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ePub John Betjeman: The Biography download

by Bevis Hillier

ePub John Betjeman: The Biography download
Author:
Bevis Hillier
ISBN13:
978-0719564437
ISBN:
0719564433
Language:
Publisher:
John Murray (October 1, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Arts & Literature
ePub file:
1149 kb
Fb2 file:
1953 kb
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
158

This book is a distillation of Bevis Hillier's three-volume biography, authorized by Betjeman himself.

This biography takes the reader from Betjeman's troubled childhood in north. This book is a distillation of Bevis Hillier's three-volume biography, authorized by Betjeman himself.

The John Betjeman Centre Memorabilia Room showing the office from his home in. .By 1948 Betjeman had published more than a dozen books. Hillier, Bevis (2006). Betjeman: the biography.

The John Betjeman Centre Memorabilia Room showing the office from his home in Trebetherick. Betjeman left Oxford without a degree. Whilst there, however, he had made the acquaintance of people who would later influence his work, including Louis MacNeice and W. H. Auden. He worked briefly as a private secretary, school teacher and film critic for the Evening Standard, where he also wrote for their high-society gossip column, the Londoner's Diary.

John Betjeman: The Biography Paperback – 26 July 2007 . by Bevis Hillier (Author). Bevis Hillier has devoted more than twenty-five years to writing Betjeman& life, a task entrusted to him by the poet himself. Like Betjeman he was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford. A book representing, perhaps, the last typesetting to favour us with a circumflex over the "o" of rôle; this lifetime's labour would have bettered "The Life Of Johnson"; but Betjeman, though entertaining and remarkable, shirked growing up to be wise. The Spectator of 16th November, 2002, carried .

Betjeman: The Bonus of Laughter by Bevis Hillier John Murray £25 . The book's psychological depth is balanced by the amplitude of its social survey

Betjeman: The Bonus of Laughter by Bevis Hillier John Murray £25, pp744. You can hardly write the life of another human being without devoting your own lifetime to it, and Bevis Hillier has more or less done so with John Betjeman. For him, the cherub was actually a malevolent leprechaun. The book's psychological depth is balanced by the amplitude of its social survey. Though Betjeman pretended to be an amiable dinosaur, he flourished in the dizzily revolutionary decades chronicled here.

John Betjeman : the biography. by. Hillier, Bevis, 1940-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Biography: general, Works by individual poets: from c 1900 -, Biography & Autobiography, Biography, Autobiography, phy, General, Biography & Autobiography, General, Literary, Betjeman, John, 1906-1984, Poets, English. London : John Murray. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 8, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

This book is a distillation of Bevis Hillier's three-volume biography, authorized by Betjeman himself. Format Paperback 608 pages. Dimensions 175 x 213 x 47mm 950g. Publication date 30 Oct 2006. Publisher John Murray Press. Imprint John Murray Publishers Ltd.

Shop our inventory for John Betjeman: The Biography by Bevis Hillier with fast free shipping on every used book we have in stock! . John Betjeman was the best-loved English poet since Tennyson and became an institution - a 'teddy bear to the nation'.

Bevis Hillier’s three volumes, drawing on a staggering array of first-hand reminiscences, interviews, letters and . Is Betjeman worth it? Absolutely

Is Betjeman worth it? Absolutely. He had a wholly original vision, and he followed it courageously, undeterred by mockery and detraction.

John Betjeman: The Biography. Author:Hillier, Bevis. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. This biography takes the reader from Betjeman's troubled childhood in rth London, through his blossoming at Oxford; a gay fling with W. Auden; a clandestine marriage to a field marshal's daughter; pranks as a film critic; wartime service and probable espionage in Ireland, to the glory days of his later years when his Collected Poems became a runaway bestseller.

John Betjeman's biography and life story. Betjeman, John (1982). Uncollected poems: with a foreword by Bevis Hillier. Betjeman, John (2005). Sir John Betjeman, CBE was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Who's Who as a "poet and hack". He was a founding member. Five of these were verse collections, including one in the USA. Sales of his Collected Poems in 1958 reached 100,000. The popularity of the book prompted Ken Russell to make a film about him, John Betjeman: A Poet in London (1959).

This biography takes the reader from Betjeman's troubled childhood in north London, through his blossoming at Oxford; a gay fling with W. H. Auden; a clandestine marriage to a field marshal's daughter; pranks as a film critic; wartime service and probable espionage in Ireland, to the glory days of his later years when his Collected Poems became a runaway bestseller. This book is a distillation of Bevis Hillier's three-volume biography, authorized by Betjeman himself.
  • Bevis Hillier's second volume of his Betjeman biography is a massive, extremely detailed work which will appeal to the same audience that enjoyed the first volume, Young Betjeman. The book follows JB's life and career from the early days of his marriage to Penelope Chetwode in the early thirties to the massive success of his "Collected Poems" in the late fifties.
    Don't expect any opinions on Betjeman's poetry, except for excerpts from contemporary reviews. This is a book about his life, not his work. And what a life! At the start of his career, working as a film critic on the Evening Standard, his colleagues included Robert Bruce Lockhart (the celebrated/notorious "British Agent"), Malcolm Muggeridge and Osbert Lancaster, who became his lifelong friend. He was an unabashed social climber starting from his days at Oxford, and managed to charm his way into the very top echelons of British and Irish society.
    Bevis Hillier has a clear, neutral and unobtrusive writing style that makes for easy reading. Having said that, this is a non-fiction book and not a "page-turner". It took several weeks of bed time reading and the wealth of detail would be too much to take in over a short period. It would also spoil the enjoyment of the book not to take time to mull over some of the episodes.
    There are several hundred notes at the end of the book, almost all of them attributions, but with the occasional anecdote. After using a second bookmark for a little while, I decided to just read the book. Having finished it, I then read through the more interesting notes. Among these was the information that Lady Elizabeth Cavendish (Betjeman's long-time companion), along with Arthur Calder-Marshall (who?), was the only person who refused to provide any help whatsoever with the book.
    This book, along with the preceding volume and the third, expected later this year, took twenty-five years to assemble. Many of the interviewees are now deceased. We can be thankful that Bevis Hillier had the tenacity to gather this information, and the skill to put it together with such grace.

  • A book representing, perhaps, the last typesetting to favour us with a circumflex over the "o" of rôle; this lifetime's labour would have bettered "The Life Of Johnson"; but Betjeman, though entertaining and remarkable, shirked growing up to be wise.

    The Spectator of 16th November, 2002, carried A.N.Wilson's review of this volume: "a hopeless mishmash of a book... Some reviewers would say that it was badly written, but the trouble is, it isn't really written at all."

    Wikipedia does not tell the whole story; but confirms that, in revenge for the vindictive idleness of this review, Bevis Hillier concocted a hoax letter to ensure that A.N. would take his work more seriously when working on the biography of his own that would called "Betjeman".

    Who was the "Greta Hellstrom" in the title of Betjeman's 1922 poem that begins: "Had I kissed and drawn you to me..." that ends "Oh! Dungarvan in the rain". We are told that Philip Larkin puzzled over this for decades. "Like the "Mr W.H." conundrum, the matter is likely to remain a tantalizing mystery - unless, some day, a cache of hitherto unknown letters should come to light, with indisputable revelations." Hillier inclines to believe that Honor Tracy is the woman. The temptation to fake the missing proof must have been tantalising. The first letter of each sentence of the hoax letter, that does do this, spelled out "A.N.Wilson is a [word]" ; a mild enough expletive, but one which, brightening a work such as this, threatens the egregious reviewer with the silence of Amazonian rejection. Justice was done. An abysmal reviewer was reviewed. The ignominy for the hoaxer was denying it soon after "the letter" was published on Page 155 of the now collectable first printing of Wilson's book; my copy of which (with the letter excised) proves Hillier's acrostic contention beyond doubt.

    Hillier decided early on that, to include all the clippings and the disparate strands of Betjeman's life, he would have to divide his book into discrete chapters whose timelines would overlap. To be fair, perhaps, under the burden of time as much as by the weight of the book, A.N.Wilson only opened the chapter "Tame and Tide"; the turgid detail of which should have been left in the archives; but it is a rare chapter. All along the middle way this biography is peppered with humour and laughter, gossip about the establishment, royalty and the cosy world of the early BBC, UK secret services, Mrs Orwell's Ministry of Information and self-serving who went "up to" Oxford. Sidney Bernstein's "main contention was that propaganda must be completely concealed behind a screen of entertainment." The book depicts a sleazy privileged, self-righteous group where TV presenters, as forgotten now as their programmes, jostled with Princess Margaret and the gentry. Quite rightly, the curious are indulged with no less than FOUR photographs of the Spartan accommodation that Anthony Armstrong-Jones offered Betjeman for a while, which the exotically beautiful Princess Margaret crossed the Thames to reach by the Deptford ferry, "incognito, muffled up and unrecognisable to have drinks with Armstrong-Jones in the Rotherhithe flat, after an official visit with Lady Elizabeth to the Dockland Settlement in the Isle of Dogs."

    Betjeman's Daily Herald reviews provide a rich vein of material. Hillier believes Betjeman "treats his readers as intimates, allowing them to see the depressed state of his mind": Films are "temporary relief from the misery of being alive"; "an event in my gloomy existence."

    Here, from the Herald, Betjeman on the hopelessness of translating poetry: "Translation does not, because it cannot, preserve the poetry. Indeed it is worth learning Greek simply to read Homer: just take one of Homer's great and best known phrases "polyewfloisboyolasseez" (I write it phonetically). That means, literally translated, "of the loud-sounding sea". It doesn't seem great shakes in English. But roll the Greek over on your tongue again slowly and hear if it does not describe a breaker tumbling about in foam and finally hissing up the shingle." Betjeman always saw himself at school, not only as the teacher one could love, but also as the precocious boy who would try the patience of the best.

    Like Wodehouse, who recalled Shakespeare's "the fretful porpentine"; laughing at school till he died; Betjeman is tickled by the word "Remembrancer". "A term applied in England to several officers, having various functions, their duty originally being to bring certain matters to the attention of the proper persons at the proper time." We laugh too. On page 547 our prankster telephones "The City Rembrancer" to ask exactly what it was that Betjeman had to remember that day.

    The Visionary: In June 1935 Betjeman wants to evolve a technique for short stories for radio: "with sound effects worked into the plot and taking the place of essential description".
    The Moralist: Speaking up on behalf of a patron who was boasting in a pub that he was claiming welfare for dependents who did not exist; Betjeman spoke out loud and bold of the realms of gold: "there are those restaurants where the waiter will buy your bill from you if you have paid in cash, and sell it to an executive who can show it in for expenses. I doubt if Mr James Morrison did that kind of thing. He was a boot-repairer."

    The Poet: "He is aware not only of the Saxon mouldings round the font but also of the tin bowl from the chain stores which the church-worker has left on top." A "particular intuition for knowing when a thing has been forgotten but is not yet decently out of date, for recognising the vanishing point of some word - electrolier metro-land and bringing it back to use with a shock of pathos so striking that these resurrected words become Betjeman-words."

    The Obtuse: "John took it for granted that his readers had been to public school."

    The Shyster: "John liked this kind of panel programme which required him to do no gruelling research, but just live by his wits."