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ePub The Psalter: A Faithful and Inclusive Rendering from the Hebrew into Contemporary English Poetry, Intended Primarily for Communal Song and Recitation download

by Gabe Huck

ePub The Psalter: A Faithful and Inclusive Rendering from the Hebrew into Contemporary English Poetry, Intended Primarily for Communal Song and Recitation download
Author:
Gabe Huck
ISBN13:
978-0929650883
ISBN:
0929650883
Language:
Publisher:
Liturgy Training Pubns (April 1, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Catholicism
ePub file:
1507 kb
Fb2 file:
1264 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
190

I understand that this inclusive rendering of the psalms is not for everyone: some will object to the avoidance of. .

Unlike the Coverdale and KJV versions, which managed to marry Hebrew and English in a truly 'dynamic' fashion, yet with something approaching word-for-word fidelity, subsequent attempts unhesitatingly abandon any attempt at poetic expression, substituting, instead, a dry technical description for something that was - once - alive.

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References to this work on external resources.

An entire psalter of one hundred fifty psalms in The Book of Common Prayer translation set to Anglican chant in the time-honored "speech rhythm" pointing of The Parish Psalter from England as refined by Ray Francis Brown during his thirty-year tenure as Director of Music at The General Theological Seminary in New York City. The Standing Commission on Church Music followed Brown's principles in pointing the psalms of this book. References to this work on external resources.

Customers who bought this item also bought. 1. The Psalter: A Faithful and Inclusive Rendering from the Hebrew into Contemporary English Poetry, In. Published by Liturgy Training Pubns (1995). ISBN 10: 0929650883 ISBN 13: 9780929650883.

March 5, 2015 Patrick T Reardon 0. Many of the books of the Bible are like Hollywood musicals. Another important goal was to render the canticles poetically in present-day colloquial English, avoiding words and sentence structures that may have been in use in Biblical times but not today. Beautiful and, for some, jarring.

This is a great translation of the prayer book of our Jewish brothers and sisters and our brother Jesus. I read from this translation of the Psalms each morning. The food from God for the work of God. Thank you. D Aaker. A very approachable Psalter. com User, August 17, 2000. This translation of the Psalms is by the ICEL (International Commission on Enlish in the Liturgy). Their goal is to provide a translation suitable for use in liturgy and personal prayer. This book takes that text and makes it "user friendly".

Epic poetry and Tragedy, Comedy also and Dithyrambic poetry, and the music of the flute . Song holds the chief place among the embellishments.

Epic poetry and Tragedy, Comedy also and Dithyrambic poetry, and the music of the flute and of the lyre in most of their forms, are all in their general conception modes of imitation. They differ, however, from one another in three respects-the medium, the objects, the manner or mode of imitation, being in each case distinct. The tragedies of most of our modern poets fail in the rendering of character; and of poets in general this is often true. It is the same in painting; and here lies the difference between Zeuxis and Polygnotus. Polygnotus delineates character well; the style of Zeuxis is devoid of ethical quality.

A faithful and inclusive rendering from the Hebrew into contemporary English
  • I understand that this inclusive rendering of the psalms is not for everyone: some will object to the avoidance of "he, him, his" in reference to God. Others will find the language too plain and contemporary. But I actually believe there is beauty and grace in this text, and by incorporating it into my daily prayer, I've found the psalms confronting me in surprising ways. The language is direct, but often powerful for that reason. Consider the difference between Psalm 96:1-6 in the New American Bible and the Liturgical Psalter's translation:

    NAB
    Sing to the Lord a new song;
    sing to the Lord, all the earth.
    Sing to the Lord, bless his name;
    proclaim his salvation day after day.
    Tell his glory among the nations;
    among all peoples, his marvelous deeds.

    For great is the Lord and highly to be praised,
    to be feared above all gods.
    For the gods of the nations are idols,
    but the Lord made the heavens.
    Splendor and power go before him;
    power and grandeur are in his holy place.

    Liturgical Psalter
    A new song for the Lord!
    Sing it and bless God's name,
    everyone, everywhere!
    Tell the whole world
    God's triumph day to day,
    God's glory, God's wonder.

    A noble God deserving praise,
    the dread of other gods,
    the puny gods of pagans;
    for our God made the heavens--
    the Lord of majestic light
    who fills the temple with beauty.

    Personally, I found the Liturgical Psalter's version a more powerful rendering, and there's a sense of divine anger in "the puny gods of pagans" that doesn't quite come across with "idols." (Think of how the word "idol" has lost its force in contemporary usage, as in "American Idol." But there's no way of sanitizing the meaning of "puny gods.") In any case, I understand why the U.S. bishops (bowing to pressure from the Vatican) had to withdraw the imprimatur from this translation in 2000. But it's still regrettable that this psalter -- or a complete Daily Office based on it -- is not in print.

  • The withdrawal of the imprimatur, by the CDF, of this Psalter has meant the loss of a vibrant and evocative translation: one which is in a class of its own. Unlike the Coverdale and KJV versions, which managed to marry Hebrew and [16c-17c] English in a truly 'dynamic' fashion, yet with something approaching word-for-word fidelity, subsequent attempts unhesitatingly abandon any attempt at poetic expression, substituting, instead, a dry technical description for something that was - once - alive. The world is now filled with tepid, desiccated, and timorous prose-renderings of what was - once - "the" Prayer Book, not just of the Second Temple, but of Our Lord. Please, Cardinal Müller: let the LTP Psalter go free! Or donate the copyright to someone else ...

  • This is my favorite wedding present. My husband and I have been reading a psalm to each other every night for almost 25 years. We've gone through a lot of translations in this way, and this book meets our three criteria: (1) a lyrical translation (2) a text which fits on the narrow headboard of the bed and be lifted easily with one hand while lying in bed (3) a physical text which honors these ancient words of God. (The Abbey Psalter, for example, meets criteria (1) and (3) but not (2).) I don't mean to be flippant; this is not only a physically beautiful book, but one suited to daily use. A rare and wonderful gift.

  • An excellent modern version of the famous book of Jewish poetry. After having studied the Psalms as part of my theology degree I can appreciate the effort the author invested to get it versed in modern and almost all inclusive language. This version keeps the depth of meaning that may be lost in other modern versions. I highly recommend it for those who are serious about studying the Psalms.

  • This translation of the Psalms is fabulous. It renders the psalms in clear, crisp language, and above all in inclusive language. I feel like I'm in possession of something very precious, the work of a group of scholars, poets, and musicians. The songs and deep-felt emotions are now available for us to enjoy in our own, modern language.

  • Translation controversies aside, this is one of the most beautiful versions, of the very many, that I have used to pray with. Love it!

  • Product excellent; service, more than could be expected.

  • Perfect condition.