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ePub The Oracles of God: The Old Testament Canon download

by Andrew Steinmann

ePub The Oracles of God: The Old Testament Canon download
Author:
Andrew Steinmann
ISBN13:
978-0570042822
ISBN:
0570042828
Language:
Publisher:
Concordia Publishing (October 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Bible Study & Reference
ePub file:
1617 kb
Fb2 file:
1354 kb
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
691

Andrew E. Steinmann is Distinguished Professor of Theology and Hebrew at Concordia University Chicago. He has authored a dozen books and numerous articles relating to Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, Biblical Hebrew, and Biblical Aramaic.

Andrew E.

The Oracles of God book. by. Andrew E. Steinmann. The Oracles of God surveys the history of the formation of the Old Testament canon

The Oracles of God book. The Oracles of God surveys the history of the formation of the Old Testament canon. The author investigates the evidence from early Judaism and early Christianity from 200 . to the post-Constantinian church. Surveys the history of the formation of the Hebrew Bible. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Oracles of God: The Old Testament Canon. Andrew Steinmann.

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His publications include books on the Old Testament canon, biblical chronology, Hebrew and Aramaic grammar .

Among his major conclusions were that the canon existed as a collection from before the time of Christ, that it was originally considered to be a collection of authoritative and divinely inspired books kept in the.

With The Oracles of God, Lutheran pastor and professor of Old Testament at Ashland University, Andrew Steinmann, has made a fresh and invaluable contribution to an important and much-debated.

With The Oracles of God, Lutheran pastor and professor of Old Testament at Ashland University, Andrew Steinmann, has made a fresh and invaluable contribution to an important and much-debated topic-the dating and assembling of the Old Testament canon. By a comprehensive examination of Jewish, Christian, and secular sources, Dr. Steinmann convincingly argues that the widely accepted view that the Old Testament canon developed in three divisions (Torah, Prophets, Writings) is based on late evidence.

Andrew Steinmann, P. Called to be God’s People: An Introduction to the Old Testament, 2006. The Oracles of God, 1999. Distinguished Professor of Theology and Hebrew. College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Steinmann teaches Hebrew I and II, Hebrew Readings, Readings in Hebrew, Introduction to the Old Testament, History of Israel, Wisdom Writings, The Pentateuch and The Psalms. Fundamental Biblical Aramaic, 2004. Is God Listening? 2004. Member of the Translation Oversight Committee of the Christian Standard Bible (2011-present). Evangelical Theological Society.

Andrew Steinmann is Distinguished Professor of Theology and Hebrew at Concordia University . The Oracles of God Feb 25, 2000.

Andrew Steinmann is Distinguished Professor of Theology and Hebrew at Concordia University Chicago where he has taught since 2001. Steinmann holds a PhD from the University of Michigan and is an ordained pastor in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. In addition, he is a regular guest on the radio program Issues, Etc. In September 2011 he was named to the Translation Oversight Committee for the Christian Standard Bible. by Andrew E Steinmann.

The Oracles of God. The Old Testament Canon by Andrew E. The Old Testament in Syriac According to the Peshitta Version: Part IV, Fascicle 2. Chronicles by P. B. Dirksen (pp. 574-575). The Oracles of God. Steinmann (pp. 573-574). Dirksen. temple in Jerusalem, and that the later Jewish and Christian organizations of the canon were developments from a more simple two-part organization of Law (Pentateuch) and Prophets.

The Oracles of God surveys the history of the formation of the Old Testament canon. The author investigates the evidence from early Judaism and early Christianity from 200 B.C. to the post-Constantinian church. He argues that the canon was originally a collection of holy and authoritative books in the Persian period and was formed and standardized over the course of the centuries. This book provides a thorough introduction to the history of the Old Testament canon and a solid contribution to scholarship on the Hebrew Scriptures in the ancient world.
  • This book is an unqualified delight for anyone who is interested in the formation, development, and history of the Old Testament canon. I have read more than a dozen books on the canon(s) of Hebrew and Christian Scriptures and, over the last few years, have twice taught a 12–week Bible Class on the topic, drawing from multiple sources. Somehow, I had missed discovering this gem until recently (2015), even though it was published in 2000. I wish I had discovered it long ago — I would have devoured it gratefully and relied on it heavily. For the beginner who is seriously interested in the canon of Scripture, this is one of the first two or three books to read — it is foundational and indispensible, while eminently accessible and readable. And the intermediate student of the canon, as well, will be highly satisfied by its incisive, extremely–well–organized, fresh approach.

    Any study of the formation and history of the canon is plagued by the incomplete puzzle of historical evidence, especially for the OT. Most authors in this area have been the victims of their own presuppositions, whether theologically liberal (tending toward late dates of canon formation) or conservative (preferring traditional, earlier dating). While tackling all the usual issues and, generally, coming to the more conservative conclusions, Dr. Steinmann’s scholarship is strikingly objective and clear–eyed.

    Most other canon commentators, to a greater or lesser degree, anachronistically impose later evidence to draw conclusions about earlier activity; they impose later definitions and perspectives on the nature of the canon to search for earlier canon activity that actually occurred under different, earlier “rules” or norms; they look for evidence of canon formation (extremely hard to find) instead of evidence for the recognition and use of an already–existing canon (extant and discernable, if not abundant); and they selectively cherry–pick among the available evidence to conform their conclusions to their pre–existing worldview. For example, many other commentators look at the evidence of rabbinic and Talmudic writings of the 2nd–4th Centuries AD and use those either to support or discredit what they believe the canon looked like (or didn’t) in the BC era.

    Instead of looking backward through a later lens, Dr. Steinmann carefully and cogently takes a chronological approach. Starting in the Persian era (c. 400 BC), he looks at the earliest evidence first, considers what conclusions reasonably may be drawn for each time period, and frankly acknowledges gaps in the surviving evidence. He reasonably corrects other commentators who can’t find an earlier canon because they can’t find “lists” or tables of contents that are “closed” and final, while, objectively, there is plenty of evidence of well–defined collections, especially those located in the Second Temple, the contents of which were well–known and accepted, and didn’t need listing or argumentation.

    Dr. Steinmann’s presentation is concise; his language is winsome; his perspective is fresh. His use of numerous flow–charts to summarize his evidence and conclusions is visually engaging and provides maximum clarity. He presents a new theory of canon development and history that, flowing logically from the evidence, seems like it should have been obvious to any and all previous authors who had any desire for objectivity and accuracy.

    I give this book the highest possible recommendation. For anyone with an interest in the formation, development, and history of the OT canon, this book should be in your library and form an indispensible trilogy with “The Canon of Scripture” by F. F. Bruce and “The Canon of the New Testament: Its Origin, Development, and Significance” by Bruce M. Metzger. It also serves well as an introduction (and occasionally corrective) to “The Old Testament Canon of the New Testament Church” by Roger T. Beckwith. Buy, read, and enjoy!

  • Dr. Steinmann enters the "canon debate" with straight forward facts. He does not muse on the various developmental or evolutionary theories of canonical formation. He begins with the texts and the early evidence available to us. As he states in his introduction, "This study addresses the historical question of the OT canon" (14) Throughout the book he seeks to answer what is meant by "canon"; when was the canon theoretically 'closed'; and what pattern or process guided these various decisions.

    For Steinmann, "'canon' will mean a collection of authoritative and divinely inspired books accepted as such by an overwhelming majority in a religious community" (18).

    Steinmann rejects the common "Triple Canon Theory", supported notably by Lee McDonald. He shows how already in the late 1960's the Jamnia (Jabneh) theory was proven hallow. Steinmann argues for a practically closed canon of "Law and Prophets" early in Israel's history, perhaps even in the Persian period (192), but a theoretically closed canon after the fall of the second temple (a.d. 70).

    The evidence Steinmann marshals covers texts from the Apocrypha, Qumran, and various first century (a.d. and b.c.) texts (i.e. Philo and Josephus). He then goes into the NT and early church fathers, both east and west. Again, he simply lets the evidence speak for itself.

    Though over a decade old now, this book should be picked up again today especially in light of Concordia Publishing House's new publication of the Apopcrypha. No doubt our laity will be/are already asking all sorts of questions about how this group of books fits into the 'canon' of Scripture--or does it? Steinmann's book on the canon will helpfully guide our reception both of the Apocrypha, and also any new archeological finds, such as the latest "Jesus' Wife" fragment. For the Christian, we are, as St. Paul says in Romans 3:2, "entrusted with the oracles of God." Steinmann is convinced this means those books corresponding to the Hebrew Bible; and with him are Jerome and Luther--not such bad company! I highly recommend this book for any Christian today seriously thinking through the various canon debates.

  • Andrew E. Steinmann, Lutheran Pastor at Lutheran Home in Westlake, OH and Adjunct Professor at Ashland University takes the reader through a detailed examination of the evidence for the `canon' of the Old Testament, that is, what was included or excluded and when. Was it as early as 500BCE or as late as 200CE? and who were the people or institutions responsible for deciding this? Steinmann examines evidence in Hebrew, Greek and Aramaic from Jewish and Christian sources including the Talmud, Josephus, extant documents from the Qumran Caves and various Councils from 100 through 400 CE. The method of Steinmann's examination is to use this textual evidence to explain the organization of the Old Testament and to understand the books that were later grouped into the Apocrypha. The text is dense and intellectually challenging, requiring the layman and those unfamiliar with Hebrew and Greek to consult other sources when questioning the author's conclusions. Steinmann's conclusion speaks to a Christian scholarly audience, their scriptural tradition and religious acceptance of the Old Testament and its the Christian order of books. Some illustrations were printed upside down, otherwise, they are clear and readable.
    Miriam Kahn, Columbus, OH