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ePub Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion download

by Amy S. Wilensky

ePub Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion download
Author:
Amy S. Wilensky
ISBN13:
978-0767901857
ISBN:
0767901851
Language:
Publisher:
Broadway; First Printing edition (August 10, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1345 kb
Fb2 file:
1309 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr lrf txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
427

One more thing, I read another book by Amy Wilensky, another memior.

A powerful witness to her own dysfunction, Wilensky describes the strain it bore on her relationships with the people she thought she knew best: her family, her friends, and herself. One more thing, I read another book by Amy Wilensky, another memior. It's called "The Weight of It" and it's about Amy's sister's struggle with obesity. Reading the other book, I had no hint or clue that Amy herself lived with Tourrette's and OCD.

Passing for Normal book. A powerful witness to her own dysfunction, she describes the strain it bore on her relationships with the people she thought she knew best: her family, her friends, and her self.

It is a well-written, passionate memoir of a woman who has overcome tough odds to succeed where many others have failed, both professionally and as a person. a great accomplishment. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 19 years ago. This is a well-written, well-paced, interesting story by a woman who is clearly learning to master some of her own difficulties with OCD and Tourettes.

But for almost two decades, Amy Wilensky hid a bewildering array of physical and mental tics, as well as a compulsion to hoard and catalogue junk. Now she has written a moving memoir about a life spent 'passing for normal'. Tue 8 Aug 2000 1. 4 EDT First published on Tue 8 Aug 2000 1. 4 EDT.

Her fears and compulsions ranged from an irrational dread of odd numbers, to a love of multiples of six, from denying herself water to needing to touch wood.

item 1 Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion, Wilensky, Amy . Used; Good Book -Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion, Wilensky, Amy . Used; Good Book. item 2 Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion by Wilensky, Amy S. -Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion by Wilensky, Amy S. £. 8. Her fears and compulsions ranged from an irrational dread of odd numbers, to a love of multiples of six, from denying herself water to needing to touch wood.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. What I remember even more distinctly than the incidents of cruelty and confusion, intolerance and avoidance-more vividly than standing in front of the mirror watching my head move with no conscious instruction . . What I remember even more distinctly than the incidents of cruelty and confusion, intolerance and avoidance-more vividly than standing in front of the mirror watching my head move with no conscious instruction from me-is the strain of trying to conceal my tics and rituals from others, especially those closest to me, my own family most of al. he provocative memoir of a young woman's struggle to come to terms with a life plagued by irrational behavior.

Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780684866390 (978-0-684-86639-0) Softcover, Simon & Schuster Ltd, 2000. Learn More at LibraryThing. Amy S. Wilensky at LibraryThing.

But maybe I am not. For most of her life, these thoughts plagued Amy Wilensky as her mind lurched and veered in ways she didn't understand and her body did things she couldn't control.

Written by. Wilensky. Memoirs (19 items) list by sipa. Published 11 years, 9 months ago. View all Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion lists. View all Passing for Normal: A Memoir of Compulsion pictures. Manufacturer: Broadway Release date: 5 July 2000 ISBN-10 : 076790186X ISBN-13: 9780767901864. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed.

"What I remember even more distinctly than the incidents of cruelty and confusion, intolerance and avoidance--more vividly than standing in front of the mirror watching my head move with no conscious instruction from me--is the strain of trying to conceal my tics and rituals from others, especially those closest to me, my own family most of all."The provocative memoir of a young woman's struggle to come to terms with a life plagued by irrational behavior.I am crazy. But maybe I am not.  For most of her life, this thought haunted Amy Wilensky as she watched her body do things she couldn't control, repeatedly twitching and contorting into awkward positions. Her mind lurched and veered in ways she didn't understand: She felt that she must touch wood at all times to ward off harm, that chewing a wad of stale gum would prevent a plane crash. Why couldn't she throw away meaningless scraps of paper? Why were six-word sentences strangely satisfying?While Amy excelled in school and led an otherwise "normal" life, she worried that beneath the surface she was a freak, that there was something irrevocably wrong with her. It wasn't until she happened upon the book The Boy Who Couldn't Stop Washing after graduating from college that she realized she might be among the approximately 5 million Americans afflicted with Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder.Passing for Normal is Amy's emotionally charged account of her lifelong struggle with these often misunderstood disorders. A powerful witness to her own dysfunction, she describes the strain it bore on her relationships with the people she thought she knew best: her family, her friends, and her self. Confronting the labels we apply to ourselves and others--compulsive, crazy, out of control--Amy describes her symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment with courage and a healthy dose of humor, gradually coming to terms with the absurdities of a life beset by irrational behavior. This compelling narrative, by turns tragic and comic, broadly extends our understanding of the wondrously complex human mind, and, with subtlety and grace, challenges our notion of what it is to be "normal."
  • Really loved the author's narrative and writing style.

  • Very interesting book. A little repetitive but also informing. Makes you humble and remember to appreciate life. Good read and I suggest it!

  • Very good read with profound knowledge and memoirs of both diseases. I found the parental attacks on the characters as children very saddening.

  • This is a well written book. I do wish that the author would have added a few more chapters about her treatment though.

  • an interesting look into the life experience of an individual living with obsessive compulsive disorder and tourette's syndrome. good for those studying mental health, or not

  • Excellent service. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

  • This book is wonderful. I have Tourettes and Amy's honest look at her own struggles changed the way I look at myself. For one, she articulated things in ways that I never knew how to. I even asked my husband to read this book so he could better understand what I'm dealing with.
    Second, through reading this book I realized that I wasn't alone. Having such a rare disorder means that you have to kind of figured things out for yourself because there aren't a lot of people to share your experiences with. Reading Amy's book, I found so many shared experiences and even learned that some of my "idioms" were related to Tourettes and I had no idea!
    I learned so much about myself through Passing For Normal! If you have Tourettes, know someone who does, or just want to hear the story of someone who does, this is the book for you! You'll leave with a better understanding of what Tourettes I'd really like. Not just what Hollywood shows!

  • Amy Wilensky tells a powerful first-hand account of living with Tourette syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder.
    Amy Wilensky, at the age of 8 years old, began to have symptoms, first there was a tick; her head and neck would jerk. At first it was every once in a while, so Amy could conceal it sometimes. Then it started getting more intense, causing Amy pain in the form of headaches and a permanently stiff neck, and it became increasingly difficult to hide from anyone. When her father noticed the tics, he was angry. The worst was at mealtime. He would watch her like a sniper and would explode when there was even the slightest movement of her head or neck. He would say "you're head's going to fall off if you don't cut that out!" Things got worse for Amy. Her mind lurched and veered in ways she didn't understand; Amy felt that she must touch wood at all times to ward off harm, and that chewing a wad of stale gum would prevent a plane crash. She would save meaningless scraps of paper, and there were many other occurrences that made Amy feel that she was crazy.
    I believe that anyone can understand Amy's feelings at having a disease that was undiagnosed for years and what it makes you think of yourself and how it effects your whole life. I was so inspired by the amazing account of Amy's difficult life, and how she was able to make it to where she is today.
    A very courageous story.