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ePub Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of the Troubadours download

by Jean Markale

ePub Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of the Troubadours download
Author:
Jean Markale
ISBN13:
978-1594771958
ISBN:
1594771952
Language:
Publisher:
Inner Traditions (October 12, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1136 kb
Fb2 file:
1345 kb
Other formats:
txt lit azw mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
158

In a work of masterly scholarship, Jean Markale presents a fascinating portrait of a woman: history and myth intermingle as Eleanor, queen of France and England, is revealed as the embodiment of Guinevere and queen of the troubadours at her court of love. -Jill Line, author of Shakespeare and the Ideal of Love.

Eleanor of Aquitaine book. Markale argues that the troubadour songs about Eleanor place her in the literary pantheon of Guinevere and Melusine with varying success

Eleanor of Aquitaine book. A comprehensive view of the mythical and historic significance. Markale argues that the troubadour songs about Eleanor place her in the literary pantheon of Guinevere and Melusine with varying success. I am not convinced, but it was nice to read bit by bit.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204) has been long noted for her political and cultural achievements that profoundly shaped twelfth-century Europe. Culturally, beyond her role as wife of kings Louis VII of France and Henry II of England and mother of kings Richard and John, she inspired the huge diffusion of the Arthurian cycle and the Celtic myths underpinning it. Without Eleanor, figures such as Merlin, Arthur, and Guinevere (for whom Eleanor served as model) would never have assumed the enormous symbolic value they now possess.

Eleanor of Aquitaine. Queen of the Troubadours. A comprehensive view of the mythical and historic significance of the great medieval queen. Explains that courtly love was not a platonic and intellectual affectation but an initiatic process of male transcendence akin to Tantra. Shows that Eleanor’s embodiment of divine power undermined the pattern of patriarchy. Reveals how Eleanor inspired the powerful influence of the Arthurian cycle’s figures. Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204) has been long noted for her political and cultural achievements that profoundly shaped twelfth-century Europe.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122 – 1 April 1204) was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and England (1154–1189) and duchess of Aquitaine in her own right (1137–1204)

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122 – 1 April 1204) was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and England (1154–1189) and duchess of Aquitaine in her own right (1137–1204). As a member of the Ramnulfids (House of Poitiers) rulers in southwestern France, she was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe during the High Middle Ages. She was patron of literary figures such as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-Maure, and Bernart de Ventadorn

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If you are not satisfied with your purchase we well give you a full refund within 14 days of the your receipt of the goods. That is for one book or as many as you like.

Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of the Troubadours,Jean Markale. Eleanor Of Aquitaine: By the Wrath of God, Queen of England,Alison Weir

Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of the Troubadours,Jean Markale. Eleanor Of Aquitaine: By the Wrath of God, Queen of England,Alison Weir. Eleanor, April Queen of Aquitaine by Douglas Boyd Hardback Book The Cheap Fast. Was: Previous price£20.

Eleanor of Aquitaine is remembered as the determined and powerful wife of Henry II. Yet she had such a command of. . Yet she had such a command of England after Henry’s. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of France and England. November 21 at 7:43 AM ·. OMG! My article about Eleanor and Ermengarde of Narbonne is on the cover of History Today! This Month's Magazine December Issue.

Bienvenu, Jean-Marc Biographies des troubadours: textes provencaux des XHIe et XlVe siecles . Rosenberg, Melrich V. Eleanor of Aquitaine, Queen of the Troubadours and of the Courts of Love (Boston and New York, 1937).

Alienor d'Aquitaine et Fontevraud" (Cahiers de Civilisation Medievale 29, 1986). Biographies des troubadours: textes provencaux des XHIe et XlVe siecles (Paris, 1964). Feudal England: Historical Studies on the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries (London, 1895; reprinted London, 1964).

A comprehensive view of the mythical and historic significance of the great medieval queen • Explains that courtly love was not a platonic and intellectual affectation but an initiatic process of male transcendence akin to Tantra • Shows that Eleanor’s embodiment of divine power undermined the pattern of patriarchy • Reveals how Eleanor inspired the powerful influence of the Arthurian cycle’s figures Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122-1204) has been long noted for her political and cultural achievements that profoundly shaped twelfth-century Europe. Culturally, beyond her role as wife of kings Louis VII of France and Henry II of England and mother of kings Richard and John, she inspired the huge diffusion of the Arthurian cycle and the Celtic myths underpinning it. Without Eleanor, figures such as Merlin, Arthur, and Guinevere (for whom Eleanor served as model) would never have assumed the enormous symbolic value they now possess. Politically, she embodied divine power that ended the dark age of patriarchy, playing a crucial role not only in the development of the Plantagenet Empire, but also in the granting of charters to merchants and craftsmen that led to the birth of the modern middle class.But her greatest influence, still shaping modern sensibilities, was her role as the symbol of courtly love, which was not a mere diversion of the aristocracy but a process of male initiation and transcendence that bore a close resemblance to Indian Tantra. While the Virgin Mary was restoring a feminine face to medieval religious life, Eleanor embodied the adulterous queen who incarnates sovereignty--the woman who shares authority with the men who act in her name, but only after that power has been transmitted to them through an initiatory process leading to sexual union.
  • Eleanor of Aquitaine Is my hero - what can I say?. It is a well researched account of her life.

  • She is important with the history of love.

  • Jean Markale presents us with a very in depth look at Eleanor of Aquitaine, mother of King Richard the Lionhearted and King John and wife to both the King of France, Louis VII and the King of England, Henry II.

    The book is in three parts. The first part of the book is an in depth biography of the Queen, from her early youth thru her death. For those who would not be familiar with Eleanor, this section of the book is a must read. Mr. Markale does a wonderful job of making this a most interesting read, including all the references and all the stories that make this woman one of the most interesting historical figures of the time.

    The second part of the book takes a look at the instance of her divorce from Louis VII of France. While there is much speculated about this, it is the single most important piece of history at the time. It set the stage for the events that followed.

    There is much discussion here about what the duties of a Queen were at the time. The discussion follows the concept of "courtly love" or "fine amor" and also discusses the "indiscretions" that were alleged of Eleanor. There is evidence presented that there may have been many things going on at the courts at that time, and there is evidence to suggest that Eleanor was not only aware of it, but that she played it to her advantage. She was a maker of history, not just an observer.

    The final part of the book looks at the phenomenon of the Troubadours of the time, and how they played an important role in not only creating the literature and developing the culture of that time, but also how they played a part in communication and how they were responsible for the myths that were developed. There is some very interesting discussion of how one story of Tristan and Iseult becomes the story of Arthur and Guinevere. And how all these stories are most likely about Eleanor herself, or at least inspired by her.

    For the history alone this book is worth the read. Jean Markale is a wonderful weaver of story and history, and his style never bores. It is a credit to John Graham, the translator, that the material is kept as Mr. Markale intended; to weave the story, to look at the plots, subplots and court intrigues and yet still be interesting and involving the reader in the thoughts, the plot twists and assisting the reader to understand the conclusions that Mr. Markale draws. The last part, on the Troubadours, is an added bonus to the book looking at yet another aspect of the history at that time. It plays an important role as to how we see Eleanor today.

    If you are into medieval history at all, you will not want to pass up this book and it's valuable content. Eleanor is a singular figure causes history to change at this point in time and her impact cannot be ignored. And the presentation by Mr. Markale is just the vehicle you need to make it interesting and enjoyable to read. medievalcrusadesbabe

  • Jean Markale, a controversial French author retired to Celtic Brittany, has a background in writing about ancient, iconic feminine qualities. Markale's earlier titles suggest how he might approach Eleanor of Aquitaine. He had already written: 'Women of the Celts' (1987), 'The Great Goddess: Reverence of the Divine Feminine from the Paleolithic to the Present' (1999), and 'Cathedral of the Black Madonna: The Druids and the Mysteries of Chartres' (2004).

    Regarding those mysteries of Chartres with its womb-like labyrinth and Black Madonna, Queen Blanche of Castile encouraged the funding-drive for Chartres' new cathedral: she also donated windows. Blanche was a grand-daughter of Eleanor of Aquitaine whom the old queen personally selected and escorted across the Pyrenees to marry the heir to France. Young Blanche (12) and Eleanor (78) travelled north together from Burgos to Poitou in the spring of 1200. Months in private company with Eleanor must have helped to form and harden young Blanche's character. Markale knows the royal family lines through many centuries, and one suspects that he had been closing in on Eleanor as a subject for years before he wrote this book.

    In her time Eleanor of Aquitaine embodied, and knew that she embodied, iconic feminine qualities (the 'feminine ideal'?) that Markale treats in 'Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of the Troubadours'. Modern society celebrated these qualities in, say, Jackie Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe and Princess Diana. And Eleanor? In his third section, Markale shows how a troubadour press corps amplified Eleanor's persona. Here, with her coterie of troubadours, comes the twelfth century's "great goddess" and "reverence of the divine feminine." Markale may be controversial, but not necessarily wrong. He is entertaining and he captures the labyrinthine spiritual complexities of Eleanor's times.

    Robert Fripp,
    Author, Power of a Woman. Memoirs of...Eleanor of Aquitaine

    P.S.: Why did Markale's English-language publisher use an image of a woman clad in fashions of the early 1500s to adorn the cover of this book? The illustration (she may be Eleanor of Spain) does nothing for a fine book.

  • Huh?