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ePub Rome and a Villa download

by William Weaver,Eleanor Clark

ePub Rome and a Villa download
Author:
William Weaver,Eleanor Clark
ISBN13:
978-1883642518
ISBN:
1883642515
Language:
Publisher:
Zoland Books (February 5, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1694 kb
Fb2 file:
1871 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt doc lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
813

In 1947 a young american woman named Eleanor Clark went to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship to write a novel.

In 1947 a young american woman named Eleanor Clark went to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship to write a novel. But Rome had its way with her, the novel was abandoned, and what followed was not a novel but a series of sketches of Roman life, most written between 1948 and 1951.

Eleanor Clark, Rome and a Villa (2000). Weaver wrote an introduction for this travelogue/memoir by Clark, whom he knew in Rome in the late 1940s). An Interview with William Weaver", by Martha King.

Rome and a Villa book. Illustrations throughout.

This item:Rome and a Villa (. Her book is lyrical but informative, and for some readers, perhaps too heavy with information, but I have found it indispensible both while in Rome and later back in the US thinking about where I had been. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Orignally published as separate articles in The New Yorker magazine, each chapter focuses on a particular subject.

Illustrations throughout. Результаты поиска по книге.

Republished in a beautiful new package, the eternal classic that captures the Eternal City in all its vibrant enchantment. Bringing to life the legendary city's beauty and magic in all its many facets, Eleanor Clark's masterful collection of vignettes, Rome and a Villa, has transported readers for generations. In 1947 the young American writer traveled to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship. But instead of a novel, Clark created a series of sketches of Roman life written mostly between 1948 and 1951.

Nonfiction; Steerforth Press, 2000). In 1947, five years before she was to marry Robert Penn Warren, the young American writer Eleanor Clark traveled to Rome on a Guggenheim Fellowship, and for the next four years she worked on a series of essays about the city that were gathered in the 1952 collection Rome and a Villa.

Rome and a Villa - eBook. Book Format: Choose an option. Once in Rome, the foreign writer or artist, over the course of weeks, months, or years, begins to lose ambition, to lose a sense of urgency, to lose even a sense of self.

IN 1947 A YOUNG AMERICAN woman named Eleanor Clark went to Rome on a Guggenheim fellowship to write a novel. But Rome had its way with her, the novel was abandoned, and what followed was not a novel but a series of sketches of Roman life written mostly between 1948 and 1951. This new edition of the essential classic Rome and a Villa includes an evocative introduction by the preeminent translator William Weaver, who was close friends with the author and often wandered the city with her during the years she was working on the book. Once in Rome, the foreign writer or artist, over the course of weeks, months, or years, begins to lose ambition, to lose a sense of urgency, to lose even a sense of self. What once seemed all-consuming is swallowed up by Rome itself; by the pace of life, by the fatalism of the Roman people, to whom everything and nothing matters, by the sheer historic weight and scale of the place. Rome is life itself - messy, random, anarchic, comical one moment, tragic the next, and above all, seductive.Clark pays special attention to Roman art and architecture. In the book's midsection she looks at Hadrian's Villa - an enormous, unfinished palace - as a meta-phor for the city itself: decaying, imperial, shabby, but capable of inducing an overwhelming dreaminess in its visitors. The book's final chapter, written for an updated edition in 1974, is a lovely portrait of the so-called Protestant cemetery where both Keats and Shelley are buried, along with other foreign notables.
  • "You walk close to your dreams"--that's the first sentence of Eleanor Clark's chapter on the fountains of Rome. Her book is lyrical but informative, and for some readers, perhaps too heavy with information, but I have found it indispensible both while in Rome and later back in the US thinking about where I had been. Orignally published as separate articles in The New Yorker magazine, each chapter focuses on a particular subject. One of my favorites is the section on Protestant Cemetery (actually the cemetery of the non-Catholics), where Keats, Shelley, Gramsci and many other non-Catholic writers, politicians, diplomats, and artists are buried. This is not a typical guidebook, however, and anyone who buys it in order to get maps, pictures, and restaurant tips will be disappointed. Nevertheless, it is an excellent guide to the city--it is thoughtful, it is full of strong opinions, and it is sometimes very funny, too. Eleanor Clark was married to the writer Robert Penn Warren, whose career overshadowed hers. Those who know his work but do not know the work of Clark may be surprised to find out just how good she is.

  • If you love Rome and haven't read this one yet, by all means do...it's smart and witty and full of information. Ranks up there with Guide to Rome by Georgina Masson.

  • I have been going to Rome for more than fifty years, speak and read Italian, and have many relatives there. Eleanor Clark's essays are by far the most evocative I know of in either English or Italian, and the last three in particular, on Hadrian's Villa, the Protestant Cemetery, and the poet G.G. Belli are deeply moving. Even for the reader has never been to Rome the literary value of these essays makes them extraordinarily rewarding.

  • those who love Rome... no one should visit the Protestant Cemetery without having read EC's pages on that wonderful place...

  • Dull.

  • Your service in getting it to me was good, but the content let me down. As I read much of her words, I kept thinking, "Who cares?"

  • I thought this book would be interesting because I love Rome....but it was so boring that I gave up before I reached the end. I am not sure why Ms. Clark wrote this book. I gave her one star for effort.

  • The best book ever written about Rome. For intelligent people who love the city, no other book can really compare for its insight, its thoughtfulness, and gorgeous writing. As reviews here make clear, the book is not for dumb people who want to reduce Italy to a foodie rom-com. In this respect the title of the book is now unfortunate. But if you're headed to Rome with your sketchbook or camera, Clark will make you see things you would never see otherwise.