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ePub Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle download

by Alan Clayson,Pauline Sutcliffe

ePub Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle download
Author:
Alan Clayson,Pauline Sutcliffe
ISBN13:
978-0330335805
ISBN:
0330335804
Language:
Publisher:
Trans-Atlantic Pubns; 1 edition (July 1, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
Arts & Literature
ePub file:
1385 kb
Fb2 file:
1488 kb
Other formats:
doc docx lrf mobi
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
660

Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle (1994) Alan Clayson and Pauline Sutcliffe The Beatles Shadow, Stuart Sutcliffe, & His Lonely Hearts Club (2001) Pauline Sutcliffe and Douglas Thompson.

Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle (1994) Alan Clayson and Pauline Sutcliffe. Stuart, The Life and Art of Stuart Sutcliffe (1995) Pauline Sutcliffe and Kay Williams. The Beatles Shadow, Stuart Sutcliffe, & His Lonely Hearts Club (2001) Pauline Sutcliffe and Douglas Thompson. Stuart Sutcliffe: a retrospective (2008) Matthew H. Clough and Colin Fallows. Baby's in Black (2010) Arne Bellstorf.

Start by marking Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle as Want to Read . This is the official tie-in book to a 1995 film about The Beatles.

Start by marking Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe: The Lost Beatle as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The film is a mixture of humour, pathos and foot-tapping rock 'n' roll, and focuses on the "lost Beatle", Stuart Sutcliffe. While he is still making regular concert appearances, he has become better known as an author of around thirty books - mostly musical biography.

This is the official tie-in book to a 1995 film about The Beatles

This is the official tie-in book to a 1995 film about The Beatles.

Backbeat, Stuart Sutcliffe, The Lost Beatle (1994) Alan Clayson and Pauline Sutcliffe (Pan Books, Sidgwick & Jackson). The Beatles Shadow, STUART SUTCLIFFE, & his lonely hearts club (2001) Pauline Sutcliffe and Douglas Thompson (Sidgwick & Jackson, an imprint of Pan Macmillan Ltd).

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Backbeat: Stuart Sutcliffe - The Lost Beatle . Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear.

Pauline Sutcliffe, Alan Clayson. The film is a mixture of humour, pathos and foot-tapping rock 'n' roll, and focuses on the "lost Beatle", Stuart Sutcliffe

Pauline Sutcliffe, Alan Clayson.

Stuart Sutcliffe, the other Beatle. The brief life of a talented painter and passable bassist. Upon joining, Sutcliffe and Lennon lit upon the idea of "beetles" as a nod to Buddy Holly and the Crickets. Stuart Sutcliffe poses for a portrait in Liverpool, England. Image: Bettmann/Corbis. Over the next few months, that name evolved into the Silver Beetles, then the Silver Beatles, and finally to the Beatles. An early version of the Beatles, photographed by John Lennon: manager Allan Williams, his wife Beryl, business partner Lord Woodbine, Stuart Sutcliffe, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Pete Best.

This is the official tie-in book to a 1995 film about The Beatles. The film is a mixture of humour, pathos and foot-tapping rock 'n' roll, and focuses on the "lost Beatle", Stuart Sutcliffe.
  • the print in this paperback edition is so small you need (really) a magnifying glass to read it. sadly, i wasn't willing to do that. looking for another edition, or the kindle version, which is not yet available, and i wish it were. eager to read this book. there seems to be only this one edition, which is too bad.

  • This book does not rehash the film. It is co-written by Pauline, Stuart's sister and has some input from Astrid Kirchherr. I preferred the biography to the film as the film was too stylised. What comes across in the book is the forging of the Beatles in Hamburg to the force they became. It is as much a social history of music (and Mersey music) of those times. It paints the optimism and ugliness of the early sixties (part misogyny and ruthless ambition). Fanzine stuff on a level, but these were mainly youngsters trying to get rich and famous and many did not achieve either. It is also another insight of the personalities of the three main Beatles (Pete Best is more in the frame here) before success. They are painted as they were, teenagers, rather than tainted with hindsight, the cult of personality they became. Stuart Sutcliffe emerges as the most comfortable in his own skin, even at an early age. His sudden death was likely a loss to English art as it was evident he had major talent in that area. But not in music and not as a foil to the Lennon-McCartney dyad. That is where I differ from the subtitle of the "lost Beatle". He was never a Beatle but he was more significant than that. He was Stuart Sutcliffe.

  • I had seen the movie twice, when it had first come out, and was rather impressed. BUT, then, over the next many years, I have read nearly everything I could find about the early Beatles years, and Stu, Astrid, Klaus, etc. (I have not read the book by Stu's sister, and probablly won't.)

    'Backbeat' is sort of like the 'Harry Potter' movies; they are sort of well done, and sort of fun and easy to watch, (an hour or so of watching, rather than hours and hours of reading...) BUT the HP movies are often SO different from the books. Now, we can easily compare the HP books and movies, there they both are...it is WAY less easy to compare the 'Backbeat' movie, and all the books about Stu and the early Beatles; and too much is too different.

    Stu was already OUT of the band when they did the 'My Bonnie' recording. The Beatles had a much differnet sound than the movie group does. The Beatles went home seprately at the end of the first trip. The move to the 'Top Ten' was on their second trip. Stu had many, many attacks of headaches while living at Atrids home (and probably NEVER attacked Klaus and Astrid!!!). He died on the way to the hospital in her arms. Etc, etc, etc... The 'real' story, as best we can figure it out from many books is already a very real, very eventful, VERY emotional story. Why did the 'Backbeat' crew need to change so much?

    After watching the Harry Potter movies once or twice, you almost forget that they are INCORRECT, and you forget the REAL stories of the books. After watching 'Backbeat' once or a few too many times, you might start thinking that this really happened.

    A mostly fun movie, but too often too far from what probably really happened. It is a fantasy, NOT a documentary!!!

    (Ooops, realized I reviewed the book form, and not the DVD; but probably the same applied? Must be the same thing?)