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ePub Sebastião Salgado: Migrations: Humanity in Transition download

by Sebastião Salgado

ePub Sebastião Salgado: Migrations: Humanity in Transition download
Author:
Sebastião Salgado
ISBN13:
978-0893818920
ISBN:
0893818925
Language:
Publisher:
Aperture; First Edition edition (June 15, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Photography & Video
ePub file:
1861 kb
Fb2 file:
1429 kb
Other formats:
mbr docx lrf rtf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
111

Sebastião Salgado: "Migrations" - Продолжительность: 1:14:22 UC Berkeley Events Recommended for you.

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Salgado works on long term, self-assigned projects many of which have been published as books: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers, Migrations, and Genesis. Salgado, Sebastião (2000). Migrations : humanity in transition. The latter three are mammoth collections with hundreds of images each from all around the world Between 2004 and 2011, Salgado worked on Genesis, aiming at the presentation of the unblemished faces of nature and humanity.

First is International Migratio. .There were about 20 million international migrants in the mid-1980s; 50 million by the end of that decade; and more than 120 million today. News travels fast in our global village. The radio and television around the world portray the Western way of life; beautiful, rich and easy to achieve.

In this collection, Sebastião Salgado photographed the moving human populations of the earth

In this collection, Sebastião Salgado photographed the moving human populations of the earth. Across the globe, people move to flee war and poverty, to seek work, or to avoid famine or drought. Salgado photographs the conditions they're fleeing, the route they take and where they end up.

In Migrations, Sebastião Salgado turns his attention to the staggering phenomenon of mass migration. Photographs taken over seven years across more than 35 countries document the epic displacement of the world's people at the close of the twentieth century. Wars, natural disasters, environmental degradation, explosive population growth and the widening gap between rich and poor have resulted in over one hundred million international migrants, a number that has doubled in a decade.

Sebastião Salgado, Brazilian photojournalist whose work powerfully . He won the City of Paris/Kodak Award for his first photographic book, Other Americas (1986), which recorded the everyday lives of Latin.

Sebastião Salgado, Brazilian photojournalist whose work powerfully expresses the suffering of the homeless and downtrodden. Salgado was the only son of a cattle rancher who wanted him to become a lawyer. Instead, he studied economics at São Paulo University, earning a master’s degree in 1968. He won the City of Paris/Kodak Award for his first photographic book, Other Americas (1986), which recorded the everyday lives of Latin American peasants.

Sebastiao Salgado: Children by Sebastiao Salgado (English) Hardcover Book Free . A Desert on Fire: Kuwait, a Desert on Fire by Sebasti. SIGNED Sebastiao Salgado Migrations Humanity in Transition Caption Booklet PB.

Migrations Sebastiao Salgado Softcover Aperture.

Migrations : Humanity in Transition. by Sebastião Salgado. Exhibited across the globe, from Brazil to Paris and Germany to New York, Sebasti?o Salgado's photographs continue to tour and to transform the perceptions of those who view them

Migrations : Humanity in Transition. Exhibited across the globe, from Brazil to Paris and Germany to New York, Sebasti?o Salgado's photographs continue to tour and to transform the perceptions of those who view them.

Sebastião Salgados, Belo Horizonte (Belo Horizonte, Brazil).

InMigrations, SebastiÑo Salgado turns his attention to the staggering phenomenon of mass migration. Photographs taken over seven years across more than thirty-five countries document the epic displacement of the world's people at the close of the twentieth century. Wars, natural disasters, environmental degradation, explosive population growth, and the widening gap between rich and poor have resulted in over one hundred million international migrants, a number that has doubled in a decade. This demographic change, unparalleled in human history, presents profound challenges to the notions of nation, community, and citizenship. The first extensive pictorial survey of the current global flux of humanity, Migrations follows Latin Americans entering the United States, Jews leaving the former Soviet Union, Africans traveling into Europe, Kosovars fleeing into Albania, and many others. The images address suffering while revealing the dignity and courage of the subjects. With his unique vision and empathy, Salgado gives us a picture of the enormous social and political transformations now occurring in a world divided between excess and need.
  • What a book. The other reviewers capture the breadth and power of the images, so I'll focus on the book itself.

    I'm reviewing the first edition hardcover published by Aperture. It's a high quality edition, and in my opinion preferable to the later paperback edition. The printing and binding is excellent and the reproduction of the images is strong. Aperture always impresses with their attention to detail. It's a vertical format book, and some images are split across the spine, but I found it less distracting than in "Genesis" - perhaps this is due to the binding.

    The book is large-format and nearly matches Saldado's "Workers" hardcover exactly. They make a good pair on the shelf. If you're a Salgado fan and wonder about the switch from Aperture to Taschen for Genesis - the Taschen volume is slightly taller, so it doesn't appear a companion to "Migrations" and "Workers."

    Lastly, the book includes a caption booklet/pamphlet which is folded in to the end page - it includes location and information on every image in the book.

    ***If anyone would consider taking photos of the caption booklet and sharing them, I would greatly appreciate it. My copy does not include that booklet and I'd love to print it out on my own and fold it in*** Thanks.

  • What a subperb exhibition of the world's people on the move. I was fortunate enough to see the first exhibit of the Photography Exhibit that makes up this book when it was in Portugal in May/June, 2000. There, the book, along with the exhibit, is entitled "Exodos", and no more evocative book or exhibit is there.
    Sebastio Selgato has truly outdone himself with this book--indeed, a masterpiece. Selgato, in my opinion, is the world's finest photojournalist to begin with, but "Migrations" not only is an extension of is past work, but actually surpasses it.
    The composition and imagery is outstanding and the printing done by masters. I understand that Selgado does not do his own printing, but works with a team of printers. They did a splendid job printing some of the most evocative images I have yet to see.

  • For anyone that wants a photographic window on the psychological and social condition of the world's poor, especially those that are homeless or displaced from their original homes, "Migrations" is an indispensable book. "Migrations" is similar to "Workers", Salgado's 1993 book, but somehow is even more emotionally intense as "Migrations" subjects live even more precariously. The geographic span is even larger, ranging across Asia, Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, and selected shots of Europe and North America.
    Salgado, a former economist who worked briefly for the World Bank and the IMF, but left to become a photographer because he thought he could do more for the world's poor through photography, has undoubtedly succeeded. It is hard to imagine a more powerful statement than his photographs. I was fortunate enough to see the exhibit of these photographs at the Museum of the Universe in Rio de Janeiro the day before the exhibit closed, August 5, 2000. I also saw a slide show of "Migrations" set to music in the museum's planetarium. I was overcome by any of the photographs and moved to tears.
    I was fortunate enough to meet Salgado during a lecture he gave during the exhibit of "Workers" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1993. While I cannot pretend to know a person after one brief meeting, he struck me as humble, brilliant, and perceptive, just like his photographs. Several centuries from now we will look at Salgado's photographs like we now look at Rembrandt's self-portraits: searing, penetrating images into the depths of the human soul.

  • The book live up to its reputation.

  • Item in good conditions

  • Without doubt Sebastiao Salgado is one of the greatest living photographers of our time. "Migrations" is the first book I bought after having seen his most interesting video tape "Looking Back at You".
    In fact a most touching document on the migrations of people from all over the world-- having to escape from their native land to avoid being tortured or killed.
    Apart from the technical excellence and quality Salgado's black and white photography has a certain magic about it that strongly reminds me of the work of photography greats like W. Eugene Smith or Henri Cartier-Bresson. However I have to admit that Salgado clearly has become my personal favorite. Being a photographer myself I highly admire Salgado's talent to produce such phantastic images of people in deep distress--showing things as they are, without having his subjects losing their dignity.
    Some time ago a world famous photographer said that "...you can't photograph soul...". After looking at Salgado's work I think that's definitely not true.
    This book clearly is a must have for every photography lover with special interest in black and white journalistic work. Can it get any better? This was my first Salgado book and it won't be my last...