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ePub Galla Placidia: The Last Roman Empress (Women in Antiquity) download

by Hagith Sivan

ePub Galla Placidia: The Last Roman Empress (Women in Antiquity) download
Author:
Hagith Sivan
ISBN13:
978-0195379129
ISBN:
0195379128
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (August 31, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1614 kb
Fb2 file:
1434 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
977

Galla Placidia was not the last empress of the Roman Empire, but the next to last.

Galla Placidia was not the last empress of the Roman Empire, but the next to last.

The astonishing career of Galla Placidia (c. 390-450) provides valuable reflections on the state of the Roman empire in the fifth century CE. In an age when emperors, like Galla's two brothers, Arcadius (395-408) and Honorius (395-423), and nephew, Theodosius II (408-450), hardly ever. In an age when emperors, like Galla's two brothers, Arcadius (395-408) and Honorius (395-423), and nephew, Theodosius II (408-450), hardly ever ventured beyond the fortified enclosure of their palaces, Galla spent years wandering across Italy, Gaul and Spain first as hostage in the camp of Alaric the Goth, and then as wife of Alaric's successor.

Other books in the series. Women in Antiquity (1 - 10 of 15 books). Books by Hagith Sivan.

Galla Placidia: The Last Roman Empress. Other books in the series. Books by Hagith Sivan

The astonishing career of Galla Placidia (c. In an age when emperors, like Galla's two brothers, Arcadius (395-408) and Honorius. In an age when emperors, like Galla's two brothers, Arcadius (395-408) and Honorius (395-423), and nephew, Theod.

It isn't Hagith Sivan's fault that this marvellous story is known only in. .Licinia outlived Galla by at least five years so she, not Galla, is "The Last Roman Empress".

It isn't Hagith Sivan's fault that this marvellous story is known only in sketchiest form and from meagre sources. She does her best to flesh it out by borrowing texts from 100 years earlier or later on the reasonable assumption that a woman of Galla's class and upbringing would receive praise or condemnation within the invariable limits of a woman's life: virginity, marriage, childbearing and - if she survived - blameless widowhood. What? The pope leading a Roman army? The index reveals another Boniface entirely, a Roman general. This general, as it happens, was one of Galla's champions.

Home Browse Books Book details, Galla Placidia: The Last Roman Empress. Galla Placidia: The Last Roman Empress. The astonishing career of Galla Placidia (c. In an age when emperors, like Galla's two brothers, Arcadius (395-408) and Honorius (395-423), and nephew, Theodosius II (408-450), hardly ever ventured beyond the fortified enclosure of their palaces, Galla spent years wandering across Italy, Gaul and Spain first as hostage in the camp of Alaric the Goth, and then as wife of Alaric's.

oceedings{Busch2013HagithSG, title {Hagith Sivan, Galla Placidia. 2011 Oxford University Press Oxford/New York/Auckland € 81,99}, author {Anja Busch}, year {2013} }. The Last Roman Empress. Oxford/New York/Auckland, Oxford University Press 2011 Sivan Hagith Galla Placidia.

Sivan, Hagith (2011), Galla Placidia: The Last Roman Empress, Oxford University Press. Salisbury, Joyce E. (2015), Rome's Christian Empress: Galla Placidia Rules at the Twilight of the Empire, Johns Hopkins University Press. Doyle, Chris (2017), Honorius: the Fight for the Roman West, Routledge.

Restored to Italy on the swords of the eastern Roman army, Galla watched the coronation of her son, age six, as the emperor of the western Roman provinces

Restored to Italy on the swords of the eastern Roman army, Galla watched the coronation of her son, age six, as the emperor of the western Roman provinces. For a dozen years (425-437) she acted as regent, treading uneasily between rival senatorial factions, ambitious church prelates, and charismatic military leaders. This new biography of Galla is organized according to her changing roles as bride, widow, bereaved mother, queen and empress.

Slightly disappointed in this book. I was expecting a detailed biography, but it was more about Galla Placidia's times than her life

Slightly disappointed in this book. I was expecting a detailed biography, but it was more about Galla Placidia's times than her life. The information was interesting and useful for my purposes, but I was hoping for more.

The astonishing career of Galla Placidia (c. 390-450) provides valuable reflections on the state of the Roman empire in the fifth century CE. In an age when emperors, like Galla's two brothers, Arcadius (395-408) and Honorius (395-423), and nephew, Theodosius II (408-450), hardly ever ventured beyond the fortified enclosure of their palaces, Galla spent years wandering across Italy, Gaul and Spain first as hostage in the camp of Alaric the Goth, and then as wife of Alaric's successor. In exile at the court of her nephew in Constantinople Galla observed how princesses wield power while vaunting piety. Restored to Italy on the swords of the eastern Roman army, Galla watched the coronation of her son, age six, as the emperor of the western Roman provinces. For a dozen years (425-437) she acted as regent, treading uneasily between rival senatorial factions, ambitious church prelates, and charismatic military leaders. This new biography of Galla is organized according to her changing roles as bride, widow, bereaved mother, queen and empress. It examines her relations with men in power, her achievements as a politician, her skills at establishing power bases and political alliances, and her efficiency at accomplishing her desired goals. Using all the available sources, documents, epigraphy, coinage and the visual arts, and Galla's own letters, Hagith Sivan reconstructs the turning points and highlights of Galla's odd progression from a bloodthirsty princess at Rome to a bride of a barbarian in Gaul, from a manipulative sister and wife of emperors at the imperial court at Ravenna to a beggar at the court of her relatives in Constantinople, and from a devious regent of the western Roman empire to a collaborator of popes in Rome.
  • Galla Placidia was not the last empress of the Roman Empire, but the next to last. The was well researched and well written, had interesting pictures and was about a unique character in history. How strong women can be and resilient to undergo travel, the language barrier and marriage to barbarians, handed around like a commodity for a sack of grain and emerge to produce three children and a enjoy a long life. We are able to visit the mausoleum and see the wonderful mosaics to this day. The Roman Empire was way ahead of everyone else and its remnants are everywhere.

  • Complete, unbiased, scholarly work. An interesting read that gives great depth to this facinating historical figure. The book encapsulates and updates Galla scholarship with credibility.

  • A book on Galla Placidia? I don't think anyone ever expected to see such a thing. Not even just one, either, though some of the others are historical novels and even one a romance novel I picked up by accident one day several years ago. This however is a thoroughly scholarly book by a professor of history from the University of Kansas. This is a rare time for Ancient History and biography. There are now numerous books coming out on the less covered areas of Roman and Greek history, almost a competition to see who will get a book next. Though they still come out, one could argue that there are enough books on the Late Republic and the Julio-Claudians and books on other periods and persons from Roman History are more than welcome. These can be scholarly or written for the general history-reading public with both approaches appreciated.

    This may have begun with Barbara Levick's "Julia Domna: Syrian Empress" in 2007 which showed that women of antiquity could be written about with enough research despite their being always placed in the distant background of ancient history. We now have a book about Pulcheria and the Theodosian women of the Eastern Court, contemporaries of Placidia. And it's not just women but the major generals and minor or less-covered emperors and even renewed interest in the Hellenistic kingdoms. Constantius II now has a book and even more surprising so does Maximinus Thrax, the gigantic Thracian wrestler-general who became emperor after the assassination of Alexander Severus. There's one I'll have to read;not only is it entirely unexpected but it's likely the closest to that book on Pupienus and Balbinus I always wanted to find. Who's Next? Herennius Etruscus? Diadumenian?

    The problem has always been the same: lack of source material. It's amazing how much exists for the Republic and how little for large stretches of the Empire, not just the Third Century Crisis but even for emperors like Antoninus Pius. New ways of researching history through inscriptions, coins, art, archaeology,and even scientific analysis of aerial photos and pollen counts have opened up new information for study without total reliance on senatorial historians. For a figure such as Galla Placidia the basic outlines of her life were known as well as a few surviving letters, but nothing to fill in the real person. I used to love telling friends about this essentially unknown woman of the late Roman Empire who had such an amazing life. Daughter of emperor Theodosius I, step-sister to two emperors, wife of Constantius II and mother of Valentinian III, who in 410 was abducted by the Goths during Alaric's siege of Rome and later married his brother Athaulf. Her life sounded like an impossible fantasy and showed an incredible will to survive.

    To write this work professor Sivan has used all available sources, though as usual for the period Orosius and Olympiodorus of Thebes figure heavily in the early years. The empty spaces are filled in with scholarly speculation, which is the best one can do. In this case it is carefully presented and explained. In the opening chapter on her wedding to Athaulf the Gothic king in Narbonne, she uses examples from typical wedding speeches of the era to explain what was likely in Galla's. The forms and rhetorical rules of the genre make this a valid method. Her many letters during her involvement in several religious controversies of the day illuminate her Theodosian commitment to orthodoxy and also her attempts to formalize the primacy of the Bishop of Rome over the entire empire (she was the first to call him Papa, the Pope) much to the disapproval of the Eastern Court in Constantinople. Professor Sivan does go out on a historian's limb, so to speak, making a claim that the Ashburnam Pentateuch (usually said to be 7th Century) was Galla's actual wedding gift for the marriage of Valentinian III and Linea Eudoxia.

    What comes through is a complex and flawed character, attributes which make her seem ever more real. She was valiant during the siege of Rome by Alaric, but pragmatic enough to marry his brother and become briefly Queen of the Goths. (There's a fascinating historical question here but unfortunately too long to go into concerning Athaulf's alleged speech). She was a successful regent for Valentinian when he was a child-emperor but was tricked by the wiles of her general, Aetius, and lost Africa as a result. She was devout and intensely religious but was involved in the death of her guardian, Serena in Rome; insisted on the execution of the magician, Libianus, who wanted to help Honorius and Constantius defeat the barbarians; and likely attended the hideous mutilation and death of the unrecognized emperor Joannes in the Hippodrome of Aquelia (his sin was not being related to the family).

    in books like these the content is not simply the title subject's biography but the Empire and its culture at the particular time being covered. Here we have the Western Empire in its final decades with not only invasions but the beginning of large chunks being converted into barbarian kingdoms. The ruling aristocracy is split between still mostly pagan senatorial families and a vehemently ascendant Christianity led by the Imperial (Theodosian) family itself who practiced extreme orthodoxy and tolerated no alternative ideas. This was a Rome where church fathers like St. Jerome admired aristocratic women like Melania the Younger or Paula, who gave up great wealth but now mourned, fasted, prayed and cried and were "squalid with dirt". Important clerics like Paulinus advised married couples to stay virgins and, if they couldn't to at least dedicate all theit children to chastity. This became all the rage among aristocratic women, especially at the court on Constantinople. One must remember, of course, that all believed the End-Times were near.

    Galla spent the last years of her life building churches including the famous one still standing in Ravenna with its mosaic of Galla herself.

  • This is the last in an - contrary to what is stated in one of the reviews above - ever-increasing series of scholarly books about Galla Placidia. By now there must be ten or twelve in print, in English, French, German and Italian.
    It is well-researched, but for any reader not already thoroughly well-versed in the period nearly incomprehensible. Moreover, almost every page is filled with speculative thoughts - about people who might have been present, texts that might have been read, words that might have been spoken. These, are supposedly introduced to make up for the fact that we really know very little about Galla Placidia. the effect, however, is that they feel like useless "padding". In short, it is a very "post-modern", almost novellistic way of writing history: intelligent, but not convincing. And; the portrait on the cover almost certainly is NOT hers.