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ePub A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: How I Learned to Live a Better Story download

by Donald Miller

ePub A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: How I Learned to Live a Better Story download
Author:
Donald Miller
ISBN13:
978-1400202980
ISBN:
1400202981
Language:
Publisher:
Thomas Nelson; 1 edition (March 7, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Christian Living
ePub file:
1249 kb
Fb2 file:
1780 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf azw doc
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
848

After writing a successful book, author Donald Miller's life stalled.

After writing a successful book, author Donald Miller's life stalled. Instead of enjoying the fruits of his labor, Miller had slipped into a dark point in his life.

The underlying message is that we all have the God-given power to live a better story

He's the CEO of StoryBrand, the cohost of the Building a StoryBrand Podcast, and the author of several books, including the bestsellers Blue Like Jazz and A Million Miles in a Thousand Years. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee, with his wife, Betsy, and their dogs, Lucy and June Carter. The underlying message is that we all have the God-given power to live a better story. Miller is an ordinary guy who does extraordinary things and writes about them with humility, honesty, and humor.

Years after writing his best-selling memoir, Donald Miller went into a funk and spent months sleeping in and avoiding .

Years after writing his best-selling memoir, Donald Miller went into a funk and spent months sleeping in and avoiding his publisher. One story had ended, and Don was unsure how to start another. Years after writing his best-selling memoir, Donald Miller went into a funk and spent months sleeping in and avoiding his publisher. One story had ended, and Don was unsure how to start another

Years after writing a best-selling memoir, Donald Miller went into a funk and spent months sleeping in and avoiding his publisher.

Years after writing a best-selling memoir, Donald Miller went into a funk and spent months sleeping in and avoiding his publisher. But he gets rescued by two movie producers who want to make a movie based on his memoir

Miles In A Thousand Years: How I Learned To Live A Better Story. I cannot get enough Don Miller

A Million Miles In A Thousand Years: How I Learned To Live A Better Story. What kind of life do you want? How do you want to be remembered? What is worthy of being remembered anyway? I don’t want to come across as an overzealous fan, but let me just say this. I cannot get enough Don Miller. I have not read a book of his that I did not immensely enjoy. Miller is an absolutely fabulous writer. Whatever your circumstance, you will want to live a better life story

34 people like this topic.

34 people like this topic.

Part I: Exposition - Random scenes - It's improv - A million miles in a thousand years - It's all about the story - Your real life is boring - Flesh and soul better - My uncle's funeral and a wedding - Going to see the guru . .

Part I: Exposition - Random scenes - It's improv - A million miles in a thousand years - It's all about the story - Your real life is boring - Flesh and soul better - My uncle's funeral and a wedding - Going to see the guru - The basic elements. Of a meaningful life - How Jason saved his family - Part II: A character - Writing the world - Imperfect is perfect - The point of life is transformation - Story application in leadership - A character is what he does - A character must save the cat - A good character listens.

This book was recommended to me by a friend, so I gave it a shot - I wouldn't have otherwise. I'm not the most religious person out there, and the book definitely has a bit of that flavoring

This book was recommended to me by a friend, so I gave it a shot - I wouldn't have otherwise. I'm not the most religious person out there, and the book definitely has a bit of that flavoring. sucked so he starts living a better story

Donald Miller believes that story is a powerful tool that can help to shape our lives.

Donald Miller believes that story is a powerful tool that can help to shape our lives. A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: How I Learned to Live a Better Story.

How brightly a better story shines. How easily the world looks to it in wonder It’s as though God is saying, Write a good story, take somebody withyou, andlet me help. How easily the world looks to it in wonder. How grateful we are to hear these stories, and how happy it makes us to repeat them. We had to learn ourselves and, furthermore, we had to teach the despairing men, that it did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. Like. It’s as though God is saying, Write a good story, take somebody withyou, andlet me help.

After writing a successful memoir, Donald Miller's life stalled. During what should have been the height of his success, he found himself unwilling to get out of bed, avoiding responsibility, even questioning the meaning of life. But when two movie producers proposed turning his memoir into a movie, he found himself launched into a new story filled with risk, possibility, beauty, and meaning.

A Million Miles in a Thousand Years chronicles Miller's rare opportunity to edit his life into a great story, to reinvent himself so nobody shrugs their shoulders when the credits roll. Through heart-wrenching honesty and hilarious self-inspection, Donald Miller takes readers through the life that emerges when it turns from boring reality into meaningful narrative.

Miller goes from sleeping all day to riding his bike across America, from living in romantic daydreams to fearful encounters with love, from wasting his money to founding a nonprofit with a passionate cause. Guided by a host of outlandish but very real characters, Miller shows us how to get a second chance at life the first time around. A Million Miles in a Thousand Years is a rare celebration of the beauty of life.

  • Great book that illustrates the concept of narrative therapy without mentioning "narrative therapy." It starts kinda slow, but golden nuggets of wisdom pours out eventually. Among my favorite quotes, either because they're insightful or because I can relate to them:

    "No girl who plays the role of a hero dates a guy who uses her."

    "But the want wasn't enough. The desire to live a better story didn't motivate me to do anything."

    "People love to have lived a great story, but few people like the work it takes to make it happen."

    "A general rule in creating stories is that characters don't want to change. They must be forced to change. Nobody wakes up and starts chasing a bad guy or dismantling a bomb unless something forces them to do so."

    "Humans are designed to seek comfort and order, and so if they have comfort and order, they tend to plant themselves, even if their comfort isn't all that comfortable. And even if they secretly want for something better."

    "They have to get fired from their job or be forced to sign up for a marathon. A ring has to be purchased. A home has to be sold. The character has to jump into the story, into the discomfort and the fear, otherwise the story will never happen."

    "James Scott Bell says an inciting incident is a doorway through which the protagonist cannot return."

    "...progress, no matter how slow, is all that matters."

    "It's true that while ambition creates fear, it also creates the story. But it's a good trade, because as soon as you point toward a horizon, life no longer feels meaningless. And suddenly there is risk in your story and a question about whether you'll make it."

    Regarding Star Wars: "...if I paused the DVD on any frame, I could point toward any major character and say exactly what that person wanted. No character had a vague ambition. It made me wonder if the reasons our lives seem so muddled is because we keep walking into scenes in which we, along with the people around us, have no clear idea what we want."

    "Once an ambition has been decided, a positive turn is an event that moves the protagonist closer to the ambition, and a negative turn moves the protagonist away from his ambition. All stories have both. If a story doesn't have negative turns, it's not an interesting story. A protagonist who understands this idea lives a better story. He doesn't give up when he encounters a setback, because he knows that every story has both positive and negative turns."

    "Neither (a husband and wife) needed the other to make everything okay. They were simply content to have good company through life's conflicts."

    "...when I began thinking about story as a guide for life, I took a lot of comfort in that principle. It wasn't necessary to win for the story to be great, it was only necessary to sacrifice everything."

    "A good movie has memorable scenes, and so does a good life."

  • Life changing! Really. Truly.

    Donald Miller decides to edit his life (as you would edit your character's life in a book) and the life he used to lead was just a normal life, a life, I am sure most of us can relate to.

    He starts with an instant hook:
    "IF YOU WATCHED a movie about a guy who wanted a Volvo and worked for years to get it, you wouldn't cry at the end when he drove off the lot, testing the windshield wipers. You wouldn't tell your friends you saw a beautiful movie or go home and put a record on to think about the story you'd seen. The truth is, you wouldn't remember that movie a week later, except you'd feel robbed and want your money back. Nobody cries at the end of a movie about a guy who wants a Volvo. But we spend years actually living those stories, and expect our lives to feel meaningful. The truth is, if what we choose to do with our lives won't make a story meaningful, it won't make a life meaningful either."

    Who wouldn't want to read further? Isn't this, unfortunatelly, what most people strive towards, obtaining something...material? (whether they admit to it or not)

    "In a pure story, there is a purpose in every scene, in every line of dialogue. A movie is going somewhere." - and this gets Donald thinking...where is his life going, where is he, as a character in it, really going?

    "A character who wants something and overcomes conflict to get it is the basic structure of a good story." - true...yet, Donald muses, we go through our life trying to avoid conflict, tryng to have it too easy and our lives become meaningless, i.e. we do not live good stories.

    And

    "But I also wondered if he wasn't right, that we were designed to live through something rather than to attain something, and the thing we were meant to live through was designed to change us. The point of a story is the character arc, the change."

    And

    "But I've noticed something. I've never walked out of a meaningless movie thinking all movies are meaningless. I only thought the movie I walked out on was meaningless. I wonder, then, if when people say life is meaningless, what they really mean is their lives are meaningless. I wonder if they've chosen to believe their whole existence is unremarkable, and are projecting their dreary life on the rest of us."

    This book is full of amazing wisdoms like this and it is entertaining, biographical as well as very philosophical.

    It easily made my "favorites" shelf.

  • In this book, the author is approached by a pair of independent filmmakers who want to make his first book (which had been a NYT bestseller for 43 weeks) into a movie. Unsure how a collection of essays would work as a movie, Miller nevertheless agrees and now faces the task of editing his past life into a story with a plot. In the process, he embarks upon a fascinating exploration of “story” as a metaphor for life — the one he is now living. In a later edition the subtitle was revised to: How I Learned to Live a Better Story. The underlying message is that we all have the God-given power to live a better story. Miller is an ordinary guy who does extraordinary things and writes about them with humility, honesty, and humor. He made me laugh and cry and buy five more copies of this book to give as gifts.