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ePub Being an Actor download

by Simon Callow

ePub Being an Actor download
Author:
Simon Callow
ISBN13:
978-0413524409
ISBN:
041352440X
Language:
Publisher:
Methuen Publishing Ltd; First Edition edition (March 1, 1984)
Category:
Subcategory:
Performing Arts
ePub file:
1312 kb
Fb2 file:
1720 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
917

Few actors are more eloquent, honest or entertaining about their life and their profession than Simon Callow.

Few actors are more eloquent, honest or entertaining about their life and their profession than Simon Callow. Being an Actor traces his stage journey from the letter he wrote to Laurence Olivier that led him to his first job, to his triumph as Mozart in the original production of Amadeus. Callow Few actors are more eloquent, honest or entertaining about their life and their profession than Simon Callow.

Simon Callow is a superb actor, he is also a gifted writer and this books allows readers insight into the art and . Callow is aware of this and expresses his hope in a preface that non-actors will be interested in how acting is done.

Simon Callow is a superb actor, he is also a gifted writer and this books allows readers insight into the art and craft of acting, with all its joys and frustrations. Ten out of ten for honesty but I found the book heavy going and left the show halfway through. There are some interesting parts of and he writes well but the detailed descriptions of acting styles, rehearsals etc. were too much for this non-actor to endure.

Simon Phillip Hugh Callow CBE (born 15 June 1949) is an English actor, musician, writer, and theatre director. Callow was born in Streatham, London, the son of Yvonne Mary (née Guise), a secretary, and Neil Francis Callow, a businessman

Simon Phillip Hugh Callow CBE (born 15 June 1949) is an English actor, musician, writer, and theatre director. Callow was born in Streatham, London, the son of Yvonne Mary (née Guise), a secretary, and Neil Francis Callow, a businessman. His father was of English and French descent and his mother was of Danish and German ancestry. He was raised as a Roman Catholic

Simon Callow is an actor, director and writer

Simon Callow is an actor, director and writer. He has appeared in many films, including the hugely popular Four Weddings and a Funeral, Shakespeare in Love and. Phantom of the Opera. Callow’s books include Being an Actor, Shooting the Actor, a highly acclaimed biography of Charles Laughton, a biographical trilogy of Orson Welles (of which the first two parts have now been published) and his memoir My Life in Pieces. Charles Dickens and the Great Theatre of the World (HarperPress), is published on 7 February 2012.

Город: A stage screen or shelf nearbyПодписчиков: 13 ты. себе: Actor, writer, director. Official twitter feed.

Simon Callow announced his homosexuality to the world in his 1984 book Being an Actor. Callow’s desire to be open about his sexuality was however not the end of the matter

Simon Callow announced his homosexuality to the world in his 1984 book Being an Actor. By doing so his statement preceded that of Chris Smith, Britain’s first openly gay MP, and Ian McKellen who came out roughly four years later. I think I probably was the first well known actor to voluntary come out, Callow tells me, as opposed to being arrested in a public lavatory. Callow’s desire to be open about his sexuality was however not the end of the matter. The press wouldn’t let me come out. When they did interviews with me they’d ask, Do you have a girlfriend? and I would say, No, I’m gay, but they would never write it down.

Actor Simon Callow reads Dickens. When you think of Charles Dickens you think of his authorship - the characters, the stories, the immortality of his literary genius

Actor Simon Callow reads Dickens. When you think of Charles Dickens you think of his authorship - the characters, the stories, the immortality of his literary genius. But a new exhibition celebrates another side to Dickens which we know about but sometimes celebrate less: that's his work as a campaigner and an investigative journalist. British actor Simon Callow has performed in many Dickens plays and will be at the opening of the exhibition today. Listen to him reading A Nightly Scene in London.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition Simon Callow provides a gloomy assessment of the state of British theatre.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Simon Callow provides a gloomy assessment of the state of British theatre. He describes the decline of ensemble playing, a lack of training for young actors and brochure theatre where novelty replaces substance, and warns that without attention to stagecraft, British theatre will surely die. Product Identifiers.

  • The first time I read this book was back in 1983, the year of my graduation from the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama. I read with mounting frustration and envy; 'Why him?!' Thirty years on, the youthful ambition of a new actor has more or less evaporated, replaced with a modulated enjoyment of the craft. Callow's book is quite excellent. The original text remains unchanged and gives a generous, personal account of his beginnings as an actor. The new material presents some close technical analysis of roles, plays, and the state of the profession. His prose is at once compact and eloquent, and what emerges is his love of theatre and dedication to it.

  • Let's start here: I am not an actor. I took an acting class in high school, once, and have read a bare smattering of plays, but generally enjoy a trip to the theatre.

    I am, however, a human being, and Simon Callow herein captures, with beautiful lucidity, aspects of the life experience and gained understandings of a young actor in such a way as to be universally understood.

    His writing style is a delight to read, and the book entire is worth buying for the section on Shakespeare's Sonnets alone!

  • A master at work...

  • What a discovery. Callow is a wonderful and illuminating writer on theater. Looking forward with pleasure to reading soon his books on Welles, Laughton, and more of his autobiographicals.

  • This is refreshingly free of the name-dropping celebrity lists and "funny" stories that are so common in the "autobiographies" (usually ghost written) by actors and other members of showbiz.

    On the other hand, it certainly remains faithful to its title - "Being an Actor" - and I imagine will appeal more to theater and film professionals than the general reader.

    Callow is aware of this and expresses his hope in a preface that non-actors will be interested in how acting is done.

    Ten out of ten for honesty but I found the book heavy going and left the show halfway through.

    There are some interesting parts of and he writes well but the detailed descriptions of acting styles, rehearsals etc. were too much for this non-actor to endure.

    For those interested in more "serious" accounts of an actor's life, I recommend some of Dirk Bogarde's autobiographical series, such as "An Orderly Man" and "Snakes and Ladders".

  • I took a detour (from Anthony Sher's book on playing Lear) to read this lengthier-than-expected "look behind the stage curtains" by Simon Callow. I liked it very much, especially his honesty about how vulnerable it is to live as actors do. Frequently unemployed, for one thing, of which he says, "That’s the hardest: acclaim being followed by unemployment. One feels like a puppy, picked up and fussed over until a new diversion occurs, at which one is summarily dropped back on to the floor... it has a horrible effect on one’s psyche."

    I found the author engaging to read, often amusing, and very insightful about the value of theatre in the first place. He considers it a 50-50 collaboration with the audience to generate a whole new opportunity to consider matters that matter, saying, "Into the auditorium they stream, battered, dislocated, alienated, unhuman -- feeling the loss of their humanity, the erosion of their human parts. Our job is to restore them, to massage or tease or slap the sleeping parts into life again. Above all we address ourselves to the deadened organ, the imagination.... In this sense, every actor has signed an unwritten hippocratic oath."

    I agree, and I think Callow's concept applies to all performing arts. There is something healing and nourishing about the communal campfire-type experience, something he describes as "ancient and new at the same time, which is potentially life-changing but which also reminds us of who and what we are, which binds a group of human beings together for the duration of the evening or afternoon to remind them of the sense of community otherwise dead or forgotten, which massages the tired imagination back to life and celebrates human possibilities in the living shapes of the actors themselves."

    See why I liked this book?