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ePub Nouvelle Théologie - New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II download

by Jürgen Mettepenningen

ePub Nouvelle Théologie - New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II download
Author:
Jürgen Mettepenningen
ISBN13:
978-0567034090
ISBN:
0567034097
Language:
Publisher:
T&T Clark; 1 edition (June 3, 2010)
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Subcategory:
Catholicism
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1797 kb
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1895 kb
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4.3
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Nouvelle Théologie - New Theology book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Nouvelle Théologie - New Theology book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nouvelle Théologie - New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This is an introduction to the most influential movement in Catholic theology in the 20th century which prepared the ground for the Second Vatican Council

Details (if other): Cancel. This is an introduction to the most influential movement in Catholic theology in the 20th century which prepared the ground for the Second Vatican Council. It sheds new light on the theological movement that led up to and inspired the Second Vatican Council and is a most needed contribution to the ongoing heated discussions about the 'hermeneutics of the Council'.

PDF In this book the young Belgian scholar Jürgen Mettepenningen . the Catholic/Protestant schism of the 16th century-it is to the latter schism that Radner. directs his attention.

PDF In this book the young Belgian scholar Jürgen Mettepenningen offers what he calls a al reconstruction of the genesis an. .rgen Mettepenningen, Nouvelle The. ´ologie, New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican ii. London: T & T Clark, 2010. And it is with this schism that modern Christian ecumenism has.

All Products Catalog Stock Books Accompaniment Music DVDs Bibles Gift & Home eBook MP3 Downloads Homeschool Children Fiction Christian Living Software. By: Jurgen Mettepenningen. Quantity: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+. Stock No: WW034101. T&T Clark, 2010, Paperback.

Nouvelle Theologie New Theology. 11 His answer was unequivocal: ‘The nouvelle theologie will lead us back to Modernism. 12 His claim could not have been more pejorative as far as nouvelle theologie was concerned

Nouvelle Theologie New Theology. Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II. Jurgen Mettepenningen. Published by T&T Clark International. 12 His claim could not have been more pejorative as far as nouvelle theologie was concerned. After all, a resurgence of Modernism implied the revival of ‘the collection of all heresies’, as Pope Pius X had. Nouvelle Theologie: Concept and Content. 5. described Modernism in the encyclical Pascendi dominici gregis (1907).

Nouvelle théologie (French for "new theology") is the name commonly used to refer to a school of thought in.Nouvelle Théologie – New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II.

Nouvelle théologie (French for "new theology") is the name commonly used to refer to a school of thought in Catholic theology that arose in the mid-20th century, most notably among certain circles of French and German theologians.

Similar books and articles. Introduction- Interreligious Reading After Vatican II: Scriptural Reasoning, Comparative Theology and Receptive Ecumenism. David F. Ford - 2013 - Modern Theology 29 (4):1-9. Une Herméneutique Pour Vatican II A Hermeneutics for Vatican II. D. Dupont-Fauville - 2012 - Nouvelle Revue Théologique 134 (4):560-579. Le pape François et la synodalité. Evangelii gaudium, nouvelle étape dans la réception de Vatican ii. Luc Forestier - 2015 - Nouvelle Revue Théologique 137 (4):597. Nouvelle Théologie and Sacramental Ontology: A Return to Mystery. Theological Biology the Case for a New Modernism. Kenneth Cauthen - 1991.

This challenging and provocative book reimagines the justification, substance, process . Phasesfaces of the nouvelle theologie prior. Библиографические данные.

This challenging and provocative book reimagines the justification, substance, process, and study of education in open, pluralistic, liberal democratic societies. Hanan Alexander argues that educators need to enable students to embark on a quest for intelligent spirituality, while paying heed to a pedagogy of difference. Nouvelle Théologie - New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II.

By Jürgen Mettepenningen. New York: T&T Clark/Continuum, 2010. Recommend this journal. David G. Schultenover (a1).

Jurgen Mettepenningen. This title offers an introduction to the most influential movement in Catholic theology in the 20th century which prepared the ground for the Second Vatican Council. La nouvelle theologie - New Theology - was the name of one of the most dynamic and fascinating movements within Catholic theology in the 20th century. Although first condemned by Pope Pius XII. in 1946 and later in his encyclical Humani generis in 1950, it became influential in the preparation of the Second Vatican Council.

This is an introduction to the most influential movement in Catholic theology in the 20th century which prepared the ground for the Second Vatican Council. It sheds new light on the theological movement that led up to and inspired the Second Vatican Council and is a most needed contribution to the ongoing heated discussions about the 'hermeneutics of the Council'.
  • Excellent compendium for anyone wishing to become acquainted with the theological activity in the Catholic Church during the first half of the Twentieth Century. It is an indispensable read for anyone wishing to understand the theological background for the Second Vatican Council.

  • With a 28-page bibliography, 40 pages of footnotes, a well-structured analysis and an engaging style, Mettepenningen draws together the events and agents between 1935 and 1960 which have come to be known as "The New Theology" in a compact and well-reasoned presentation.

  • The Catholic Church is celebrating, debating and wrestling over the 50th anniversary of the most important religious event of the 20th century -- for everyone, not just Catholics, not just Christians: Vatican II. Vatican II suffers from a divisive, contentious and battered history of its reception among Catholics (and so confusion among non-Catholics) after it was closed in 1965. No one could have anticipated the impact the radical 1960's would have on how Vatican II would be taken in such widely and wildly different directions. When Pope St. John XXIII called for an Ecumenical Council, he wanted it to embrace two concepts of reform as mutually complementary and informative: "aggiornamento," Italian for "updating," "modernizing," in terms of the Council, bringing the Catholic Church into constructive and critical dialogue with the modern world both within and outside the Church; and the French concept of "ressourcement," a "return to the sources," retrieving the full riches of the Church's past in Scripture, liturgy and the Church Fathers not as museum-pieces, but as offering forgotten or untapped fresh approaches to expressing the Catholic faith which would give a broader approach to the dialogue with the modern world than the century-old neo-scholasticism which dominated Catholic theology during the era of the "Pian Popes" -- from Pope Pius IX to Pope Pius XII. What happened to Pope St. John's irenic and complementary vision both during the council and vociferously in the decades following it was the radical division of Catholicism into "Progressives" who claimed "aggiornamento" as the true "spirit of Vatican II" and "Conservatives / Traditionalists" who staked the claim of orthodox doctrine and practice in the now-dissociated concept of "ressourcement." The Progressive side risked being sucked into the relativism and radical politics of a thoroughly secularized world (secularism is not new; it was the "gospel" of the atheist-anarchist "revolution" of the 1960's and 70's); the Conservative Traditionalists risked the very opposite temptation: repristinating the past and returning the Catholic Church to a "golden age" of the 4th - 12th centuries. And this is where the Catholic Church remains stuck and polarized to this day, dragging down the momentum of Pope St. John Paul II the Great in his vision of a "new evangelization" and making decisions to the vocation of the priesthood a church-political commitment more than a response to ordained pastoral ministry.

    Jurgen Mettepenningen, in this revisionist take on the theological origins of and influences upon Vatican II, seeks to make a "paradigm shift" in how we think about the council and reconnect aggiornamento and ressourcement. Hence the very precise title: "Nouvelle Theologie: New Theology: Inheritor of Modernism, Precursor of Vatican II." His goal is to change our angle of perception in our evaluation of "the meaning of Vatican II" as well as the council's future trajectory.

    "Nouvelle Theologie" literally means "New Theology" in French, but was a loaded term in the period of the 20th century examined in this book, 1935 - 1965 (the book really ends with the close of Pope Pius XII's reign in 1958; the extension to 1965 and so inclusive of Vatican II is a concluding evaluation). To understand why, one needs to have at least a basic grasp of the convoluted history of Catholic theology in the 19th century, the origins of the theology of "Development of Doctrine" (which made theology an historical-critical task and not a speculative-philosophical one), the reaction against Enlightenment Rationalism's enduring effect on Catholic theology, the first inklings of ecumenism, but above all the consuming influence of the revival of the philosophy and theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, especially by Pope Leo XIII (the last pope of the 19th c. and the first of the 20th), and the peculiar form this revival took, called Neo-Thomism. Neo-Thomism was a stabilizing reaction against all the social and cultural upheavals in 19th c. Europe. Its main feature was Leo XIII's positing the philosophical-speculative theology of Thomas Aquinas as "the perennial philosophy" -- the unchanging, ever-relevant complete structure of truth and reality, applicapble in every situation. Neo-Thomism arose at almost exactly the same time as the movement in Catholic theology condemned by the Neo-Thomists as "Modernism." Modernism was the catch-all category for any signs of infiltration of liberal Protestantism or anti-church secularism into the enclosed world of the embattled Catholic Church. Pope Pius X proved to be the hammer of Catholic truth beating down every suspect of Modernism, entrenching Neo-Thomist scholasticism as the only way of thought in the Catholic Church.

    In between WW I and WW II, especially in France, a revival of the earlier 19th c. historical-critical approach to theology caused Pope Pius XI to suspect a resurgence of Modernism, which was labelled with the derrogatory danger-sign of "a new theology" -- Nouvelle Theologie. To scholastic Neo-Thomism, anything "new" in theology was ipso facto heretical and Modernist; the "perennial philosophy" neither needed nor tolerated anything "new." As with many originally derrogatory appelations, however (like "Christian"!), "nouvelle theologie" stuck as an identifier of a new sort of momentum of change in the Catholic Church and its theology -- even though the two major pillars of "nouvelle theologie", Henri de Lubac SJ and Yves Congar OP, denied any sort or intentional "movement" called "Nouvelle Theologie" and insisted that they certainly were not party to any such thing.

    This is all crucial to Mettepenningen's case, and the first chapter of the book presents this background clearly, succinctly, and notes the lines of connection to the theologians and the three historical periods of the Nouvelle Theologie momentum (he respects and agrees with de Lubac and Congar that there was no actual self-conscious connected organized reform movement under this heading) which he sees as the crucial historical trajectory of a general convrgence of vision for reform of the Catholic Church.

    Thus, in using "Nouvelle Theologie" as his designation and viewfinder, Mettepennigen eliminates any idea of a competition between a proto-aggiornamento and a proto-ressourcement development. He leaves behind general terms today loaded with ideological baggage, steps away from the idea of semi-organized intentional movements, and instead goes back to a very traditional way of historical study: biography and bibliography; who said what, when, and where did they write it?

    The other advantage to this biographical-bibliographical approach is that seven of the theologians he studied became official theological advisors at Vatican II. By not assigning a pre-conceived agenda, but looking at each one on his own, the author brings to light the unique contributions of each one to the Council.

    Structurally, after a general historical background introduction, the book divides the era of Nouvelle Theologie into three time periods which do overlap (history is never so neat and tidy) but are distinctive in leadership, orientation, and Vatican reaction. The first period is dominated by Dominican scholars, and tackles the questions of how to intepret and undrstand Thomas Aquinas. The move to the study of "the historical Aquinas" in his own historical context and the sources he used rejected the "perennial philosophy" approach of reigning Neo-Thomism. This first phase also saw the opening up of ecumenical interests and often-clandestine ecumenical conversations.

    The second period is the provenance of the Jesuits. Here the focus turned to scholarly and critical historical study of the Church Fathers as fundamental to Tradition and new-ancient methods of interpreting Scripture. The Patristic focus revealed a continuity into the early and high Middle Ages up to the 12th century and "the last of the Fathers," St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Distinctive also was the rehabilitation of Origen, the 3rd century theologian who dominated Patristic and Medieval theology in both East and West through his biblical exegesis, while being condemned for some of his speculative theology. The writings of Origen were collected, edited and published along with the "orthodox" Fathers. Historical research on the development of the Eucharist and the Mass, which had wide-ranging implications for ecclesiology -- ultimately shaping Vatican II's "Sacrosanctum Concillium," "Lumen Gentium" and "Gaudium et Spes" -- made great strides in this second period.

    The Vatican response to the "new theology" of both these periods was heavy-handed suppression. Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII were devoted Neo-Thomists and found themselves even more embattled in guarding and preserving the Church from the collapse of Europe going on all around them in communism, fascism, Nazism and atheism. The "fortress mentality" of the Catholic Church determined their thinking.

    Both the first two phases took place in France. The third phase was the "internationalization" (as Mettepennigen terms it) of Nouvelle Theologie. That is rather grandiose, as his focus is the skip out of France into Belgium and the Netherlands. Some readers may be surprised by the two theologians who represent this third phase, as they are usually considered Progressives and on the opposite side of most of the theologians considered in the first two phases: Edward Schillebeeckx and Piet Schoonenberg. Mettepennigen sees in them a continuing evolution of the momentum of Nouvelle Theologie, picking up elements from outside France (and in that sense, "internationalizing").

    The author is clear from the start that he confines his research to the theologians directly involved in controversy with the Vatican in France between 1935-1958. The third phase is more an extension, and the treatment of Vatican II an addendum. He also sees this book as the beginning of a much needed critical study of these theologians and of the history of Vatican II, a history which only now, at some 50 years' distance, can begin to be written.

  • This book looks quite interesting for the history of ideas, Catholic ones, in describing the ferment of ideas leading the Catholic Church's evolution that brought about Vatican II. But of course now there has been a revanchism and a re-entrenchment. Most of this is in the past. Now Dominicans are busy as apologists par excellence. On the Vox Nova site I interacted with one, Dominic Holtz, O.P. But as is typical of these sites, their commitment to dialogue is limited to not questioning the basic motives of ecclesiology these days for Catholics. In the interest of fairness here is my last post to Dominic Holtz of the Agelicum in Rome:

    "Peter Paul Fuchs PERMALINK
    May 18, 2011 2:24 pm
    Please Note: Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    Dominic the Dominican,
    Well, you have come up with another howler: "The claim of Catholic stultification of intellectual endeavor is simply not found in respectable, academic historical work."
    I think this shows, again with due respect to you, the willingness of Catholics these days, as quite distinct from the past, to just play fast and loose with historical facts. "Catholic stultification" was my attempt at euphemism, trying to be charitable, a lot of good it does me apparently. In fact the scholarly literature on Latin America is filled with much more than "stultification" laid at the doorstep of the Church. To such an extent that I really wonder if what you consider "respectable" is on the level of Thomas Woods' puerile emissions. I am afraid you prove my point exactly about the insular and, to my mind, solipsistic rationale alive today in Rome apparently. A great shame because many Catholic historians of the past were very honest. And let other casual readers note that I have avoided even talking about the Holy Office, manned mostly by your Order, out of respects for you, but boy there is a lot there vis-a-vis Latin America in the "respectable" literature.
    As to your specific point about the appointment of Bishops by the Crown, that is a good one. And it shows again how complicated history is at every period. We are not going to encompass centuries' long complexity in a few blog comments. But let us take as a guiding example the reform efforts of Archbishop Palafox, and the really amazing counter efforts by the Jesuits. The same Jesuits working directly at Papal behest, and not the Crown! I think if we are talking "paradigmatic" this case shows when push came to shove with the Crown the true power of the top leadership of the Church in Latin America, and its true intent.
    I am well aware of the trend of recent Church apologetics to try to fob off all criticism with assertions of some sub rosa intellectual compliance with "ant-Catholic" historiographical bias. That is such a huge topic that all I can bring myself to say is NO to that simplistic idea.
    Lastly, I take real offense at your idea of "blackmail". Partly because it implies something surreptitious which I make an effort never to be in dialogue. My assertions to you, to any fair reader, will seem the opposite. Namely, a simple blatant promise. An open promise. I promise you that those, like myself, who have been harmed, and continue to be harmed by the historic evil of the church's continuing campaign against gay people will do the opposite of what some retrograde elements in the Church expect, and secretly would like. Unlike those who will show up and annoy people in public, which I think is uncouth, I will employ intellectual matters to make the point. There is nothing surreptitious in it. The difference with my efforts, is that they are guided by a considerable personal and intellectual knowledge of the Church. In this light I see the also truly evil persecution of Christians in Egypt and other parts of the Middle East , as a side matter, as an indication of just how childish the attitude of many Christian, and specifically Catholics, is in this country. Instead of blessing the Republic and its ethos that allows great freedom here, so many are involved seemingly in a wink-wink, nod-nod effort to try to rewrite history and smuggle in Thomistic rationality as, mirabile dictu, the basis for polity in this country (Robert George is a good example of this bad tendency) . And the attitude towards gay rights shows this in a terrible way. So my entreaty would be the following, stop acting like spoiled children who do not appreciate what they already have."