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ePub Augustine of Hippo: A Biography (New Edition, with an Epilogue) download

by Peter Brown

ePub Augustine of Hippo: A Biography (New Edition, with an Epilogue) download
Author:
Peter Brown
ISBN13:
978-0520227576
ISBN:
0520227573
Language:
Publisher:
University of California Press; New Ed edition (August 7, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1996 kb
Fb2 file:
1584 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
886

Augustine of Hippo by Peter Brown, originally published in 1967 and updated in 2000, is a comprehensive look at the . Although Augustine of Hippo would not be considered an all-inclusive biography it certainly has its place in the historical study of Augustine.

Augustine of Hippo by Peter Brown, originally published in 1967 and updated in 2000, is a comprehensive look at the life of the Bishop of Hippo, Saint Augustine, and perhaps even more importantly, an exhaustive study of the life of a North African from .

I salute Brown's achievement in bringing Augustine out of the tomb of theological doctrine, and setting his mind and emotions working before our eyes. -Richard Southern, New Statesman.

by Peter Brown (Author). I salute Brown's achievement in bringing Augustine out of the tomb of theological doctrine, and setting his mind and emotions working before our eyes. Justly applauded for its intelligence, and for the skill with which it relates the life and thought of a man dead for more than 1,500 years to the life we live no. -Frank Kermode, The Observer. He has attained to the true stature of his subject. -Owen Chadwick, Catholic Herald.

Augustine of Hippo: a biography Peter Robert Lamont Brown Visualizzazione frammento - 1967. Parole e frasi comuni. Informazioni bibliografiche.

Brown's reflections on the significance of these exciting new documents are contained in two chapters of a substantial Epilogue . Author(s) :Peter Brown (2000)

Brown's reflections on the significance of these exciting new documents are contained in two chapters of a substantial Epilogue to his biography (the text of which is unaltered). A personal as well as a scholarly fascination infuse the booklength epilogue and notes that Brown has added to his acclaimed portrait of the bishop of Hippo. Author(s) :Peter Brown (2000).

Augustine of Hippo book. This quote is from Brown’s recent epilogue; again a similar case where the argument is completely lacking. Peter Brown is the undisputed master of classical antiquity and this book clearly shows i. . Lo and behold, Augustine, the great promoter of predestination, hastened to apply this antidote to élitism he had found in Paul’s Letters!

Making of America series (Arcadia Publishing, 2004), 17−18. "Santa Monica Sculpture". Retrieved March 14, 2011. Patricia McGerr (1964), My Brothers, Remember Monica: A Novel of the Mother of Augustine, New York: P. J. Kenedy. Smither, Howard E. (1977-01-01). A History of the Oratorio.

Conversion: The Old and the New in Religion from Alexander the Great to Augustine of Hippo (reprint Brown Classics in Judaica, 1988). 707 Kb. Augustine of Hippo: Philosopher, Exegete and Theologian: A Second Collection of Essays.

These circumstantial texts have led Peter Brown to reconsider some of his judgments on Augustine, both .

These circumstantial texts have led Peter Brown to reconsider some of his judgments on Augustine, both as the author of the Confessions and as the elderly bishop preaching and writing in the last years of Roman rule in north Africa. Brown's reflections on the significance of these exciting new documents are contained in two chapters of a substantial Epilogue to his biography (the text of which is unaltered).

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This classic biography was first published thirty years ago and has since established itself as the standard account of Saint Augustine's life and teaching. The remarkable discovery recently of a considerable number of letters and sermons by Augustine has thrown fresh light on the first and last decades of his experience as a bishop. These circumstantial texts have led Peter Brown to reconsider some of his judgments on Augustine, both as the author of the Confessions and as the elderly bishop preaching and writing in the last years of Roman rule in north Africa. Brown's reflections on the significance of these exciting new documents are contained in two chapters of a substantial Epilogue to his biography (the text of which is unaltered). He also reviews the changes in scholarship about Augustine since the 1960s. A personal as well as a scholarly fascination infuse the book-length epilogue and notes that Brown has added to his acclaimed portrait of the bishop of Hippo.
  • There's an interesting aspect of this book.

    After it was written additional writings by Augustine were discovered which were the Divjak letters (1975) and the Dolbeau sermons (1990). Author Peter Brown updated his original book by adding a 2-chapter epilogue where he talks about how his book would have been affected if he had had those additional writings. The epilogue is like Brown's review and critique of his own book.

    Brown's book follows the same pattern as an Augustine biography written by Possidius who knew Augustine personally. Possidius focused mainly on the many controversies Augustine became embroiled in which include:

    Manachees - cult Augie belonged to before his famous conversion
    Donatists - felt they were the true Christian Church
    Caelestians
    pagans
    Jews
    Pelagius - pagan / Stoic
    Porphyry
    Julian of Eclanum
    assorted heretics

    I lost track of what exactly Augie didn't agree with some of those people about if Brown even did explain it.

    Because of this emphasis on controversy Brown's book portrays Augustine as a very stern, authoritative figure who, like Moses on Mount Sinai, was constantly on the verge of casting the stone tablets down on humanity. And that is not a totally inaccurate picture.

    However in the epilogue Brown feels he placed too much emphasis on those philosophical controversies. He feels he should have included the non sensational aspects of Augie's life as a dedicated priest and bishop.

    Brown's updated view based on the discovered writings is that Augustine was often a voice of moderation compared to some of his contemporaries such as Jerome and Ambrose.

    Augustine believed in and lived what he preached about. The rules for his monastery were based on how the apostles lived as indicated by the Acts Of The Apostles in the bible.

    Augustine was almost assassinated by a Circumcellion hit squad. The Circumcellions were the resistance branch of the Donatists. Fortunately Augie's guide took a wrong turn. Augustine was instrumental in causing the Roman government to turn against the Donatists and many of them committed suicide.

    Author Henry Chadwick felt that Brown's book is 'biography without the theology'. Brown feels this is a fair assessment. I agree also because while Brown mentions many philosophical systems such as neo Platonism he doesn't delve into them in any detail. Nor does he discuss Augustine's theology in detail. But then again doing that might have made this large book twice as long.

    Chadwick wrote his own Augustine biography which I haven't read but which apparently includes the theology all in 119 pages.

    Another of Brown's conclusions is Augustine himself may have become a little narrow minded and he could have done a better job of merging his Christian ideas with his neo Platonic views. Author Hilary Armstrong shares this view. Whether I would agree I don't know since I haven't read any books about Plotinus.

    However Augustine didn't have the luxury to just sit and meditate and write books all the time.

    Augustine was a key figure in establishing some of the basic tenets of Catholicism. But to understand exactly how he did this would I think require reading some more books about him. Augustine may have done this not so much by what he said and wrote but rather by how he lived.

    Augustine, Ambrose, Jerome, and Pope Gregory I are called the four 'great' doctors of the Western Church.

    This is a serious book. It's not something someone is going to read in one night.

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  • Talk about wanting to know Augustine! This book (in my opinion) offers so much information into the life of Augustine, but it not only reads as a biography but it also takes you into Augustine's inner thoughts, life, motivations, etc. When I was looking around for a book to know Augustine, I didn't find a book that was as thorough nor one that had as many good reviews as this one book did. I would have to say that the reviews were all right. The only thing that I found challenging were the many words that I had to look up in the dictionary, but hey that's also a plus because now I know more words! So take in mind that this book was originally written in the 1960's, so of course, the language is a bit more complex but still worth the effort.

  • Augustine of Hippo by Peter Brown, originally published in 1967 and updated in 2000, is a comprehensive look at the life of the Bishop of Hippo, Saint Augustine, and perhaps even more importantly, an exhaustive study of the life of a North African from A.D. 354 to A.D. 431. Brown, in 1967, at the age of 32, before the information age gave birth to Google and superficial research methods, penned a research giant on Augustine. Although the scholastic study of Augustine continued to advance after the first printing in 1967, Brown's work on Augustine still remains a benchmark for Augustinian study today and an edifying place to start for those interested in a study of Augustine.

    In this highly annotated book, Brown moves chronologically through Augustine's life, from birth to death, and spares no detail along the way. Brown moves from Augustine's recounting sin as a child by stealing pears from a fruit tree, which haunted him throughout his life, to contemplation and prayer at the end of his life on two hundred and thirty plus books Augustine would organize before his death. Augustine of Hippo is broken up into five large sections or transitions of Augustine's life with chronological tables preceding each section.
    Through each chapter Brown knits together a mix of Augustine's personal timeline of life's major events while never divorcing the history of the Roman Empire, and more specifically, that of 4th and 5th century life in North Africa. Though Brown is never quick to call Augustine out when he is wrong, even when he is obviously wrong, he prods the reader with objective truths until one starts to desire a deeper knowledge of Augustine than even Brown can deliver in 1967.

    Augustine, seen as a gifted child by his parents and basically raised by his Catholic mother Monica, was well educated (in Latin but not Greek) in the philosophy of his day, and as such, spent a good portion of his early life concentrating on Manichaeism and then Platonism. He would eventually carry a Neo-Platonist Christian worldview into his Bishopric and be influenced by some of their ideals throughout the remainder of his life. One of Augustine's life-long struggles that Brown accentuates is that of the flesh. Against his mother's wishes, Augustine took a concubine, whom he cared for deeply. He eventually set her aside for a traditional, pre-arranged, first class marriage, which he eventually declined anyway. Augustine ends up leaving for Italy, without telling Monica who was to travel with him, to continue his study in Rhetoric. After years of philosophical struggle, at the age of 33, Augustine begged Ambrose to wash away his sins in baptism, and in April of A.D. 387 he was baptized.

    From birth leading up to his Christian conversion, Augustine did not live a "Holy" life, as did other Christian philosophers turned Bishop. Once converted though, Augustine spent much of his life writing and preaching long sermons to fight heresies, most of which he was intimately familiar with himself. Here, Brown chronicles in great detail not only Augustine's conversion and perhaps his greatest literary output of Confessions, but also his shift from free-will philosophy of Manichaeism, through his epic fight with the Donatist's, and on to his final battle with original sin and baptism against Pelagius. Brown's use of primary Latin sources here is exhaustive, and sometimes confusing, but he gives these heresy battles in Augustine's life incredible detail by using Augustine's own words from his sermons, letters, and books. Brown's use of secondary sources throughout the text is even larger in number and his seventeen- page bibliography is a historical gift to future Augustinian study.

    One of the more interesting aspects of the text comes from the updated 2000 publication being reviewed here. As explained in an amended preface, Brown did not seek to write an updated edition to his 1967 publication. Instead, Brown viewed his original writing as a historical reference point in itself, written at a point in time in Augustinian study, and one to be kept historically in tact. As with any scholastic research, time moves on and new discoveries are made, as was the case with Augustine. To accommodate for new discoveries made since 1967 Brown added a two-section epilogue outlining such evidences as the 1975 discovery of the Divjak letters and the 1990 findings of the Dolbeau sermon manuscripts. If a reader has any prior knowledge of Augustine the suggestion might be made to read the epilogue first to be able to compare and contrast Brown's findings from 1967 with the more recent evidence.

    To conclude the reading of Augustine of Hippo is to begin an Augustinian study. Although Augustine of Hippo would not be considered an all-inclusive biography it certainly has its place in the historical study of Augustine. For one studying the life of Saint Augustine this biography is essential tool, and Brown has provided an important piece into the historical study of possibly the greatest theologian in history.