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ePub Catholic Theology (Doing Theology) download

by Tracey Rowland

ePub Catholic Theology (Doing Theology) download
Author:
Tracey Rowland
ISBN13:
978-0567034380
ISBN:
0567034380
Language:
Publisher:
T&T Clark (January 26, 2017)
Category:
Subcategory:
Catholicism
ePub file:
1506 kb
Fb2 file:
1920 kb
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
436

Rowland showcases here the dominant contemporary approaches to doing Catholic theology

Rowland showcases here the dominant contemporary approaches to doing Catholic theology. Chapter 1 offers a summary of the two International Theological Commission (ITC) documents on the discipline of Catholic theology. These documents set out the general principles which should govern any approach to Catholic theology (at least according to the ITC). The subsequent chapters each focus on one of four different approaches frequently found in contemporary Catholic academies: the approach of Thomists.

Catholic Theology book. The subsequent Rowland showcases here the dominant contemporary approaches to doing Catholic theology.

Tracey Rowland holds the St John Paul II Chair of Theology at the University of Notre Dame, Australia and is a member of the International Theological Commission. Write your question below

Rowland showcases here the dominant contemporary approaches to doing Catholic theology

Rowland showcases here the dominant contemporary approaches to doing Catholic theology  .

The word Theology is used to refer to any informed discussion about God or religion. The are many types of Catholic Theology including Biblical Theology, John Paul II’s Theology of the Body, Moral Theology, Dogmatic Theology, and Historical Theology. Some of the most well known Catholic Theologians include Thomas Aquinas, Augustine of Hippo, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Bernard of Clairvaux, Catherine of Siena, Francis de Sales, Teresa of Ávila, Romano Guardini, Alice von Hildebrand, Dietrich von Hildebrand, and even Pope Benedict XVI.

Theologian, professor, and author Tracey Rowland holds two doctorates in theology, one from the Divinity School of Cambridge University (the civil PhD) and one from the John Paul II Institute at the Pontifical Lateran University (the pontifical STD) in addition to degrees in law and philosophy. After studies at the University of Queensland, she lectured in Soviet and Central European Politics at Monash University while completing a Masters degree in contemporary Central European political theory.

Now, in this probing book, Tracey Rowland offers a third reading, one that situates the thought of Pope Benedict within the intellectual history and academic circles of his time. The volume also includes a bibliography arranged thematically for those who want to explore his thought more deeply in a particular area. Скачать (pdf, . 7 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Rowland showcases here the dominant contemporary approaches to doing Catholic theology. Chapter 1 offers a summary of the two International Theological Commission (ITC) documents on the discipline of Catholic theology. These documents set out the general principles which should govern any approach to Catholic theology (at least according to the ITC). The subsequent chapters each focus on one of four different approaches frequently found in contemporary Catholic academies: the approach of Thomists, members of the Communio milieu, members of the Concilium milieu and promoters of different varieties of Liberation Theology. Rowland's work is pitched at the level of first time students of theology who are trying to make sense of the methodological choices which undergird the different approaches to Catholic theology.Rowland concludes with four appendices: a list of all Doctors of the Church, a list of all encyclicals since the 19th century, a list of the documents of the Second Vatican Council, and a list of definitions of the various Christological heresies which were the subject of the debates of the early Church Councils. These appendices will provide useful reference tables for young scholars, including seminarians.

  • This is an excellent book. It is helpful for people trying to understand the conflicting views of current theologians and clergy. It is well-organized and non-theologians will find it relatively easy to understand. I am grateful that Tracey Rowland wrote this book at this time.

  • Tracey Rowland, like Tom Weinandy, is a member of the International Theological Commission and was actually
    named by Pope Francis in 2014 I believe. This book is the first general reflection on Catholic systematic
    theology that I have seen that takes into account Pope Francis, who obviously is not a systematic theologian.
    The book has a discussion of Thomism, which was long the dominant philosophical and theological force
    in Catholic thought, and in the late 19th and early 20th century took the form known as "neo-Scholasticism".
    As Fergus Kerr noted in "Twentieth Century Catholic Theologians", almost every major Catholic theologian
    at the time of Vatican II was reacting against neo-Scholasticism. Rusty Reno in reviewing that book tried
    to show some of the benefits of Thomism, and Aidan Nichols in "Reason With Piety" showed the positive
    aspects of studying Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, a key figure in early to mid 20th century neo-Scholastic
    thought. Garrigou was in conflict with "la nouvelle theologie", the neo theology centered around figures
    like Henri de Lubac and Yves Congar. Rowland then traces the two divergent strands after Vatican II,
    which both rose up in reaction to neo-Scholasticism. These were the "communio" of Henri de Lubac,
    Hans Urs von Balthasar and Joseph Ratzinger, and the "concilium", which wanted to keep Vatican II's
    atmosphere of change going indefinitely and was led by Karl Rahner, Edward Schillebeeckx and Hans
    Kung (even though Rahner and Kung themselves disagreed on a lot). The communio crowd was devoted
    to "resourcement", going back to the sources of the early Church Fathers like Augustine and Origen, while
    the concilium was more prioritizing the "aggiornamento", the updating that John XXIII called for. Toward
    the end of the book, Tracey Rowland discusses liberation theology. Pope Francis, like John Paul II, was
    seen as being against liberation theology. This is only partially true, as he obviously uses a lot of liberation-
    sounding rhetoric. He was against Marxist liberation theology, but he favored the "theology of the people",
    which was a Peronist and populist version of liberation theology. This is essential to understanding the
    Bergoglio pontificate. Rowland's criticism isn't quite as direct as Fr. Weinandy's letter to Pope Francis,
    but it's remarkable that both remain on the theological commission.

  • For those who want a GPS for navigating the fissures and fault lines of post-conciliar Catholic theology, this book is it. But it is more. Tracey Rowland thinks with the mind of the Church. This is essential reading, especially for aspiring young theologians preparing to take up the noblest intellectual and spiritual adventure of all.

  • An excellent introduction to the main theological schools within Catholicism.

  • Excellent overview of the different currents in today's Roman Catholic theology by an Australian theology professor. It's very well documented, witty and enjoyable.

  • Wonderful book, rich in historical context.

  • I'm not a theology student, or even a Christian, but I was looking for something that would help explain why different accounts of Catholic thinkers like Aquinas and Duns Scotus seemed so widely divergent. Rowland's book really helped clarify what the differences are, and why they are significant.

    The explanation of the central issues of theology was helpful, and the account of the different versions of Thomism really cleared up some confusion for me (some "Thomist" thinkers had seemed to me to be practically Calvinist, and I couldn't make sense of this). For me, the most interesting part of the book was the discussion of the difference between the Coommunio and Concilium approaches to 20th century Catholic theology.

    I will say that certain things about the book made me a bit wary. Rowland's fears of, and gross misunderstanding of, Marxism, for one. She suggests that in the 20th century about half of all college professors were marxists. As an American, who has studied at or worked at nine universities over thirty years, this seems and odd statement to me. I've been at institutions from community colleges to the Ivy League, and among the several hundred college professors I've known, I've met only three marxists. But then, Rowland isn't in America--maybe the situation is different in Europe or Australia? Or perhpas this fear of marxists just has something to do with the current Pope?

    The bigger concern is that Rowland too often explains a theological position in the words of its opponents. This sometimes leaves me doubtful about whether she is presenting it fairly, and since I'm not a theologian myself, I can't really say.

    Overall, though, I found the book extremely helpful, not more difficult to follow than its enormous subject requires, and full of useful suggestion for where to go for further reading. As I said, I'm not a theology student, but an outsider curious about Catholic thought, so I can't say how useful this would be for someone more knowledgeable than I am. For me, it clarified a number of matters, and inspired me to look into some questions in further depth.