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ePub Soldier of Fortune: Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl download

by Douglas V. Meed

ePub Soldier of Fortune: Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl download
Author:
Douglas V. Meed
ISBN13:
978-1931823050
ISBN:
1931823057
Language:
Publisher:
Halcyon Pr Ltd; First Edition edition (March 1, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1565 kb
Fb2 file:
1553 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
909

MEXICAN WAR, 1846-1848.

MEXICAN WAR, 1846-1848. He served as a foreign service officer with the . Information Agency during the Cold War. Douglas V. Meed lived in El Paso, Texas for many years.

Book DescriptionSOLDIER OF FORTUNE traces the bold and adventurous career of Emil Holmdahl, one of. .Holmdahl?s adventures in Mexico shed new light on revolutionary activities and the struggle for power, including the death of revolutionary leader Francisco "Pancho" Villa.

Book DescriptionSOLDIER OF FORTUNE traces the bold and adventurous career of Emil Holmdahl, one of that swashbuckling breed of mercenaries growing out of the United States? imperialistic years during the early twentieth century.

Soldier of Fortune book. After serving with Pancho Villa in the Mexican Revolution, Holmdahl s SOLDIER OF FORTUNE recounts the true life adventures of swashbuckling soldier-of-fortune Emil Holmdahl. Holmdahl fought his way through numerous wars such as the Philippine Insurrection, the Central American 'Banana Wars', The Mexican Revolution, World War I, and numerous other scrapes and misadventures.

Emil Lewis Holmdahl (August 26, 1883 – April 8, 1963) was a machine gunner, soldier of fortune, spy, gun runner, and treasure hunter who fought under John J. Pershing in the Spanish–American War in the Philippines, under Lee Christmas in Central Amer. Pershing in the Spanish–American War in the Philippines, under Lee Christmas in Central America, under Francisco Madero, Pancho Villa, and Venustiano Carranza in the Mexican Revolution, and under John J. Pershing in World War I. In 1926, Holmdahl was accused of having stolen Francisco Pancho Villa's head.

Holmdahl headed north into Mexico and was a Captain in dictator Porfirio Diaz's Rurales under General Kosterlisky, the "Russian Cossack". Holmdahl fought under Francisco Madero in 1910 after Madero defeated President Diaz and became a Major in the Madero army. Soldier of Fortune: Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl, Douglas V. Meed Halcyon Press Lt. 2003. com/books?id 4Oiz8 NjGQIC&q Robertson.

Soldier of Fortune traces the bold and adventurous career of Emil Holmdahl, one of that swashbuckling breed of mercenaries growing out of the United States' imperialistic years during the early twentieth century.

LibraryThing members' description. No descriptions found. Library descriptions.

Emil Lewis Holmdahl was a machine gunner, soldier of fortune, spy, gun runner, and treasure hunter who fought under John J. Pershing in the Spanish–American War in the Philippines, under Lee Christmas in Central America, under Francisco Madero, Pancho Villa, and Venustiano. In 1926, Holmdahl was accused of. having stolen Francisco Pancho Villa's head. Soldier of Fortune (SOF), The Journal of Professional Adventurers, is a monthly .

Soldier of Fortune - Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl, by Douglas V. Meed at American Buddha Online Library. The Purcell Chronicles: The Great War: John J. Pershing - The Iron General. 1914 photograph of Pancho Villa, and General Black Jack Pershing, in El Paso, Texas. Ancient Ruins Ancient Artifacts Ancient Mysteries Ancient History Mystery Of History Art History Aztec Calendar Inka Before Us. Mexican President Porfirio Díaz standing next to the Aztec Sun Stone.

Books about Holmdahl: Soldier of Fortune: Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl by Douglas .

Books about Holmdahl: Soldier of Fortune: Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl by Douglas V. Meed (Mar 1, 2003). Holmdahl: Webster's Timeline History, 1811 - 2007 by Icon Group International (May 17, 2010). Behind the scenes, (Discovery books, ed. by John Hampden and Freda Holmdahl) by John Sommerfield (1934). Martin H:son Holmdahl.

SOLDIER OF FORTUNE traces the bold and adventurous career of Emil Holmdahl, one of that swashbuckling breed of mercenaries growing out of the United States’ imperialistic years during the early twentieth century.

Following Holmdahl from the Philippine Insurrection, through the "banana wars" in Central America, onto the bloody stage of the Mexican Revolution and World War I, Douglas Meed captures the drama and adventure not only of Holmdahl, but of the United States’ quest to become a major world power.

Holmdahl’s adventures in Mexico shed new light on revolutionary activities and the struggle for power, including the death of revolutionary leader Francisco "Pancho" Villa. Meed suggests that Holmdahl may have been the man who opened Villa’s grave, cut off his head, and sold it to a Mexican general.

SOLDIER OF FORTUNE is a fascinating account of a bygone age, and forms a distinctive addition to the annals of the American Southwest.

  • What promised to be a great inside story about the career of American mercenary Emil Holmdahl proved to be a fairly thin survey study of Holmdahl, filled in here and there with interesting vignettes from the careers of other prominent American soldiers of fortune of that day.

    While Meed cites his exclusive access to Holmdahl's private papers, those records were apparently mighty thin, for the author repeatedly offers conjecture about Holmdahl's various whereabouts and actions, rather than offering definitive evidence. After awhile it becomes tedious to read phrases such as "Holmdahl likely was there.'

    Additionally, is it just my imagination, or did not entire paragraphs from Meed's chapter on the Phillipine Insurrection appear VERBATIM in Edward S. "Tex" O'Reilly's 1936 autobiography, "Born To Raise Hell" co-authored by Lowell Thomas and published fully sixty-seven years before Meed wrote this book with no attribution to Tex O'Reilley?

    From this one can draw his or her own conclusions about the author's level of scholarship.

  • Great seller -- Book content is only medium.

  • Soldier of Fortune--Adventuring in Latin America and Mexico with Emil Lewis Holmdahl.

    My main interest in the book is research on Aimee Semple McPherson. As interesting as I find military matters, devouring great volumes in my misspent youth on some obscure troop movement on the Eastern front; they now tend to blur into guys doing and worrying about the same thing, regardless of nationality. There are a few surprises still. However, the section devoted to McPherson is exceedingly small, I have skimmed the other parts of the book, and while it contains considerable detail on other matters, I do not pretend to evaluate its contents for accuracy or readability or narrative cohesion.

    The section which most intrigued me was a June 29, 1926, El Paso Herald newspaper article about Holmdahl.

    "When the reporter asked if Holmdahl had been involved in the
    alleged kidnapping of famous California evangelist Aimee Semple
    McPherson, he enigmatically replied, "Well, maybe I did and maybe
    I didn't." "

    The author adds this qualifier, taking Holmdahl's claim off the table:

    "He didn't. McPherson's kidnapping was a farce. She faked
    the dramatic story of her abduction and escape from Mexico to
    cover up a sexual tryst with a member of her flock. "

    Author Douglas V. Meed did not even get the gossip right. It was not a member of her flock but a former employee; An inconsequential difference perhaps.

    There are a number of sources for Meed to evaluate, among them:

    Cox, Raymond L. The Verdict is In, 1983,
    Daniel Mark Epstein, 1994 " Sister Aimee: The Life of Aimee Semple McPherson,"
    and "Aimee Semple McPherson Everybody's Sister" by Edith L Blumhofer, 1993.

    But what is interesting is that Meed emphatically states as a fact, McPherson's kidnapping was a cover up. Three courts, in 1926, again in 1929 and yet another one in 1990, though the latter had no legal authority, which looked at the work of the previous two and declared they "did not have any substantial evidence to show that her story was untrue."

    If hundreds of reporters, investigations by numerous agencies over several years with the equivalent of 6+ million spent in 2013 dollars, the largest case of its kind in California, and STILL they could not prove her story false, then by what proof is Meed using to claim McPherson faked her kidnapping?

    With Meed offering no evidence to back up his statement, it would seem that Emil Lewis Holmdahl's possible claim about McPherson's kidnapping is back on the table.

    One of the ransom notes sent to the Angelus Temple in May of 1926 asked for $500,000, which was about 6.4 million in 2013 dollars. McPherson, while in captivity, told the three kidnappers the Temple would not, could not pay that much. An outrageous sum when other kidnappers of the era were asking for $25,000 to $50,000, ($300,000 to $650,000 in US 2013 funds). The sum was so large, so outrageous either the kidnappers were amateurs with unrealistic expectations, or possibly using the event to finance some simmering scheme going on in Mexico at the time. Ransoms from kidnapping fund conflicts in the present era and with Holmdahl's possible claim, might have been a motivation in 1926, though most of the revolutions were behind them; Holmdahl was involved in others including possibly but not proven, Pancho Villa's missing head.

    For Holmdahl to make a straight admission of involvement in the McPherson kidnapping was dangerous, alleged kidnappers were being sought in July, 1926. Even later admission of it, if investigated could constitute serious prison time. Why did he not simply deny it if he was not involved? One has to read the book and decide regarding Holmdahl's character. In this instance, an ambiguous reply for Holmdahl, if involved, was a prudent strategy.

    Two stars
    I did learn something about Emil Lewis Holmdahl and the feud-wars before and in between the two "biggies," of which I knew little of before.