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ePub The Terrible Speed of Mercy: A Spiritual Biography of Flannery O'Connor download

by Jonathan Rogers

ePub The Terrible Speed of Mercy: A Spiritual Biography of Flannery O'Connor download
Author:
Jonathan Rogers
ISBN13:
978-1595550231
ISBN:
1595550232
Language:
Publisher:
Thomas Nelson; 1St Edition edition (September 17, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Arts & Literature
ePub file:
1711 kb
Fb2 file:
1822 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
565

The depiction of O'Connor that Rogers presents in The Terrible Speed of Mercy resonated with me so deeply I can't help but find her a kindred.

The depiction of O'Connor that Rogers presents in The Terrible Speed of Mercy resonated with me so deeply I can't help but find her a kindred. Highly recommend even if you are a Flannery novice. Without a doubt this is the best biography of Flannery O’Connor. I could not put it down. The reader will fully understand the relationship between her humor, faith, and literary zeal to reach her readers before her approach info deatg.

In this biography, Jonathan Rogers gets at the heart of O’Connor’s work. We decided to read Rogers book about her together alongside the stories. I am so glad we did it. He follows the roots of her fervent Catholicism and traces the outlines of a life marked by illness and suffering, but ultimately defined by an irrepressible joy and even hilarity. In her stories, and in her life story, Flannery O’Connor extends a hand in the dark, warning and reassuring us of the terrible speed of mercy. Sep 08, 2019 Cindy Rollins rated it it was amazing.

208 pages, softcover. In her stories, and in her life story, Flannery O’Connor extends a hand in the dark, warning and reassuring us of the terrible speed of mercy

208 pages, softcover. The Terrible Speed of Mercy: A Spiritual Biography of Flannery O'Connor (9781595550231) by Jonathan Rogers. Author Bio. ▼▲. Jonathan Rogers received his undergraduate degree from Furman University in South Carolina and holds a P. in seventeenth-century English literature from Vanderbilt University. The Rogers family lives in Nashville, Tennessee, where Jonathan makes a living as a writer.

Flannery O'Connor Biography. Flannery O'Connor was born on March 25, 1925, in Savannah, Georgia. Her father died of systemic lupus erythematosus when she was a teenager. She studied writing at the University of Iowa and published The Geranium, her first short story, in 1946. She wrote novels, but was best known for her short story collections. She died of lupus in 1964 after fighting it for more than 10 years. Early Life and Education. Born on March 25, 1925, in Savannah, Georgia, Flannery O'Connor is considered one of the greatest short story writers of the 20th century.

In 1951, Flannery O'Connor returned to her home state of Georgia, where she had grown up, after being diagnosed with a form of. .The Terrible Speed of Mercy: A Spiritual Biography of Flannery O'Connor. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2012: 48.

In 1951, Flannery O'Connor returned to her home state of Georgia, where she had grown up, after being diagnosed with a form of lupus. She first lived in the family home of her mother, Regina, on Greene Street in Milledgeville, then owned by her uncles Louis and Bernard Cline. There, she finished her manuscript for her novel Wise Blood and, with her health improving, she moved with her mother to Andalusia, then still a working farm. ISBN 978-1-59555-023-1.

Flannery O'Connor Biography - Mary Flannery O'Connor was born in Savannah, Georgia, the only . Mary also published two other books of short stories: A Good Man Is Hard to Find (1955) and Everything That Rises Must Converge (1965).

Flannery O'Connor Biography - Mary Flannery O'Connor was born in Savannah, Georgia, the only child of Regine Cline and Edwin Francis O'Connor. Her writing style as inspired by the grotesque, O’Connor has been quoted saying Anything that comes out of the South is going to be called grotesque by the northern reader, unless it is grotesque, in which case it is going to be called realistic.

Flannery O'Connor Flannery O'Connor's work has been described as "profane, blasphemous, and outrageous. ISBN13: 9781595550231.

Jonathan Rogers is the author of The Terrible Speed of Mercy: A Spiritual Biography of Flannery O’Connor, and a number of other books, including the acclaimed Wilderking trilogy. He holds a PhD in English literature from Vanderbilt University. He is a contributor to the Rabbit Room, and maintains a personal blog. Today, I’ve asked him to join me for a discussion about the legacy of Flannery O’Connor. Trevin Wax: What initially attracted you to Flannery O’Connor’s work? Jonathan Rogers: I grew up in Middle Georgia, fifty miles from Flannery O’Connor’s Milledgeville

Flannery O’Connor’s work has been described as profane, blasphemous, and outrageous. But perhaps the most shocking thing about Flannery O’Connor’s fiction is the fact that it is shaped by a thoroughly Christian vision.

Flannery O’Connor’s work has been described as profane, blasphemous, and outrageous. Her stories are peopled by a sordid caravan of murderers and thieves, prostitutes and bigots whose lives are punctuated by horror and sudden violence. If the world she depicts is dark and terrifying, it is also the place where grace makes itself known.

I am not particularly sure why The Terrible Speed of Mercy has the subtitle, A Spiritual Biography. It is a biography and it does talk a lot about her spiritual life

I am not particularly sure why The Terrible Speed of Mercy has the subtitle, A Spiritual Biography. It is a biography and it does talk a lot about her spiritual life. But not any more than what most Christian biographies of Christians do. Her faith was real and important to her. Her stories were an outgrowth of that faith. But this is not a spiritual biography in the way that Devin Brown’s biography of CS Lewis is a spiritual biography. That is not to say that The Terrible Speed of Mercy is not worth reading. I think it is a good introductory biography.

“Many of my ardent admirers would be roundly shocked and disturbed if they realized that everything I believe is thoroughly moral, thoroughly Catholic, and that it is these beliefs that give my work its chief characteristics.”

—Flannery O’Connor

Flannery O’Connor’s work has been described as “profane, blasphemous, and outrageous.” Her stories are peopled by a sordid caravan of murderers and thieves, prostitutes and bigots whose lives are punctuated by horror and sudden violence. But perhaps the most shocking thing about Flannery O’Connor’s fiction is the fact that it is shaped by a thoroughly Christian vision. If the world she depicts is dark and terrifying, it is also the place where grace makes itself known. Her world—our world—is the stage whereon the divine comedy plays out; the freakishness and violence in O’Connor’s stories, so often mistaken for a kind of misanthropy or even nihilism, turn out to be a call to mercy.

In this biography, Jonathan Rogers gets at the heart of O’Connor’s work. He follows the roots of her fervent Catholicism and traces the outlines of a life marked by illness and suffering, but ultimately defined by an irrepressible joy and even hilarity. In her stories, and in her life story, Flannery O’Connor extends a hand in the dark, warning and reassuring us of the terrible speed of mercy.

  • "And if Southern writers have a tendency to write about freaks, O'Connor remarked, 'it is because we are still able to recognize one'." - p. 21

    This is a beautifully crafted book. It was the most perfect orientation to the heart and mind of Flannery O'Connor and it gave me the confidence to meet her writing with the right openness of mind. I have long cringed at the name Flannery O'Connor presuming her work to be macabre and something unholy. As a Catholic and lover of classics I always puzzled over her name being connected with great modern Catholic writers but was too cowardly to meet her on her own terms. I credit Mr. Rogers with helping me to fall in love with this remarkable author and her important fiction.

    "And more than ever now it seems that the kingdom of heaven has to be taken by violence or not at all. You have to push as hard as the age that pushes you." The Habit of Being, 229.

    This beautiful biography has some spoilers in it for the new O'Connor reader - but I confess - those spoilers were a mercy to me. Knowing the fate of the grandmother prepared me and helped me to read the story with the right focus.

    I think that Mr. Rogers must really love Flannery O'Connor. He worked very hard to let her tell her own self story by citing countless letters and essays. While he gave us the outline, he filled it in with her own words and ideas and did it in a way that felt relaxed, friendly and intelligent - like his subject herself. He showed profound respect for her theology and faith and worked hard to help the reader understand how those beliefs influenced O'Connor's attitudes and writing.

    I genuinely feel like I have met and chatted with this remarkable soul thanks to Mr. Rogers. I sobbed at her death and appreciated his beautiful treatment of it.

    "It is remarkable to think about this woman - who had made a name for herself with stories of earthly terror and grotesquerie - meditating every day on the province of joy, lest she be ignorant of the concerns of her true country. All that darkness was in the service of eternal brightness. All that violence was in the service of peace and serenity." (p 162)

  • Admittedly, I hadn't read anything by O'Conner prior to reading this book. I intended on it but my reading list is so lengthy I hadn't gotten to it yet. Now, I've made her works a priority.

    The depiction of O'Connor that Rogers presents in The Terrible Speed of Mercy resonated with me so deeply I can't help but find her a kindred.

    A very well written and researched book. Highly recommend even if you are a Flannery novice.

  • It's an excellent short biography of O'Connor, but I am puzzled as to why it is called a "spiritual biography." As far my limited powers can tell, it is really just a shorter biography which cannot avoid discussing spirituality, given how important that was to O'Connor. At any rate, the book should still be read on the merits of its excellent, clear style and the biographical details it gives.

  • Without a doubt this is the best biography of Flannery O’Connor. I could not put it down. The reader will fully understand the relationship between her humor, faith, and literary zeal to reach her readers before her approach info deatg

  • This is an enjoyable, informative, well written book about a remarkable person. Please give yourself a gift and read this book. You'll fall in love with Flannery O'Connor too! Thank you, Mr. Rogers, for writing this worthy tribute to O'Connor.

  • This little book gives more insight into Flannery O'Connor than anything else I have ever read about her. Her stories cannot be understood by people who do not understand her Christianity. Well done!

  • Interesting book and worth reading. Well written. I had not read a biography about her before, so this was my introduction to her life.

  • Really enjoyed following this writer through Flanagan's life! Beautifully written.