the outside of their trucks as they attacked Baghdad (85); that and the desire. to persuade the Iraqis that they were ‘freaking insane’. Today it accompanies soldiers from the recruiting office to the battlefield.

Mobile version (beta). Sound Targets: American Soldiers and Music in the Iraq War. Jonathan Pieslak. Download (pdf, . 1 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Jonathan Pieslak is a composer and music scholar living in NY. Also a scholar, Jonathan is the author of Sound Targets: American Soldiers and Music in the Iraq War (ww. oundtargets

Jonathan Pieslak is a composer and music scholar living in NYC. He is an Associate Professor at the City College of New York and Graduate Center, CUNY, where he teaches composition, theory, and music. Stream Tracks and Playlists from Jonathan Pieslak on your desktop or mobile device. oundtargets.

In the field, Pieslak notes, US soldiers in Iraq are often fanatical consumers of music, both in combat and off duty

In the field, Pieslak notes, US soldiers in Iraq are often fanatical consumers of music, both in combat and off duty. Vehicles are decked out with improvised sound systems and loud blasts of metal and rap help to pump up fighters before they go out on patrol. Portable music technology has also helped soldiers to compose music while in Iraq and a surprising number of recordings have been made during the war, including rap, patriotic songs and even one example of contemporary experimental art music.

Though a part of American soldiers' lives since the Revolutionary War, by World War II music could be broadcast to the front. Today it accompanies soldiers from the recruiting office to the battlefield. For this book, Jonathan Pieslak interviewed returning veterans to learn about the place of music in the Iraq War and in contemporary American military culture in general. Pieslak describes how American soldiers hear, share, use, and produce music both on and off duty. He studies the role of music from recruitment campaigns and basic training to its use "in country" before and during missions. Pieslak explores themes of power, chaos, violence, and survival in the metal and hip-hop music so popular among the troops, and offers insight into the daily lives of American soldiers in the Middle East.

  • Sound Targets: American Soldiers and Music in the Iraq War, Jonathan Pieslak, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN, 2009.

    This 225-page lightly illustrated book tells the story of American soldiers in Iraq and their use of music to build their own morale, to destroy the willingness of the enemy to continue the fight, and to weaken the resistance of prisoners during interrogation. I was aware of the author since he had written to me earlier requesting permission to quote some text from my article "The Use of Music in Psychological Operations" in his book.

    Pieslak starts off by mentioning some historical uses of music; the trumpets used by Joshua at the battle of Jericho, General Santa Anna playing El Degüello at the Alamo, and of course the hard rock broadcast at General Noriega in Panama hiding in the Vatican Embassy in Panama. He goes on to discuss Iraq but since he admits that he only interviewed 18 soldiers and several of them were hesitant to talk, he doesn't really get into the subject in great depth. He discusses music in recruiting, in combat, as used by the enemy in Iraq, as a psychological tactic, as a form of soldier expression and then attempts to explain "metal" and "rap" ideologies. Pieslak gives the lyrics of some of the songs and explains that often soldiers about to go into battle will steel themselves with music. In my day we didn't have Ipods, but I do recall that when I was training troops in infantry tactics I would sometimes play "The Ballad of the Green Berets" on the car radio as I drove to the student barracks to get myself fired up. And of course, when I had the soldiers march themselves to class or to chow as part of "drill and ceremonies" I demanded that they do loud "Jody" calls all the way there and back. The more militant and blood-thirsty Jody calls definitely motivated the troops.

    I would have liked a bit more combat operations from the book. More tales of advancing troops playing music and more stories of the music played to captured insurgents to break their will to resist. Unfortunately, most of the soldiers interviewed who admitted taking part in interrogations had been ordered not to discuss such things in order not to give aid to the enemy. We are given some examples, and some of the songs are mentioned, but I must say that I wanted more than just a single chapter on music used in psychological operations. To the author's credit, he does add some intesting data on tunes played by some units about to enter combat in his chapter: "Music as an inspiration for Combat." For those who know little about the use of music by the military, the book is a good starter study.

  • I have had a good time reading this book. The author has taken the time to not fill his book with politics or tactics. But with the feelings of the soldiers in his book. Focusing more on the music then the war. I recommend for those looking for a book about the lives of soldiers and not just the combat that soldiers deal with on a daily basis.