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by May Sarton

ePub At Seventy: A Journal [LARGE PRINT] download
Author:
May Sarton
ISBN13:
978-0893407926
ISBN:
0893407925
Language:
Publisher:
John Curley & Associates (1984)
Category:
Subcategory:
Arts & Literature
ePub file:
1671 kb
Fb2 file:
1875 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf mobi lit
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
561

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At Seventy: A Journal has been added to your Cart. I have read most things May Sarton wrote and I read "At Seventy" about twenty years ago. I am reading it again as I am about to turn 70 and it is more delightful and insightful than the first time I read it. Sarton's journals are not to be missed as she takes us through her days. with superb writing, insight, and her amazing, wondrous gift to see into the marrow of whatever she is writing about.

At seventy : a journal. by. Sarton, May, 1912-1995. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by MerciG on September 8, 2010. Sarton, May, 1912-1995, Sarton, May, Authors, American. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). Sarton, May, 1912-1995, Sarton, May, Authors, American, Authors, American Diaries 20th century, Sarton, May Diaries, Authors, American, Authors, American Diaries 20th century, Sarton, May Diaries. t on November 4, 2011.

At Seventy: A Journal. May Sarton’s honest and engrossing journal of her seventieth year, spent living and working on the Maine coast. May Sarton’s journals are a captivating look at a rich artistic life. In this, her ode to aging, she savors the daily pleasures of tending to her garden, caring for her dogs, and entertaining guests at her beloved Maine home by the sea. Her reminiscences are raw, and her observations are infused with the poetic candor for which Sarton-over the course of her decades-long career-became known.

May Sarton ranks with the very best of our distinguished novelists. A Shower of Summer Days establishes once and for all her unmistakable authority. The New York Times The Irish estate home Dene's Court has been empty for years-its icy visage, shuttered windows, and overgrown tennis court are a burden for its caretakers and a curiosity for the nearby townspeople. May Sarton charts her second act in Maine in this graceful elegy about life, love, work, and growing older When May Sarton uprooted her life after fifteen years in the refurbished New Hampshire house with the garden she tended so lovingly, she relied solely on instinct.

May Sarton is the pen name of Eleanore Marie Sarton (May 3, 1912 – July 16, 1995), a prolific American poet, novelist and memoirist. She is considered an important contemporary figure in American literature, as well as a "poet's poet", and is lauded by literary and feminist critics for her works addressing themes in gender, sexuality, and universality

At Seventy: A Journal. ISBN 9780393018387 (978-0-393-01838-7) Hardcover, W W Norton & Co Inc, 1984. Find signed collectible books: 'At Seventy: A Journal'. The Education of Harriet Hatfield: A Novel. Learn More at LibraryThing. May Sarton at LibraryThing. Results page: PREV 1 2 3 4. In her latest journal, st Sarton chronicles the year from her seventieth birthday on May 3, 1982-now conscious of her age, and open about her homosexuality. Having fought through depression (Recovering, 1980), she lives ""more completely in the moment. She ponders how to balance creative work, the obligations of friendship, and professional e lecturings, book-signings, the towering mass of correspondence.

Sarton has fashioned her journals, 'sonatas'as she calls them, into a distinctive literary form: relaxed yet shapely, a silky weave of. .May Sarton-poet, novelist, and chronicler-occupies a special place in American letters.

Sarton has fashioned her journals, 'sonatas'as she calls them, into a distinctive literary form: relaxed yet shapely, a silky weave of reflection. with the reader made companion to her inmost thoughts. This new journal chronicles the year that began on May 3, 1982, her seventieth birthday. At her home in Maine, she savors "the experience of being alive in this beautiful place," reflecting on nature, friends, and work

  • I gave this one the benefit of the doubt. In all honesty, to me it's worth 3.5 stars. I truly enjoy May Sarton's journals when she writes about her most personal feelings--her anger, her sadness, her frustrations. There is more of her angst in her later journals. This seemed like one of her most "flowery" journals (focused on her garden) and one of her most historical and political journals. She frequently dwells on the suffering of her fellow humans in this one--whether it be the Holocaust or a recent news item featuring a gang rape. These things can detract from the soothing images we have come to expect in May Sarton's journals. I want to add a little story from my own life in regard to the Bedford, Massachusetts gang rape Sarton agonized over in this journal. I was in my thirties when I read about this horrific crime in the newspaper. Like Sarton, I couldn't get it out of my mind. I asked the Lord for his help. Then I went to the mall. Well, the Lord must have had angels on duty that day because I was struck by two of the most delightful young men. I saw one through the window of a jewelry store. He, with the help of a young saleswoman, was selecting a diamond ring. His smile was warm and his eyes were sparkly. The second young man I saw was sitting in the pit that was built for people with young children--the toddlers were running around--and he was helping a young woman, whom I assumed to be his wife or partner, diaper their baby. He could have been the other young man's twin--he had the same warm smile and sparkly eyes! And then I said, "Okay, Lord, I get it now! There is evil in the world. But there is a lot of good too!" Now I am happy that Sarton includes many stories in this book about admirable men and women whom she knows. But I will admit that the stories reminded me a little of the stories you might find in a Reader's Digest. Nice stories but maybe not anything I'd like to reread. It's when she gets up close and personal and writes about the way her emotions get the best of her sometimes that really resonates with me, and I don't know if I can recall one such instance in this book although I imagine there was at least one. I think this one reminds me a little of Doris Grumbach's stories who writes memoirs that tend to get political and focused on people we don't know. And I want to say, "Doris, tell me about you!" The one frustration that May has throughout the book is keeping up with her high volume of correspondence, but this frustration is part of all of her journals, I believe, so nothing new. I like May Sarton a lot, and I certainly would rather have been reading this than many of the trashy books out there. But there have been some that were more my cup of tea.

  • At 70, May Sarton was struggling to keep up her lifestyle - writing, presenting, traveling, gardening - and finding she needed more time to herself, more time for solitude and reflection. She was giving of herself too generously and wearing herself out. Reading Sarton's journal is like a visit with her, her strength, warmth and kindness a strong presence. Although aware she was writing what would be published (a strange situation to someone like myself who keeps a strictly private journal!), reading her journal feels not intrusive but a privilege. She invented another kind of journaling, a conversation with those who would come after her. Now in my mid-70's, I am learning from her as well as from my own experience to mollycoddle myself a tad and let younger generations do the work of the world. Bless you, May Sarton, for leaving us this treasure! Women in their sixties and seventyish should read this.

  • May Sarton is famous for her poetry, plays and novels, but it is her journals that speak to me the most. She writes about the tension she feels with the tug and pull between her love of solitude and the joy she experiences with groups of people, the pleasures of living alone and the worry about her independence as she ages.

    I recommend this book to anyone living alone at this age and curious about how another person experiences the milestone.

  • May Sarton -- terrific, realistic, a talented memoirist. I wish I could have known her. While all of her books, at least the memoirs, are somewhat similar, they are filled with realistic observations about life, gardens, birds, dogs and cats, friendship and living alone. I've read all her diaries, and if you are into gardens and gardening, valuing your friends and living alone, you will probably recognize yourself in these books. Sadly, her loneliness and desperateness (at times) is painful -- especially if you have (or have had) those feelings. I highly recommend May
    Sarton's diaries.

  • I have read most things May Sarton wrote and I read "At Seventy" about twenty years ago. I am reading it again as I am about to turn 70 and it is more delightful and insightful than the first time I read it. Sarton's journals are not to be missed as she takes us through her days ... some joyful, others not so ... with superb writing, insight, and her amazing, wondrous gift to see into the marrow of whatever she is writing about. Even her journals are poetry. Brava!

  • Sarton has a spare but expressive writing style. She portrays herself as a struggling author trying to balance her need for solitude in which to think and write, maintain a limited social life and the endless maintenance required in her rambling old house in the country.

  • I love every journal and memoir May Sarton has ever written, and this one didn't disappoint. Actually this is the second time I've read this one because I'm turning 70 this year. Solitude with just a little bit of socializing, along with plenty of flowers and the changing seasons, seems like the perfect recipe for happiness -- at least if you're no longer actively involved in a love relationship.

  • I have read several other of May Sarton memoirs & now that I am turning 70, I thought the above was appropriate. Some friends who have read Sarton think that her memoirs are mundane. I personally love how she walks you through her simple daily events & then interjects a thoughtful
    universal observation. Life doesn't have to be constantly exciting to be fulfilling & interesting.