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by Shiba Goro,Ishimitsu Mahita,Teruko Craig

ePub Remembering Aizu: The Testament of Shiba Goro download
Author:
Shiba Goro,Ishimitsu Mahita,Teruko Craig
ISBN13:
978-0824821579
ISBN:
0824821572
Language:
Publisher:
University of Hawaii Press; 1st American Edition edition (August 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1714 kb
Fb2 file:
1735 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
832

Shiba Goro was born into an Aizu samurai family in 1859. Remembering Aizu tells of Shiba's earlier years. It is an extraordinary story that provides insights and material for a social history of the Restoration and its aftermath.

Shiba Goro was born into an Aizu samurai family in 1859. He was just ten years old at the time of the attack, which claimed most of his family. In the cruel world of exile, he lived with his father on the edge of starvation, struggling to survive. Eventually making his way to Tokyo, he became a servant, and though born in an enemy domain, gained entrance to a military school of the new regime.

Gorô Shiba, son of an upper class samurai family, lost his mother, grandmother and 2 sisters during the punitive war against Aizu province. His father and 3 brothers survived, but they were separated, though they managed to keep close ties

Gorô Shiba, son of an upper class samurai family, lost his mother, grandmother and 2 sisters during the punitive war against Aizu province. His father and 3 brothers survived, but they were separated, though they managed to keep close ties. He lived from the ages of 10 to 15 as an underpaid servant. In the cruel world of exile, he lived with his father on the edge of starvation, struggling to survive

Shiba Goro was born into an Aizu samurai family in 1859. Eventually making his way to Tokyo, he became a servant, and though born in an enemy domain, gained entrance to a military school of the new regime

Remembering Aizu: The Testament of Shiba Gorō. Translated, with introduction and notes by Teruko Craig. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1999.

Remembering Aizu: The Testament of Shiba Gorō. By using this service, you agree that you will only keep articles for personal use, and will not openly distribute them via Dropbox, Google Drive or other file sharing services. Please confirm that you accept the terms of use. Cancel.

Teruko Craig (Translation). Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

Shiba, Gorō; Ishimitsu, Mahita; Craig, Teruko. Remembering Aizu: The Testament of Shiba Goro. University of Hawaii Press. Noguchi Shinichi, Aizu-han. Tokyo: Gendai Shokan, 2005.

Remembering Aizu: The Testament of Shiba Goro. Anne Walthall, Shiba Goro, Ishimitsu Mahito, Teruko Craig. Remembering Aizu tells of Goro shiba's early years. It provides and extraordinary story that provides insights and material for a social history of the Restoration and its aftermath.

Goro Shiba, Goreo Shiba, Shiba Goro. The Meiji Restoration of 1868 is most often seen as a glorious event marking the overthrow of Tokugawa feudalism and the beginning of Japan's modern transformation. Yet it had its dark side

Goro Shiba, Goreo Shiba, Shiba Goro. Yet it had its dark side. The Aizu domain in northeastern Japan had staunchly supported the old regime. For this it was attacked by the new government's forces from Choshu and Satsuma in the autumn of 1868. Its castle town was burned to the ground, and during a month-long siege, whole families perished. After defeat, the domain was abolished and its samurai population exiled to barren.

Find sources: "Shiba Gorō" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (April 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this . Ishimitsu, Mahito (2000). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

Find sources: "Shiba Gorō" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (April 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). June 21, 1860 Aizuwakamatsu, Mutsu Province, Japan. National Diet Library. Portraits of Modern Historical Figures.

The Meiji Restoration of 1868 is most often seen as a glorious event marking the overthrow of Tokugawa feudalism and the beginning of Japan's modern transformation. Yet it had its dark side. The Aizu domain in northeastern Japan had staunchly supported the old regime. For this it was attacked by the new government's forces from Choshu and Satsuma in the autumn of 1868. Its castle town was burned to the ground, and during a month-long siege, whole families perished. After defeat, the domain was abolished and its samurai population exiled to barren terrain in the far north.

Shiba Goro was born into an Aizu samurai family in 1859. He was just ten years old at the time of the attack, which claimed most of his family. In the cruel world of exile, he lived with his father on the edge of starvation, struggling to survive. Eventually making his way to Tokyo, he became a servant, and though born in an enemy domain, gained entrance to a military school of the new regime. Shiba's abilities were recognized, and he rose through the officer ranks to become a full general - a singular distinction for an Aizu samurai in an army dominated by former samurai of the Choshu domain.

Remembering Aizu tells of Shiba's earlier years. It is an extraordinary story that provides insights and material for a social history of the Restoration and its aftermath. But above all, it is a vividly rendered personal account of courage and determination, loss and remembrance.

  • This is a fairly short book, which I found fascinating. There is a very useful introduction which gives the historical context and details on Shiba's family. The memoir takes place during the early years of the Meiji era, when Japan was undergoing an upheaval and transformation from a feudal state to a modern country.

    Gorô Shiba, son of an upper class samurai family, lost his mother, grandmother and 2 sisters during the punitive war against Aizu province. His father and 3 brothers survived, but they were separated, though they managed to keep close ties. He lived from the ages of 10 to 15 as an underpaid servant. At 15 he was accepted into a military school, and his fortunes took a better turn. He eventually retired as a general. This memoirs covers his life from about 8 to 16. It is simply but well told, and often quite moving. It offers a glimpse into Japanese life in those turbulent times not well known in the West.

    I highly recommend it.

  • excellent memoir on the fall of the aizu samurai clan

  • This work was a required read for a course on Japanese history course, and provides an interesting perspective for cultural studies through time.

  • purchased for a class