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ePub Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty download

by Paul M. Anderson

ePub Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty download
Author:
Paul M. Anderson
ISBN13:
978-0830815999
ISBN:
0830815996
Language:
Publisher:
IVP Books; PRINT-ON-DEMAND edition (January 2, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Theology
ePub file:
1449 kb
Fb2 file:
1696 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
556

Paul M. Anderson (P. Another says, "I sometimes marvel at the freedom that I have experienced as a Christian faculty member in a secular university.

Paul M. University of Minnesota) is professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biology in the School of Medicine at the University of Minnesota, Duluth. Part of that freedom stems from the value that the university places on diversity. It tolerates all beliefs and practices, including Christian ones.

Professors Who Believe book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Often the university is seen as a hothouse of anti-Christian. Start by marking Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Professors Who Believe. The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty. Here are the stories of twenty-two such Christian faculty, who tell in their own words the difference that Christ has made in their lives and their work. College & University. Respected and accomplished in a variety of academic disciplines, these believers have come to a strong understanding of their faith within their professions. They have wrestled with the issues of a complex world and found meaning and purpose through their spiritual journeys. These very personal stories offer thoughtful models of how faith can not only survive but thrive in the university world.

You're here Christian Books Index Books Church History Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of. .Here are the stories of twenty-two such Christian faculty, who tell in their own words the difference that Christ has made in their lives and their work

You're here Christian Books Index Books Church History Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty.

Anderson, Paul . ed. Professors Who Believe: The Spiritual Journeys of Christian Faculty. An encyclical issued by John Paul II concerning the nature and identity of Catholic institutions of higher learning. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1998. - A collection of essays by professors at either public or private, non-sectarian colleges and universities concerning how they see religious faith influencing their work in their chosen academic disciplines. Averill, Lloyd, J. A Strategy for the Protestant Colleges. Philadelphia, PA: Westminster, 1966. Kemeny, Paul Charles. Princeton in the Nation’s Service.

In Philosophers Who Believe several key thinkers answer this question with unusual candor, warmth and brilliance. Basil Mitchell Oxford University, author of such groundbreaking books as The Justification of Religious Belief. Contributors include: Alvin Plantinga University of Notre Dame, considered the world's leading Protestant philosopher of God.

of the book it will help anyone who finds similarities in the book relate it to their own life and understand. Christians, coma recovery people, lover's, widowers, tragedy survivors, Athletes (swimmers). III. About the Author.

Gilbert’s book Eat, Pray, Love details the spiritual journey of someone in a tremendous amount of pain, to a.

Gilbert’s book Eat, Pray, Love details the spiritual journey of someone in a tremendous amount of pain, to a balanced, loving human. Her story has resonated with readers everywhere, landing on the New York Times bestseller list, and eventually being made into a movie starring Julia Roberts. 10. Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson. Mitch Albom’s book, Tuesdays with Morrie based on a series of interviews with Morrie Schwartz, his former professor who was dying of Lou Gehrig’s disease, has sold countless copies and inspired a TV movie starring Hank Azaria and Jack Lemmon.

Often the university is seen as a hothouse of anti-Christian bias. Every other belief system, no matter how exotic, seems to receive more respect and support than historic Christian belief. Yet even in this environment, steadily and certainly, men and women of faith have continued to hold and grow in their confidence in Christ. Here are the stories of twenty-two such Christian faculty, who tell in their own words the difference that Christ has made in their lives and their work. Respected and accomplished in a variety of academic disciplines, these believers have come to a strong understanding of their faith within their professions. They have wrestled with the issues of a complex world and found meaning and purpose through their spiritual journeys. These very personal stories offer thoughtful models of how faith can not only survive but thrive in the university world.
  • time to take the offensive in love

  • the articles on the various professors are very good, it tells of the background where they from and how they became a believer of the Christian faith.

  • Very good book

  • The variety of different stories was fascinating. Real people with successes and failures.

  • There are few "big names" among the contributors to this volume: best-known are perhaps Marvin Olasky [author of books such as The Tragedy of American Compassion] and Edwin Yamauchi [author of books such as ].

    The Introduction to this 1998 book states, "The authors of these essays are members of the faculty at major secular research universities and are accomplished and respected in their profession. They have wrestled with these issues of life in our increasingly secular and complex world, and they have found meaning and purpose and value, the essence of life, in their Christian faith. Each essay is an account of an aspect of the author's own experience of Christian faith and its relevance to the academic enterprise, life in general and his or her own life. These essays are not theological treatises." (Pg. 12-13)

    One essayist admits, "Millions of people have claimed that Jesus has revealed himself to them in response to actions of honest surrender that are analogous to my own experience. If Christianity is basically on the right track, we expect this to happen. This is not to say that millions couldn't be self-deceived or couldn't be deceived as a group. Millions could, myself included... However, if Christianity is basically true, we would expect interaction between God and humans to take place. That is the Christian claim and it is an extremely important claim about the nature of human existence in the universe. If nothing ever happened, then either Jesus doesn't care or Jesus doesn't exist. In that case we need to face the cold reality with a stiff upper lip. It can be done. Millions of people face the starkness of a meaningless universe with courage. But I don't think it's necessary or conforms to the realities of our existence." (Pg. 72)

    Another says, "I sometimes marvel at the freedom that I have experienced as a Christian faculty member in a secular university. Part of that freedom stems from the value that the university places on diversity. It tolerates all beliefs and practices, including Christian ones. But this tolerance means nothing if we fail to act on it. I continually pray for boldness in my faith so that I may express beliefs, act in a manner consistent with those beliefs, and communicate respect and love for people who do not share my Christian faith... I am convinced that our colleges and universities desperately need Christian faculty to shine the light of Christ into the darkness that envelops many campuses... to be a fool for Christ is to offer real hope to searching students and faculty." (Pg. 104)

    Another essayist admits, "It is not easy to speak about Jesus in a world dancing between a modernism that worships humanity and reason and a postmodernism that denies the existence of universal truth. How do I persuade students that the quality that makes us human is our soul or spirit, which does not emerge simply from the brain or result from psychological needs to please or reject our parents and others? I remind students that most of them are in college today because they acted on faith. They believed that a college education was important. They took on faith the beliefs of their parents, friends and counselors. We are creatures of faith... This describes part of the scientific method. We assume rationality, explanations, and axioms---rules we assume to be true without a priori proof in order to study the actions or consequences that follow from them... We act on faith and could not function without it." (Pg. 135-136)

    An essayist who teaches philosophy observes, "I discovered early on that interest in the rationality of Christian belief may well not be welcomed in American churches that embrace mere Christianity. One reason for this is the impact of the privatization view within the church, which in many ways reflects the general culture... Another reason for this lack of interest is a slide that scholars and nonscholars easily make from (i) not everything about God can be known to (ii) God is incomprehensible to (iii) nothing can be known about God... Still another reason is the diminution that has occurred in much of American Christianity, for which conversion and evangelism, sometimes supplemented by social action, exhaust Christianity." (Pg. 212)

    This is an interesting--if not particularly "earth-shaking"---collection of essays, that will probably be of most interest to Christians (students AND faculty) in secular settings.

  • As mentioned in another review, there are a wide variety of essays in this book, varying both in length and subject. Some of the essays are personal ones on how the author became a Christian, some are on the integration of Christianity into the classroom (explicitly or implicitly), and some are expositions on Christian theory (the need for a personal relationship with Christ, for instance). The quality also varies widely, or rather, the use of a given essay to a particular reader will vary widely. I found the personal reminiscences to be quite useful/interesting. Unfortunately, those essays that dealt with the "theology" of Christianity were not nearly as good as a group. I think this is because people that are not theologians (or philosophers) are out of their element when writing in philosophical terms. They seem a little amateur, and overlap significantly (not surprising, since many Christians will have similar ideas on what is important).
    My second disappointment was with the number of essays involving the relationship between being a Christian and teaching in a (usually) secular university. The title of the book lead me to believe there would be many more essays on this topic, but usually the fact that the author is a professor is irrelevant or of insignificant importance to the essay. I found the essays that dealt with this subject to be the most interesting and useful, being myself a professor at a secular university.
    The most pleasant surprise of this book is the wide variety of backgrounds of the authors. There are people from numerous denominations, from Roman Catholics to biblical fundamentalists to African American Baptists. This variety is important and, I think, necessary, because there is far too much internicene squabbling amongst Christian denominations - this book makes clear that different methods of worship work for different people, and variety can serve to strengthen the Christian community, not weaken it. The professional disciplines of the authors also vary widely, from English literature to nursing to astronony.
    Generally, this book is interesting and helpful, if suffering from some repitition. This is probably the nature of such an anthology, as I assume the authors were given a wide latitude on subject matter. I would like to have seen more essays on the merger of Christianity with academia.