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ePub Nature's Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick download

by Jenny Uglow

ePub Nature's Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick download
Author:
Jenny Uglow
ISBN13:
978-0226823911
ISBN:
0226823911
Language:
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (May 15, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1613 kb
Fb2 file:
1429 kb
Other formats:
docx mobi rtf lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
284

Nature's Engraver won the National Arts Writers Award in 2007. Jenny Uglow is the author of, among others, A Gambling Man: Charles II and the Restoration, which was shortlisted for the 2010 Samuel Johnson Prize, Lunar Men and In These Times.

Nature's Engraver won the National Arts Writers Award in 2007. The most perfect historian imaginable' Peter Ackroyd.

Nature's Engraver book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nature's Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

With this book, on the life, work, and world of Thomas Bewick, I experienced that delight again. You owe yourself a trip through Bewick's life with Jenny Uglow as your guide. It will be an experience you will treasure

With this book, on the life, work, and world of Thomas Bewick, I experienced that delight again. I took my time savoring this book and examining the beautiful reproductions of his work with a magnifying glass (since my eyes can no longer pick up all the detail). Frankly, I had never heard of Thomas Bewick and wanted to read the book because it is by such a wonderful author. He was an engraver who specialized in engraving in boxwood. It will be an experience you will treasure.

In the 1700s, the engraver Thomas Bewick captured England’s landscape like no one else. He possessed an extraordinary talent, Jenny Uglow writes in Nature’s Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick, and his skill has never been surpassed

In the 1700s, the engraver Thomas Bewick captured England’s landscape like no one else. He possessed an extraordinary talent, Jenny Uglow writes in Nature’s Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick, and his skill has never been surpassed. His art, she adds, touched the dawning Romantic age: Wordsworth was among the first to sing his praises, and Charlotte Brontë placed his prints of icy seas in the hands of her young heroine, Jane Eyre. Bewick was born in 1753 on a farm that lay along the banks of the River Tyne in Northumberland, the rough northern region in which he spent most of his life.

Nature's Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick. Faber & Faber, Limited.

In Nature’s Engraver, Jenny Uglow tells the story of the farmer’s son from Tyneside who became one of Britain’s greatest and most popular engravers. It is a story of violent change, radical politics, lost ways of life, and the beauty of the wild-a journey to the beginning of our lasting obsession with the natural world. A refined and engaging biography, as beautifully wrought, in its way, as Bewick’s woodcuts. Uglow’s clear prose sparkles like Bewick’s River Tyne. This is a lovely book, not just in the quality and sympathy of the writing but in the care.

A Life of Thomas Bewick. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. In this superb biography, Jenny Uglow tells the story of the farmer's son from Tyneside who influenced book illustration for a century to come

A Life of Thomas Bewick. In this superb biography, Jenny Uglow tells the story of the farmer's son from Tyneside who influenced book illustration for a century to come. It is a story of violent change, radical politics, lost ways of life, and the beauty of the wild - a journey to the beginning of our lasting obsession with the natural world. Marfield Prize Winner, Arts Club of WA Natl Award for Arts Writing - Winner. Connect with the author.

Thomas Bewick's History of British Birds marked the moment,. A beautifully illustrated biography of Thomas Bewick (1753-1828), the man whose art helped shape the way we view the natural world At the end of the eighteenth century, Britain, and much of the Western world, fell in love with nature.

Thomas Bewick's History of British Birds marked the moment, the first "field guide" for ordinary people, illustrated with woodcuts of astonishing accuracy and beauty. But his work was far more than a mere guide, for in the vivid vignettes scattered through the book, Bewick captured the vanishing world of rural English life.

Автор: Uglow Jennifer Название: Nature& Engraver: A Life of Thomas Bewick Издательство: Wiley Классификация: Искусство . Later passages in the work reveal Bewick's strongly held views on religion, politics and nature.

Later passages in the work reveal Bewick's strongly held views on religion, politics and nature.

Thomas Bewick’s (1753–1828) History of British Birds was the first field guide for ordinary people, illustrated with woodcuts of astonishing accuracy and beauty. In Nature’s Engraver, Jenny Uglow tells the story of the farmer’s son from Tyneside who became one of Britain’s greatest and most popular engravers. It is a story of violent change, radical politics, lost ways of life, and the beauty of the wild—a journey to the beginning of our lasting obsession with the natural world.

 “A refined and engaging biography, as beautifully wrought, in its way, as Bewick’s woodcuts.”—New York Times

“Uglow’s clear prose sparkles like Bewick’s River Tyne.”—Los Angeles Times

“This is a lovely book, not just in the quality and sympathy of the writing but in the care of its design and illustration. [Uglow] has turned a rich but undramatic life into a vignette as full of interest and details as one of Bewick’s own woodcuts.”—Sunday Telegraph

 

“A splendid biography. But it becomes an endearing one by the scattered presence of so many of Bewick’s woodcuts.”—Washington Post

 

“Another triumph for England’s most innovative biographer, and a marvelous treat for fans of Bewick’s beguiling work.”—Kirkus Reviews

 

  • This book is lavishly decorated by Bewick's works, with such a quality that it can serve as a little Bewick anthology. In fact the quality of printing is better than the Dover edition of his works (which you can get at Amazon), and this collection of his vignettes that I also own (Scolar Press, 1978). It's worth the money just for the illustrations. By saying this I'm not depreciating the text. Mrs Uglow certainly writes gracefully. But bear in mind that Bewick was a honest, though quick-tempered, craftsman. His life was not that eventful. There're no scandals to expose (well, Bewick actually ripped off his clients, when he felt like to). As a result, the book is at best lively, but not exciting. Chances are that you won't finish it in one sitting, especially when you're not particularly interested in 18th-century England. But get it anyway, if you care about art history at all.

  • I'd seen Thos. Bewick's illustrations for years in NY Review of Books and elsewhere; they'd always seemed to me mysterious for their silent detail and concentration. So it was quite refreshing to find out that he was a loud, warm, confident man. He spent his life and career firmly rooted in one place, so unlike myself and many others of us in this "globalized" age. He devoted his career to appreciating the minutiae of life all around him, and innovated new techniques for portraying them. These circumstances, together with the author's calm, clear and often bemused style of writing, create a very cozy experience -- almost like reading a non-fiction fairy tale. I read most of this book in small bites of a chapter or two over the course of a couple of weeks of evenings, and found it a wonderful escape from the pressures of the day.

    Though the book is very well-researched and surprisingly long (nearly 400 pages), it never drags. I'd been pretty ignorant about late 18th-early 19th Century English history other than a few names and dates, so it was also interesting to learn about the grass-roots resentment of government policies and wars, the government's tendency to turn dissidents into political prisoners, and much other historical context. But this learning is conveyed with a light touch. The illustrations are not only wonderful, they're as numerous as raisins in a cake, yet placed with great taste. A very outstanding book.

  • Uglow did a great service to Bewick, those who like his work, and those being introduced to him with this well written warm biography. While I hoped she might have discussed the book trade a bit more, I know that would have taken us a bit far from the man.

  • a particularly good book

  • This is a very well written informative biography of the influential wood engraver Thomas Bewick. The author places Bewick and his artistic contribution in the context of his times describing the artist's rise to success at the beginning of England's industrial age and during it's wartime eras with France and America. Uglow is passionate about the artist and his work and the book is beautfully illustrated with well chosen examples of Bewick's phenomenal tiny woodcuts. His work has endured for 2 centuries and this book helps you understand why.

  • I appreciate the years of hard work that authors put into their books. Their mountain of effort allows me to learn more about their subject through a few hours or days of careful reading. However, some books are greater gifts than others. Jenny Uglow has given me two of my very favorite reading experiences. Her "Hogarth" was a revelation to me. She opened up Hogarth's world and provided such a rich context for his life that my understanding of his time and context made his life and work much more meaningful.

    With this book, on the life, work, and world of Thomas Bewick, I experienced that delight again. I took my time savoring this book and examining the beautiful reproductions of his work with a magnifying glass (since my eyes can no longer pick up all the detail). Frankly, I had never heard of Thomas Bewick and wanted to read the book because it is by such a wonderful author. He was an engraver who specialized in engraving in boxwood. Again, a subject I knew only in the barest outline.

    Bewick was from an established but not wealthy family in the Tyne valley in northern England. He apprenticed as an engraver and demonstrated talent enough to found a shop with a partner. His work goes beyond the usual artisanship of wood engraving into a realm of artistry that sets him apart into a world that is still shocks in the effect and composition. This wonderful book provides a large number of his works in their actual size. Boxwood was used because of its hardness and ability to stand up to the number of prints commercial reproduction of the time required. However, the wood was small in diameter and the pieces tend to be small.

    Yet, they demonstrate a full range of emotion. Bewick is able to capture the images of his time and the countryside he loved. There are pieces that are quite funny and make a point such as the man driving his cow across the river to avoid paying the toll at the bridge, but losing his hat that was more costly than the toll would have been. He also shows us the drama of storms, shipwrecks, and all kinds of vignettes from life.

    However, his masterworks consumed more than twenty years of his life. The first was his Quadrupeds, which provided wonderful images and interesting text on animals both domestic and exotic. He then produced two magnificent works. The first volume was on the Land Birds of Britain and the second on the Water Birds of Britain. His presentation of the birds transcends mere illustration and were used and loved by naturalists for many decades. Even the great Audubon paid homage to Bewick's achievements. I find their beauty still has the power to stun and invite long and close examination.

    Uglow provides what is known about his life, his apprenticeship and those who apprenticed with him (a list is provided in the back). We learn about his business dealings, his lack of skill in handling money, but his generous spirit with friends. His somewhat prickly nature also caused strife and ongoing difficulties that were needless and destructive. Yet, the work remains. And we are all enriched from Bewick's rich talents and Uglow's masterful and magical writing.

    You owe yourself a trip through Bewick's life with Jenny Uglow as your guide. It will be an experience you will treasure.

    Reviewed by Craig Matteson, Ann Arbor, MI

    Here is Uglow's magnificent biography of Hogarth:
    Hogarth: A Life and a World