mostraligabue
» » The Soul of Prayer

ePub The Soul of Prayer download

by Eugene H. Peterson,P. Forsyth,P.T. Forsyth

ePub The Soul of Prayer download
Author:
Eugene H. Peterson,P. Forsyth,P.T. Forsyth
ISBN13:
978-1573830409
ISBN:
1573830402
Language:
Publisher:
Regent College Publishing (January 1, 1916)
Category:
Subcategory:
Theology
ePub file:
1503 kb
Fb2 file:
1149 kb
Other formats:
docx azw lrf txt
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
691

Eugene H. Peterson P. T. Forsyth is sometimes described as an English pre-cursor to Karl Barth. The Soul of Prayer provides a concise overview of New Testament prayer (in 95 pages) from the perspective of Scottish clergyman Dr. .

Eugene H. He was born in 1848 to a Scottish family of humble origins and later in life attended Aberdeen University. The author penned this work while Great Britain (including its Christian population) languished under the dark clouds of the Great War (.

The worst sin is prayerlessness, states . Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически. Over his lifetime Forsyth published 25 books and more than 260 articles. He was born in 1848 to a Scottish family of humble origins and later in life attended Aberdeen University, where he graduated with first-class honours in classical literature in 1869. In 1876 he was ordained and called to minister in Shipley, Yorkshire.

Peter Taylor Forsyth, also known as P. Forsyth, (1848–1921) was a Scottish theologian. The son of a postman, Forsyth studied at the University of Aberdeen and then in Göttingen (under Albrecht Ritschl). He was ordained into the Congregational ministry and served churches as pastor at Bradford, Manchester, Leicester and Cambridge, before becoming Principal of Hackney College, London (later subsumed into the University of London) in 1901.

Title: The Soul of Prayer By: . Eugene H. Forsyth Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 112 Vendor: Regent College Publishing Publication Date: 1916. Dimensions: . 0 X . 8 X . 9 (inches) Weight: 5 ounces ISBN: 1573830402 ISBN-13: 9781573830409 Stock No: WW830409. Publisher's Description.

LibriVox recording of The Soul of Prayer by P. Forsyth. Read in English by Paul Mazumdar The worst sin is prayerlessness, states .

In Forsyth's company we are aware of both the glory and the gravity of what we are doing when we go to our knees in prayer.

Here is a no-nonsense theologian who goes for the jugular  . In Forsyth's company we are aware of both the glory and the gravity of what we are doing when we go to our knees in prayer. Peterson, author of The Message Bible, says of Forsyth’s, The Soul of Prayer: Here is a no-nonsense theologian who goes for the jugular. So much literature on prayer comes off as fluffy and ethereal, however, Forsyth's "Soul of Prayer" is food for our minds. To really grow in our prayer we must think hard about what prayer is and what happens as a result in our own hearts.

"Here is a no-nonsense theologian who goes for the jugular. In Forsyth's company we are aware of both the glory and the gravity of what we are doing when we go to our knees in prayer." -Eugene H. Peterson P. T. Forsyth is sometimes described as an English pre-cursor to Karl Barth. He was born in 1848 to a Scottish family of humble origins and later in life attended Aberdeen University, where he graduated with first-class honours in classical literature in 1869. In 1876 he was ordained and called to minister in Shipley, Yorkshire. In his early ministry in the Congregational Church, Forsyth fought orthodoxy and sought for the right to rethink Christian theology and pursue liberal thought. In 1878, however, Forsyth experienced a conversion from, in his own words, "being a Christian to being a believer, from a lover of love to an object of grace." A profound awareness of pastoral responsibility was awakened which radically altered the the course of his ministry. His conversion thrust him from the leadership of liberalism to a recovery of the theology of grace. Quickly, he became one of the better-known figures in British Nonconformity. In 1894, he received a call to Emmanuel College in Cambridge, where he preached his famous sermon, "Holy Father" in 1896. In 1901, he accepted a position as principal of Hackney Theological College, London where he remained until he died in 1921. Over his lifetime Forsyth published 25 books and more than 260 articles. He is often credited with recovering for his generation the reality and true dimensions of the grace of God.
  • The Soul of Prayer provides a concise overview of New Testament prayer (in 95 pages) from the perspective of Scottish clergyman Dr. P.T. Forsyth.
    The author penned this work while Great Britain (including its Christian population) languished under the dark clouds of the Great War (i.e. World War 1). This partly accounts for the serious tone of the work. The seven chapters expound philosophical and scriptural principles relating to the prayer life of the believer; the chapter headings are thus: The Inwardness of Prayer, The Naturalness of Prayer, The Moral Reactions of Prayer, The Timeliness of Prayer, The Ceaselessness of Prayer, The Vicariousness of Prayer and The Insistency of Prayer. This book is not an easy read - as a matter of fact, the first five chapters are encumbered with flowery language and a cumbersome sentence structure. The Christian layperson (for whom the work is intended) could be unduly challenged by this writing style. However, for those who faithfully review The Soul of Prayer, many spiritual gems can be unearthed. The final two chapters (which were added from another of the author's works) provide the high point of the work. Dr. Forsyth's thoughts on the pastoral calling to prayer - as well as the need for insistence (i.e. importunity) in prayer are worth the cost of the book. Of such are his statements, "... it is prayer with concentration, it has not only thought, but will in it" and, "Let him pray now that never prayed before, and him that prayed before but pray the more". I must say that Dr. Forsyth's treatise is not a manual on prayer (a common pattern found in many contemporary books on prayer), but provides a rationale for a true "seeker after righteousness" to cultivate a fruitful prayer life. For this reason, I can recommend this book as a valuable tool to individuals occupying pulpit or pew. The serious believer would be well advised to follow Dr.
    Forsyth's example in seeking the God Who births and consummates effectual prayer.

  • This is by far my most favorite book on prayer, and I have referred to it over and over again since I first read it in 1988. Forsyth provides endless revelations about the dynamics of prayer, not so much for the answers prayer brings, but for the profoundly satisfying experience of a prayerful life. Forsyth states that prayer is the atmosphere of revelation and then goes on to demonstrate that fact in every sentence of the book, each one the potential object of prolonged meditation. He also reveals the prophetic nature of prayer in that we are merely returning to God what he placed in our hearts to begin with, and Forsyth unpacks the mysteries of this process in a variety of ways. If this book does not whet your appetite to pray, no other book will. I can't recommend this book enough for those who want to grow deep with the Creator of the universe.

  • The book puts in perspective the practical and powerful purpose of prayer afforded to every true believer in Christ Jesus. Forsyth shared some points about prayer that actually inspire one to pray while understanding prayer is essential to a close walk with God. For example, prayer is a gift from God to each believer. Prayer has multiple dimensions of blessing to the one who prays and building their relationship with God. A Spirit directed prayer will be one given by the Holy Spirit and returned unto the God the Father - thus the Spirit giving us utterance and showing us God's will. There can be no closer relationship with God.

    Some portions of the book are perhaps deeper in consideration than some are looking for. Neverthess, the spiritual nuggets of truth, power and purpose of prayer is worth a serious contemplative read. Highly recommended.

  • P. T. Forsyth takes a unique slant on the soul of prayer. I own this volume, andd it owns me; and I've bought it for others too. Forsyth believes strongly in praying for God's will to be done--no question about it. However, he points out with biblical examples that many of us back into prayer instead of battling into prayer with heart and soul. God answers prayers that mean something to us; and they must mean something to us if they're to mean anything to God. He shows us that God has some blessings for us we won't get unless we ask for them. He shows us that God honors persistent prayer like that of the importunate widow or Jacob or others. I recommend it without reservation.

  • First four chapters were kind of flowery and "spiritual" sounding, too abstract where I couldn't pin down what the author was getting at, at least, that's how I took it. Felt like I was reading the same ol' same ol' on prayer...nothing new.

    Then chapter 5 seemed to change tone, more practical and insightful, and by the time I got through the last two chapters (6 and 7), he had stated very meaningful and deep things about prayer in a way that I have never read about prayer in any other book. For example, in the last chapter, the author states that insistent prayer is a form of resistence to God's will, "a resistance that God loves". He further suggests, "Prayer is an encounter of wills - till one or the other gives way."

    The last chapter makes reading the whole book, which is really short, worth it. I'm glad I didn't put it down as I was tempted to do while reading the earlier chapters.

  • The first chapters of this book are a little difficult - not an unusual aspect of Forsyth's work. Some will find them a little too abstract, without enough 'how-to'. Forsyth isn't much given to 'how-to', I suspect. Nevertheless, Forsyth writes strongly on his subject, and always has some wise things to say.
    The book improves greatly as it goes on - it was originally two different works brought together, I think. Keep reading. The last couple of chapters were, for me, the best.

  • Loved this book! It was such an encouragement to pray and believe that we receive answers!

  • A good book but hard to understand. I think it's due to the time in which it was written because the speech and grammar they used back then are different than what we use.