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by Bruce Barnbaum

ePub The Essence of Photography: Seeing and Creativity download
Author:
Bruce Barnbaum
ISBN13:
978-1937538514
ISBN:
1937538516
Language:
Publisher:
Rocky Nook; 1 edition (November 20, 2014)
Category:
Subcategory:
Photography & Video
ePub file:
1503 kb
Fb2 file:
1704 kb
Other formats:
rtf azw mobi txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
933

Bruce Barnbaum, of Granite Falls, WA, began photography as a hobbyist in the 1960s, and after five decades, it is still his hobby. Bruce’s two Tone Poems books are a collaboration of photography and accompanying music.

Bruce Barnbaum, of Granite Falls, WA, began photography as a hobbyist in the 1960s, and after five decades, it is still his hobby. Photography has also been his life’s work for the past 50 years. Bruce’s educational background includes Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in mathematics from UCLA. On musical CDs packaged with each book, pianist Judith Cohen―performing solos as well as with other musicians in duets and trios―matches the mood of the imagery found in each book with carefully chosen classical music.

Bruce Barnbaum, of Granite Falls, WA, began photography as a hobbyist in the 1960s, and after four and a half decades, it is still his hobby. The Essence of Photography, released in 2015, is now in its second printing. Photography has also been his life’s work for the past 45 years. This non-technical book delves deeply into the heart of turning photography from an instrument of recording images to one of making artistic personal statements; progressing from the scene you encountered, to how you feel about the scene you encountered, and then onto how to express that feeling to others.

The Essence of Photography book. In this book, best-selling author and world-renowned photographer and teacher Bruce Barnbaum explores these seldom-discussed issues by drawing upon his personal experiences and observations from more than 40 years of photographing and teaching. In addition to photographs, Bruce also uses painting, music, and writing, as well as the sciences and even business, to provide pertinent examples of creative thinking.

To the contrary, Bruce has proven that photographic seeing and creativity can be taught, learned, and improved

To the contrary, Bruce has proven that photographic seeing and creativity can be taught, learned, and improved. This book expands on the ideas that are central to Bruce's method of teaching photography, which he has used in workshops for the past 41 years. Bruce Barnbaum, of Granite Falls, WA, began photographing as a hobbyist in the 1960s, and after four decades, it is still his hobby. Photography has also been his life’s work for the past 44 years.

The Essence of Photography - Bruce Barnbaum. The Essence of Photography. Seeing and Creativity. Bruce Barnbaum, ww. arnbaum. Publisher: Gerhard Rossbach. Layout and Type: Petra Strauch, hello-in-print. My intent in my Seeing and Creating workshops, and now in this book, is to promote good seeing, to promote personal intuition, and to promote creativity. If it actually teaches any of those things, so much the better. I won’t make the claim that it does, but I’ll cling to the hope that it may. I approach those workshops, as well as this book, as more of a facilitator than an instructor.

Bruce Barnbaum's The Essence of Photography draws on Bruce’s decades of experience in producing his own personal .

Bruce Barnbaum's The Essence of Photography draws on Bruce’s decades of experience in producing his own personal work, his years of producing commercial work, and his decades of teaching workshops to give you insights into how to produce a creative mindset ending up in producing truly good photographs. Picking up a camera and shooting does not make you a photographer any more than picking up a pencil and writing makes you a writer. You have to work at both, and this book helps you do it with photography.

Author: Bruce Barnbaum. Softcover, 196 Pages. Published November 2014. The Essence of Photography: Seeing and Creativity from Rocky Nook is an in-depth guide that covers how the ideas of seeing and creativity apply to photography

Author: Bruce Barnbaum. The Essence of Photography: Seeing and Creativity from Rocky Nook is an in-depth guide that covers how the ideas of seeing and creativity apply to photography. As every photographer knows, there is more to taking memorable photos than simply pointing the camera at something and pressing the shutter button. Creating a great photograph requires thought and preparation, an understanding of the photographic process, and a firm grasp of how light, composition, and timing affect a photo.

The Essence of Photography. These examples serve as stepping-stones that will lead you to your own heightened ability to see and be creative

The Essence of Photography. There is a lot more to photography than simply picking up a camera, pointing it toward something, and tripping the shutter. These examples serve as stepping-stones that will lead you to your own heightened ability to see and be creative. Creativity is a topic that is almost wholly ignored in formal education because most instructors think that it cannot be taught or learned. To the contrary, Bruce has proven that photographic seeing and creativity can be taught, learned, and improved.

The Essence of Photography : Seeing and Creativity. By (author) Bruce Barnbaum.

There is a lot more to photography than simply picking up a camera, pointing it toward something, and tripping the shutter. Achieving a great photograph requires thought and preparation, an understanding of the photographic process, and a firm grasp of how light and composition affect a photo. There must be personal involvement and personal expression. There must be experimentation, with the recognition that only a small percentage of experiments end successfully.In this book, best-selling author and world-renowned photographer and teacher Bruce Barnbaum explores these seldom-discussed issues by drawing upon his personal experiences and observations from more than 40 years of photographing and teaching. In addition to photographs, Bruce also uses painting, music, and writing, as well as the sciences and even business, to provide pertinent examples of creative thinking. These examples serve as stepping-stones that will lead you to your own heightened ability to see and be creative.Creativity is a topic that is almost wholly ignored in formal education because most instructors think that it cannot be taught or learned. To the contrary, Bruce has proven that photographic seeing and creativity can be taught, learned, and improved. This book expands on the ideas that are central to Bruce's method of teaching photography, which he has used in workshops for the past 41 years.Included in the book are in-depth discussions on the following topics:

Defining your own unique rhythm and approach as a photographerHow to translate the scene in front of you to the final photographThe differences and similarities between how an amateur and a professional approach photographyThe differences between realism and abstraction, and the possibilities and limitations of eachLearning to expand your own seeing and creativity through classes, workshops, and associating with other photographersWhy the rules of composition should be ignoredHow to follow your passionWhen to listen to the critics and when to ignore themThe book is richly illustrated with over 90 photographs taken by Bruce as well as other photographers.Seeing and creativity are difficult to teach, but not impossible. This very different, perhaps groundbreaking book is sure to inspire photographers of all skill levels-from beginners to seasoned professionals-to think deeply about the issues involved in creating successful photographs.
  • Most photo books describe how to take photos under varying conditions. Bruce Bamabum goes into making personal images, not by learning new techniques but by learning our own inclinations and, to use a currently trendy term, voice (my term - not the author's). Techniques and composition are mentioned throughout but not as ends in themselves. Rather both are put in service to personal vision and voice. As a friend of mine, Ray Ketcham says, "Anybody can learn your technique. Only you can make pictures that reflect your voice." For instance, we don't need to learn the rule of thirds to make "properly composed" images but because photos composed that way have certain impacts on the viewer. Is that what we want from a particular photo? Composition rules become composition tools in the service of how we want the image to display. Technical knowledge is always put in service to improving our craft not as an end in itself. Throughout the book Bambaum repeats the notion that photography is a skill and as with any skill practice, experimentation and making bad photos are necessary. Bad photos are not a negative, just something to learn from and if we don't make bad photos we haven't pushed out of our comfort zones. He makes the point that many of the worst photos he sees in workshops come from working pros who get into the habit of making commercially acceptable pictures not ones that reflect their vision. They forget how to experiment and take chances.

    Bambaum covers more than just technique, though. He emphasizes getting instruction from multiple instructors and workshops (we learn different stuff from each), getting feedback or critiques of your photos and how to take that feedback, as well as how to learn from classes and such. Yes, there is a section on technique and gear, as well as a discussion of printing. Yes, again, those are put in service to making personal images not as absolutes or must haves.

    Much of the book is relayed through the author's personal history. At times it's a tiny bit tedious but I don't know any other way to talk about personal process than personally. Bambaum shows a lot of his own photos. They are not all his most commercially successful images, rather ones that mean something to him and illustrate his points. That means that they may not all wow you, say, the way Joe McNally does. That's part of the essence of photography, too.

  • This is a hard one to review. The author is an acknowledge master of fine art photography, and if you aspire to improve your own fine art photography, there are some excellent tips in this book. In my opinion, however, it is a niche book. It details the author's story of how he got into photography, and why he prefers large format cameras (4X5 sheet film). Notbing wrong with that. He also details his preferred methods and techniques for taking/making fine art photographs, and his pictures are beyond reproach. What let's it down a bit is his obvious distain for any other form of photography. Not everyone is going to shoot scenics or abstracts, and haul around a van full of equipment, and take the time to set up each and every photograph with care and precision that the author feels is necessary. It is excellent to be reminded to check everything with extreme care, but most of us will shoot (and should shoot) more than the 3-4 snaps a week or whatever.

    I began years ago trying to shoot pictures for a newspaper of football and basketball games with a 4X5 Speedgraphic. Great for fine art stuff, but horrendous for sports. We did this because the sports editor - still living in the 1930s and 1940s era, wanted large negatives for "quality." After a couple of years and LOTS of complaining by the staff, the old boy finally retired, and we got some 35 mm cameras with film drives. Our photography improved dramatically.

    Finally, the author seems almost angry at times because everyone does not shoot as he does. He also seems determined to try at every turn to assure the reader that "good" photography is difficult, takes years to learn, takes incredable dedication to the exclusion of almost everything else, and you probably won't make it anyway. It would be nice to get a glimmer of encouragement occassionally. The author does recognize that some of the newer cameras might be used to take a descent picture - if you do all the painstaking work and take only a small number of shots - so you don't have to "dig through all that manuer assuming there is a pony in there someplace," and of course, go back to 4X5 film photography every month or so to refresh your techniques.

    The author makes some wonderful photographs, but his technique and equipment are still from the 1940s era of Ansel Adams, and to that he aspires. For him there seems little room for anything else. I found this book hard to read. He seems almost angry that others would consider any other form of photography. It seems less about teaching others to make great photographs than about justifying the author's way of making them. However, if you aspire to make photographs like Ansel Adams or Bruce Barnbuam, and have the dedication to try, you should get this book, but do not expect anything but a very narrow "fine art" with large format perspective. Maybe that's the point, but...

  • This is a go-to book that has been an inspiration as well as informative. This book will make you think as you slowly read and comprehend it's contents. Whenever I take some time out to read, I can't wait to break out the gear to put into practice what I've learned. I always keep the volume handy so I can reach for it when I have a free minute. My personal opinion is that this is one of the finest volumes written on the subject. It should be a prerequisite for any beginning course in photography.

  • Very thoughtful and inspiring book. Each photographer will need to decide what to take from it -- but there is a great deal there.

  • Not everyone's cup of tea but I enjoyed it and will keep it on my Kindle to read again. Barnbaum does get a little on his high horse because of his environmental stance but I did not let that bother me. As a former newspaper photographer, I had been looking for something to inspire me and my photography again. I will read it again and try to digest more of it.

  • Got this as a gift and it looked great. The teacher still gave me an A- though so if I could take it back I would.

  • Interesting and very well written. Every word written has resonated and remains with me. One of the best books on the meaning and soul of photography that I have read thus far. Just ordered his Art of Photography and I hope I enjoy it as much and learn as much as with his Essence of Photography.

  • as advertised