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ePub Pedro Nunes (1502-1578): His Lost Algebra and Other Discoveries (American University Studies) download

by John R. C. Martyn

ePub Pedro Nunes (1502-1578): His Lost Algebra and Other Discoveries (American University Studies) download
Author:
John R. C. Martyn
ISBN13:
978-0820430607
ISBN:
0820430609
Language:
Publisher:
Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers (October 1, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1854 kb
Fb2 file:
1512 kb
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Rating:
4.7
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Pedro Nunes (): His Lost Algebra And Other Discoveries. by. John R. C. Martyn. Pedro Nunes played a major part in the discovery of the world by Portuguese mariners. In this book, his mathematical and scientific achievements are described, together with evidence on his life and friends arising from a collection of his Greek and Latin poems, and from religious notes he composed during his later years.

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Middle Ages and Renaissance. Pedro Nunes (1502–1578): His Lost Algebra and Other Discoveries. American University Studies, Ser. 9, 18. viii + 158 p. bibl. New York: Peter Lang, 1996.

In 1517, Nunes started his university studies in humanities, philosophy, and medicine at the University of Lisbon, and, by 1521/1522, he had gone to Salamanca to. .Martyn, John R. (1991). Pedro Nunes – Classical Poet. Euphrosyne 19: 231–270.

In 1517, Nunes started his university studies in humanities, philosophy, and medicine at the University of Lisbon, and, by 1521/1522, he had gone to Salamanca to study at the university there. In Salamanca Nunes married Dona Guiomar Aires in 1523, and they had six children (two boys and four girls). Nunes returned to Portugal in 1524/1525, and on 16 November he was named cosmographer of the kingdom. At that time he was Doctor of Medicine  .

Pedro Nunes (Portuguese: ; Latin: Petrus Nonius; 1502 – 11 August 1578) was a Portuguese mathematician, cosmographer, and professor, from a New Christian (of Jewish origin) family.

Pedro Nunes (Portuguese: ; Latin: Petrus Nonius; 1502 – 11 August 1578) was a Portuguese mathematician, cosmographer, and professor, from a New Christian (of Jewish origin) family

Isis 94 (2) (2003), 369-371. H Leitao, Sobre as Notas de Algebra atribuidas a Pedro Nunes, Euphrosyne 30 (2002), 407-416.

Isis 94 (2) (2003), 369-371. H Leitao, Para uma biografia de Pedro Nunes: O surgimento de um matemático, 1502-1542, Cadernos de Estudos Sefarditas 3 (2003), 45-82. Pedro Nunes (1502-1578): Mathematics, Cosmography and Nautical Science in the 16th century.

Pedro Nunes (1502–1578): His Lost Algebra and Other Discoveries by John R. Martyn (pp. 369-371). Groundbreaking Scientific Experiments, Inventions, and Discoveries of the Seventeenth Century by Michael Windelspecht (pp. 374-375).

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American university studies. Pedro Nunes played a major part in the discovery of the world by Portuguese mariners

Martyn, John R. ISBN: 9780820430607. Publication Information: New York : P. Lang, c1996. American university studies. Series IX, History, 0740-0462 ; vol. 182. Personal Subject: Nunes, Pedro, 1502-1578. An English version of his long-lost Portuguese algebra is included, as well as poems and letters by his friends translated into English for the first time.

Pedro Nunes played a major part in the discovery of the world by Portuguese mariners. In this book, his mathematical and scientific achievements are described, together with evidence on his life and friends arising from a collection of his Greek and Latin poems, and from religious notes he composed during his later years. An English version of his long-lost Portuguese algebra is included, as well as poems and letters by his friends translated into English for the first time. These discoveries came from a manuscript recently found in the municipal library of Évora, the perfectly preserved Renaissance city that in Nunes' day was the home of King John III.