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ePub The Risk of Love download

by W. H. Vanstone

ePub The Risk of Love download
Author:
W. H. Vanstone
ISBN13:
978-0195200539
ISBN:
0195200535
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Book Club Edition edition (May 11, 1978)
Category:
Subcategory:
Christian Living
ePub file:
1535 kb
Fb2 file:
1583 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt rtf lit
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
390

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Theological truth is the truth of God's relationship with man and it is the fruit not of learning but of experience

Self-Limiting God of Love in Relationship with Us. By Thriftbooks. com User, August 31, 2004. In his struggles to understand the role of the church and what God requires, the author looks to a robust notion of love, including understanding the nature of God in a way that is amenable to the structure of love. The work in the initial segments is largely autobiographical as the author identifies his own journey to the theology of love that he eventually proposes.

Love's Endeavour, Love's Expense.

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Vanstone gives us an analysis of human love and leads us thereby to an apprehension of God's love. publishing name of Love's Endeavour was 'The Risk of Love'. I first encountered this book in the early 80's. I lent it out repeatedly until one day it never came back.

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James W. VanStone (October 3, 1925 – February 28, 2001) was an American cultural anthropologist specializing in the Inuit, Inupiat, and Yup'ik Eskimos

James W. VanStone (October 3, 1925 – February 28, 2001) was an American cultural anthropologist specializing in the Inuit, Inupiat, and Yup'ik Eskimos. He studied at the University of Pennsylvania and was a student of Frank Speck and A. Irving Hallowell. One of his first positions was at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois. In 1951, following completion of graduate studies, he joined the faculty of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.

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"Theological truth is the truth of God's relationship with man and it is the fruit not of learning but of experience. In this sense all theology, properly so called, is written in blood. It is an attempt to communicate what has been discovered at great cost in the deepest places of the heart -- by sorrow and joy, frustration and fulfilment, defeat and victory, agony and ecstasy, tragedy and triumph. Theology, properly so called, is the record of a man's wrestling with God. Wounded in some way or other by the struggle the man will certainly be, but in the end he will obtain the blessing promised to those who endure.....Foreword by H. A. Williams"
  • .

    this is by far one of the best books ever written about love,
    and ironically, and perhaps even revealingly, here it remains unnoticed, unrecognized.

    here's a paraphrased precis from the introduction:

    theological truth is the truth of god's relationship with all of humanity,
    and it is the fruit NOT of learning BUT of experience.
    in this sense ALL theology is written in blood.

    it is our attempt to communicate what has been discovered
    at a GREAT cost in the deepest places of our heart--
    by sorrow and joy,
    by frustration and fulfillment,
    by defeat and victory,
    by agony and ecstasy,
    by tragedy and triumph.

    ....

    and the RISK in the title applies to the greatest degree to god-self:

    "The activity of God in creation must be precarious.
    It must proceed by no assured programme.

    "Its progress, like every progress of love, must be an angular progress--
    in which each step is a precarious step into the unknown;
    in which each triumph contains a new potential of tragedy,
    and each tragedy may be redeemed into a wider triumph."

    ...

    no other book i've read on this THE most elusive of themes
    expresses best the MAJESTY that is LOVE!

    .

  • In his struggles to understand the role of the church and what God requires, the author looks to a robust notion of love, including understanding the nature of God in a way that is amenable to the structure of love. The work in the initial segments is largely autobiographical as the author identifies his own journey to the theology of love that he eventually proposes.

    In attempting to understand the purpose of the church, Vanstone wrestles with what it might mean for the church to glorify God. He comes to believe that God can be glorified only if God is truly interested in the work of the church. It is the importance of the church's work and his awareness of material reality that leads Vanstone to suppose that the whole of creation is a work of love.

    After rejecting the idea that divine love is wholly dissimilar to creaturely love, the author argues that we must extrapolate from the authentic love that we see around us in the creaturely world. In his analysis of the phenomenology of love, Vanstone discovers three signs of authentic love. The first is that authentic love has no limitation, in the sense that it does not choose to love some people and hate others. This does not mean that love is not constrained by circumstances, however. The authenticity of unlimited love involves the totality of giving of oneself to the other. The second mark of authentic love is the giving up of control. Love becomes distorted when it attempts to possess or manipulate the other. This means that love is risky, for it cannot control the other and often fails in its attempt to benefit the other. The third mark of authentic love is that the other affects it. The love gives to the object a certain power over the one loving. The one loved affects the one loving. This means that lovers are vulnerable.

    Upon examining a phenomenology of creaturely love, Vanstone turns to address divine love. He attributes to God a love that is limitless, vulnerable, and precarious. He appeals to the idea of kenosis, in the sense that God is self-giving in expression of love for creatures. The activity of God's love in creation is precarious, by which Vanstone means that it must not "proceed by an assured programme" (62).

    The precariousness of divine love is especially evident in the fact that evil exists. The fact that evil occurs implies that there is an other that is not divine; it does not imply that evil is willed by the creator. Vanstone argues that the God who foreordains and predetermines cannot be a God who loves. "If the creation is the work of love, its `security' lies not in its conformity to some predetermined plan, but in the unsparing love that will not abandon a single fragment of it, and man's assurance must be the assurance not that all that happens is determined by God's plan, but that all that happens is encompassed by His love" (66). When addressing the vulnerability of divine love, Vanstone contends that divine loving activity can result in either triumph or tragedy. Which of these two it will be is determined in part by creaturely response. This implies that God has need. For divine love to become complete, it must wait upon the understanding of those who receive it. This means that the creativity of God is dependent upon the responsive creativity of the creatures.

    Trinitarian theology fulfills the requirement that God needs another. "Trinitarian theology asserts that God's love for His creation is not the love that is borne of `emptiness' . . . it is the love which overflows from fullness" (69). "Of such a nature is the `kenosis' of God is the self-emptying of Him Who is already in every way fulfilled" (69). It is God who awaits a response from creation, a response that issues in either triumph or tragedy. "Tentatively, but with growing assurance, theology may interpret the dynamic of nature as the activity of love" (85).

    The proper human response to God amounts to the celebration of God's love, and that by which the love of God is celebrated may be called "the church." The church is wider than any recognized ecclesiastical structure, however, it includes the simplest action done out of awareness of God's love. The church, says Vanstone, is "the sum of all the structures and forms within which man expressed the recognition of the love of God" (97). In the visible church, humans aspire to create something that expresses their recognition of God's love. The church exists as the point in which the love of God is most profoundly exposed as the possibility for tragedy or triumph.

    Thomas Jay Oord

  • This is a great book, but note: "The Risk of Love" is exactly the same book as "Love's Endeavour, Love's Expense," except that "The Risk of Love" Is a hardback and is published by Oxford University Press. "Love's Endeavour, Love's Expense" is a paperback, published by Darton-Longman and Todd.