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ePub The Gospel of Mark: Interpreting Biblical Texts Series download

by Lynda Sue Juel

ePub The Gospel of Mark: Interpreting Biblical Texts Series download
Author:
Lynda Sue Juel
ISBN13:
978-0687008490
ISBN:
0687008492
Language:
Publisher:
Abingdon Press (October 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Bible Study & Reference
ePub file:
1923 kb
Fb2 file:
1655 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit docx mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
150

The Gospel of Mark book. I liked seeing Juel's take on Mark, especially his discussion of tearing of the curtain in connection with Jesus' baptism

The Gospel of Mark book. I liked seeing Juel's take on Mark, especially his discussion of tearing of the curtain in connection with Jesus' baptism. I also was interested in the discussion of the different endings of Mark and Juel's take on the historicity of these endings. Overall, it certainly deepened my view of Mark's Gospel and gave me a new theological point of view on this telling of Jesus' life.

The Gospel of Mark: Interpreting Biblical Texts Series.

The Gospel of Mark: Interpreting Biblical Texts Series Lynda Sue Juel. Building on her previous work on the Gospel, she concentrates on the 'narrative flow' as she traces the way in which Mark's story develops as a story in five acts. -Morna D. Hooker, University of Cambridge.

The Historical Books: Interpreting Biblical Texts Series. This volume focuses on the Gospel according to Mark, probably the first of the four Gospels to be written.

224 pages, softcover, Abingdon. The Historical Books: Interpreting Biblical Texts Series. It has received the least attention of the four in the history of the church. The explosion of Markan scholarship in the last decades tells a fascinating story that is not the focus of this study but informs it.

This volume is written for anyone who-for whatever reason-is drawn to the New Testament. It is also for those who are. Anyone can read the Bible; no particular level of education is required, but readers need to learn what to look for in stories that may seem distant and strange. The long tradition of reading the Scriptures in the church is not the enemy in such an enterprise, but audiences change, and the Bible must be heard and wrestled with in each new situation.

While I think the title overstates the books emphasis on surprise, I enjoyed reading Professor Juel's rhetorical analysis of the Gospel of Mark. The book is organized into three major sections with about 30 pages committed to providing minimal context and background to support Professor Juel's intriguing analysis. Having read methods books, I concur with the author that this is not a methods book even if it does include some methods background.

A Master of Surprise: Mark Interpreted. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1994. Yet others believe that they were faithful reporters of the events that had been handed down to them and that they did very little to modify that message. B. Author Concerning the author of the Gospel of Mark, scholarship possesses little evidence external to the Gospel itself.

Catholic Biblical Quarterly Monograph Series 6. Washington, DC: Catholic Biblical . Washington, DC: Catholic Biblical Association, 1977. Breytenbach, Cilliers. Nachfolge und Zukunftserwartung nach Markus: Eine methodenkritische Studie. Gamble, Harry . ooks and Readers in the Early Church: A History of Early Christian Texts. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.

Interpreting Biblical Texts. Juel, Donald H. The Gospel of Mark. Fretheim, Terence . Tucker, Gene . Cousar, Charles B. The Pentateuch. IBT. Abingdon Press, 1999. Ranking Mark : ranked 26. Spencer, F. Scott. The Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles. Abingdon Press, 2008.

This volume is written for anyone who--for whatever reason--is drawn to the New Testament. It is also for those who are not so drawn, for it is written out of the conviction that good readers need to be formed. Anyone can read the Bible; no particular level of education is required, but readers need to learn what to look for in stories that may seem distant and strange. The long tradition of reading the Scriptures in the church is not the enemy in such an enterprise, but audiences change, and the Bible must be heard and wrestled with in each new situation.

This volume focuses on the Gospel according to Mark, probably the first of the four Gospels to be written. It has received the least attention of the four in the history of the church. The explosion of Markan scholarship in the last decades tells a fascinating story that is not the focus of this study but informs it. The result of intense engagement with Mark within and outside the academic community has not achieved a meeting of the minds. Mark’s Gospel does not easily yield its secrets. It is the case, however, that conversing about Mark has been enormously interesting and productive for the church as well as the academy. This volume is written to open readers to its remarkable story. Where engagement will finally lead remains as unpredictable and as promising as the Gospel itself.

  • Don Juel's book on the Gospel of Mark will be very helpful to those reading and preaching Mark in this Year B. Juel's work serves both as an introduction to reading the New Testament and a companion to viewing the Gospel of Mark as a self-contained narrative. What I enjoyed most about the work was the way that Juel both explained the narrative strategies of the evangelist and suggested greater theological possibilities. The best example of this is his chapter on "The Death of Jesus and the Will of God" that is both lucid and spellbinding. Juel's overall thesis that Mark defies our desire to have neat theological and pious interpretations of scripture has filled me with a new understanding and appreciation of the gospel. (By "gospel" I mean both the evangelist Mark's work, and the good news of the Holy Gospel itself). If you want to go deeper in this under-rated and enjoyable book of the Bible you have no better guide than this book.

  • Proffessor of NT theology at Princeton, Donald Juel gives us a basic introduction to the Markan gospel and its issues. His style is clear and verbose. And it is a real shame that the work is so small and not a verse by verse commentary. The format is topical and the tone is popular.
    I found myself in agreement with most of his conclusions. You might be better off purchasing this work in the used section.
    Rick E Aguirre.
    Reader in New Testament Studies Southern California.