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ePub Oracles of God: Perceptions of Ancient Prophecy in Israel after the Exile download

by John Barton

ePub Oracles of God: Perceptions of Ancient Prophecy in Israel after the Exile download
Author:
John Barton
ISBN13:
978-0195207149
ISBN:
0195207149
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (October 20, 1988)
Category:
Subcategory:
Bible Study & Reference
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1464 kb
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1273 kb
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Oracles of God is a study of ideas about ancient prophecy current in Judaism and Christianity from the Exile to the end of the New Testament period.

Oracles of God is a study of ideas about ancient prophecy current in Judaism and Christianity from the Exile to the end of the New Testament period.

John Barton FBA (born 17 June 1948) is a British Anglican priest and biblical scholar. Oracles of God: Perceptions of Ancient Prophecy in Israel after the Exile. London: Darton, Longman & Todd. From 1991 to 2014, he was the Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Oriel College. In addition to his academic career, he has been an ordained and serving priest in the Church of England since 1973. It examines the prophetic section of the Old Testament canon in both Hebrew and Greek traditions, the various pictures of prophets, their role and message, and looks at the various ways in which prophetic scripture were read in the period. Source material discussed includes much apocryphal and pseudepigraphical writing, documents from Qumran, the works of Philo and Josephus, the New Testament and some rabbinic literature

Examining perceptions of ancient Hebrew prophecy current in Judaism and Christianity from the time of the Exile to the end of the New Testament period, this book.

Examining perceptions of ancient Hebrew prophecy current in Judaism and Christianity from the time of the Exile to the end of the New Testament period, this book.

Oracles of God: Perceptions of Ancient Prophecy in Israel after the Exile. London, Darton, Longman and Todd, 1986. Pp. xii + 324. £12·95. Robert P. Carroll (a1). University of Glasgow. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 02 February 2009.

Channels of Prophecy: The Social Dynamics of Prophetic Activity.

Ethics in Ancient Israel is a study of ethical thinking in ancient Israel from around the eighth to the second century BC. The evidence for this consists primarily of the Old Testament/ Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha, but also other ancient Jewish writings such as the Dead Sea Scrolls an. . The evidence for this consists primarily of the Old Testament/ Hebrew Bible and Apocrypha, but also other ancient Jewish writings such as the Dead Sea Scrolls and various anonymous and pseudonymous texts from shortly before the New Testament period.

John Barton is Oriel & Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture, University of Oxford. His publications include The Theology of the Book of Amos (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Oracles of God: Perceptions of Ancient Prophecy in Israel after the Exile (2007). Start reading Ethics in Ancient Israel on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

John Barton is Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture, Emeritus at Oxford .

John Barton is Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture, Emeritus at Oxford University and an Emeritus Fellow of Oriel College, as of 2014.

Examining perceptions of ancient Hebrew prophecy current in Judaism and Christianity from the time of the Exile to the end of the New Testament period, this book throws fresh light on the development of the Prophetic section of the Old Testament canon in both the Hebrew and Greek traditions. Drawing on documents including the Old Testament itself, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, the New Testament, the writings of Philo and Josephus, and the works of the early Church Fathers, Barton arrives at a series of controversial conclusions about the composition of the canon in the post-exilic period, the relation of "apocalyptic" to prophecy, and even the applicability of the term "prophet" to the classical prophets themselves.