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ePub Churchill: A Biography download

by Roy Jenkins

ePub Churchill: A Biography download
Author:
Roy Jenkins
ISBN13:
978-0374123543
ISBN:
0374123543
Language:
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus, Giroux; 1st edition (November 15, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1813 kb
Fb2 file:
1320 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr txt lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
617

From Roy Jenkins's masterly biography, we emerge marveling at the manifold gifts that informed Churchill's . Roy Jenkins was the author of 18 books, including Gladstone, which won the Whitbread Prize for Biography.

From Roy Jenkins's masterly biography, we emerge marveling at the manifold gifts that informed Churchill's genius for leadership. Jenkins proves equal to the daunting scale of his subject.

Roy Jenkins was the author of many books, including Churchill and Gladstone, which won the Whitbread Prize for Biography. Active in British politics for half a century, he entered the House of Commons in 1948 and subsequently served as Minister of Aviation, Home Secretary, and Chancellor of the Exchequer; he was also the President of the European Commission and Chancellor of Oxford University.

Roy Jenkins was a Labor MP in the House of Commons at the time Churchill was himself still in the house. Jenkins began his career there in 1948, just prior to the second time Churchill became Prime Minister in 1951. Churchill at this point in his life was not quite the force he once was up to and during his first term as Prime Minister from 1940-45, but to see the great orator himself in person still must have been quite extraordinary.

Roy Jenkins' biography of Winston Churchill looks intimidating: clocking in at over 900 pages, and with no breaks contained within chapters, it is a serious read. Fortunately, its subject is one of the most well-known and largest characters of the 20th century

Roy Jenkins' biography of Winston Churchill looks intimidating: clocking in at over 900 pages, and with no breaks contained within chapters, it is a serious read. Fortunately, its subject is one of the most well-known and largest characters of the 20th century

Churchill: A Biography. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 15 нояб.

Churchill: A Biography. From a very young age, Churchill believed he was destined to play a great role in the life of his nation, and he determined to prepare himself.

Jenkins wrote 19 books, including a biography of Gladstone (1995), which won the 1995 Whitbread Award for Biography, and a much-acclaimed biography of Winston Churchill (2001). His then-designated official biographer, Andrew Adonis, was to have finished the Churchill biography had Jenkins not survived the heart surgery he underwent towards the end of its writing.

Should the biography show Churchill in a favourable light, had you rather it were critical, or hostile, or impartial? I have read a number of biographies: Martin Gilbert’s one volume tome; Roy Jenkins’s book; Young Titan b. .

Should the biography show Churchill in a favourable light, had you rather it were critical, or hostile, or impartial? I have read a number of biographies: Martin Gilbert’s one volume tome; Roy Jenkins’s book; Young Titan by.In May 1960 Winston Churchill wrote to his son: "My dear Randolph, I have reflected carefully on what you said. I think that your biography of Derby is a remarkable work, and I should be happy that you should write my official biography when the time comes (more)Loading.

Churchill Roy Jenkins Macmillan £30, pp1002. Writers, like generals, need luck. To publish a new book about one of Britain's greatest war leaders in the week of the Anglo-American assault on Afghanistan is an outrageous display of synchronicity

Churchill Roy Jenkins Macmillan £30, pp1002. To publish a new book about one of Britain's greatest war leaders in the week of the Anglo-American assault on Afghanistan is an outrageous display of synchronicity. Beyond that, moreover, Lord Jenkins, born in 1920, is doubly suited as Winston Churchill's latest biographer. First, he grew to political maturity during the twilight of a great age of British parliamentary democracy.

Acclaimed historian Roy Jenkins presents a comprehensive biography of Winston Churchill, an icon of modern history, from his childhood to the critical World War II period and beyond-a New York Times bestseller. It will be a brave, not to say foolhardy, author who attempts to write another life of Churchill for at least a decade, perhaps longer. -Andrew Roberts, Sunday Telegraph.

A brilliant new life of Britain's greatest modern prime ministerWinston Churchill is an icon of modern history, but even though he was at the forefront of the political scene for almost sixty years, he might be remembered only as a minor player in the drama of British government had it not been for World War II. In this magesterial book, Roy Jenkin's unparalleled command of the political history of Britain and his own high-level experience combine in a narrative account of Churchill's astounding career that is unmatched in its shrewd insights, its unforgettable anecdotes, the clarity of its overarching themes, and the author's nuanced appreciation of his extraordinary subject.From a very young age, Churchill believed he was destined to play a great role in the life of his nation, and he determined to prepare himself. Jenkins shows in fascinating detail how Churchill educated himself for greatness, how he worked out his livelihood (writing) as well as his professional life (politics), how he situated himself at every major site or moment in British imperial and governmental life. His parliamentary career was like no other - with its changes of allegiance (from the Conservative to the Liberal and back to the Conservative Party), its troughs and humiliations, its triumphs and peaks - and for decades almost no one besides his wife discerned the greatness to come. Jenkins effortlessly evokes the spirit of Westminster through all these decades, especially the crisis years of the late 1930s and the terrifying 1940s, when at last it was clear how vital Churchill was to the very survival of England. He evaluates Churchill's other accomplishments, his writings, with equal authority.Exceptional in its breadth of knowledge and distinguished in its stylish wit and penetrating intelligence, this is one of the finest political biographies of our time.
  • Is there any more fascinating figure than Winston Churchill? I have found him interesting since I read a children's book on him back in 1972 and continue to find him interesting to this very day. There are many books to come out on Churchill. The definative work was begun by Randolph Churchill and continued after his death by Martin Gilbert. This runs several volumes and includes lengthy extracts from Churchill's papers. There is also a one volume abrigement which Gilbert has written. Others have taken up the task of writing the life of the most significant British statesman of the 20th century and these are as a whole a mixed bag. However, despite the vast number of books Roy Jenkins book stands apart from many others.
    The main reason is that Jenkins is a former British politician. When he writes about Parliament, he does so with authority as he has walked the same halls as Churchill and has held many of the same positions. Although he was Labor and Churchill Conservative/Liberal/Conservative, Jenkins is able to lay aside party rancor and write a kind of "Churchill without tears." Jenkins saw himself as a moderate member of the Labor Party and left it in the early 80s in reaction to the extremely radical views of the Michael Foot era.
    The essential truths about Churchill as Jenkins sees them are personality driven. For although Churchill was a great man, many of the elements that served him well during the second World War, his tenacity, eloquence, and belief in his destiny did not always suit all environments. Traits that were useful standing up against Hitler were not as useful in planning the Dardanelles campaign. There is an object lesson here which Jenkins devotes some attention to.
    Other than his book on Churchill, Jenkins has also written books on Asquith (PM during part of the First World War) and Gladstone (Prime Minister during Churchill's father's time). It probably is good that he wrote these works first as they prepared him to produce what amounts to a masterpiece of Churchillian scholarship.

  • Roy Jenkins was a Labor MP in the House of Commons at the time Churchill was himself still in the house. Jenkins began his career there in 1948, just prior to the second time Churchill became Prime Minister in 1951. [Churchill died at 90 years old in 1965.] Churchill at this point in his life was not quite the force he once was up to and during his first term as Prime Minister from 1940-45, but to see the great orator himself in person still must have been quite extraordinary. Jenkins admits in his book that they didn't really know one another, and they were on opposite sides of the House, as Churchill was a Conservative.

    I just completed a trip called "Churchill's England" with the Churchill Centre based in Washington, D.C. and as preparation for this trip; I wanted to immerse myself in Churchill history in order to recognize the people we were to meet and the places we were to see.

    [...]

    I searched Amazon for what would be a single volume to begin to read just prior to the trip and take along with me to read on the journey. I chose this one because Roy Jenkins has an amazing first paragraph:

    "Churchill's provenance was aristocratic, indeed ducal, and some have seen this as the most important key to his whole career. That is unconvincing. Churchill was far too many faceted, idiosyncratic and unpredictable a character to allow himself to be imprisoned by the circumstances of his birth."

    That was it, I was hooked; I found Jenkins style very appealing.

    As it turns out, the other definitive single-volume biography was by Sir Martin Gilbert, whom I didn't realize was Churchill's official biographer, knew Lady Churchill, worked for their son Randolph in the 1960's, and has written numerous volumes on Churchill.

    Jenkins book is well worth reading, though I found it a bit of a difficult because of the British English used. His style and prose and very well thought through and he is obviously quite knowledgeable on his subject. I did find it interesting how he refers to Martin Gilbert's work on a number of occasions. This is most certainly a political biography, so for one who is interested in the strategy and tactics that Churchill used, during his political career, in his rise to become one of the most prominent international statesmen of the 20th century, then this Jenkins biography is worth the effort.