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ePub The Beautiful and the Damned: A Portrait of the New India download

by Siddhartha Deb

ePub The Beautiful and the Damned: A Portrait of the New India download
Author:
Siddhartha Deb
ISBN13:
978-0865478732
ISBN:
0865478732
Language:
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (September 18, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1843 kb
Fb2 file:
1796 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi lrf lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
875

The jacket of Siddhartha Deb's new book is worth studying.

The jacket of Siddhartha Deb's new book is worth studying. It has a simple design, the title blazoned in large white letters across a photograph, the subtitle (A Portrait of the New India in the proof copy; Life in the New India in the finished version) proclaimed in smaller letters below. The eye shifts focus, and the letters blur; the woman in the photograph occupies your attention. This look is also one of the commonest faces of contemporary India: not affluence, but a simulation of affluence, which makes the face seem paradoxically humane.

The author, Siddhartha Deb, himself an Indian, left India in the early 2000s to study in America, and he wrote this book on his .

The author, Siddhartha Deb, himself an Indian, left India in the early 2000s to study in America, and he wrote this book on his return. Let me give a brief overview of the chapters. He attempts to describe both the glitter of the new high rises, malls, call centers, and the various business schools that produce the tech employees to work in these places.

Siddhartha Deb is a marvelous participatory journalist, a keen observer of contemporary India. In The Beautiful and the Damned he dives head-first into the places where change is happening, temporarily inhabiting these evolving, often confusing sub-worlds, talking to those benefiting from (and victimized by) said changes, and explaining in prose both highly personal and sociologically insightful how India's people and culture are coping. Much like fellow participatory journalist George Orwell.

In India: A Portrait, Patrick French demonstrated enormous energy and purpose, but . Shrewdly, Siddhartha Deb’s The Beautiful and the Damned avoids reaching for this category altogether and is very much the finer book for it.

In India: A Portrait, Patrick French demonstrated enormous energy and purpose, but the sprawl of his territory ultimately vanquished him. He tidily potted India’s untidy history, and his reporting felt like hit-and-run conversations - and yet India came away with a girth of over 400 pages, busy and insufficient at the same time.

Siddhartha Deb (Bengali: সিদ্ধাৰ্থ দেব) (born 1970) is an Indian author who was born in Meghalaya and grew . His first non-fiction book, The Beautiful And the Damned: A Portrait of the New India was published in June 2011 by Viking Penguin.

Siddhartha Deb (Bengali: সিদ্ধাৰ্থ দেব) (born 1970) is an Indian author who was born in Meghalaya and grew up in Shillong in northeastern India.

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Siddhartha Deb, who teaches creative writing at the New School, is the author of two novels: The Point of Return, which was a 2003 New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and An Outline of the Republic

Siddhartha Deb, who teaches creative writing at the New School, is the author of two novels: The Point of Return, which was a 2003 New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and An Outline of the Republic.

Siddhartha Deb is the author most recently of The Beautiful and the Damned: A Portrait of the New India. India’s Chilling Lesson for the Left. Narendra Modi has been reelected. In part, that's because Indian leftists, like American leftists, have been trying to imitate right-wingers rather than countering them. By Siddhartha Deb. May 28, 2019. What Dave Eggers misses in his story of a Yemeni-American man’s rise. April 4, 2018. The Rise of the Global Novelist. How to read fiction from around the world in an age of xenophobic populism. April 25, 2017. The New Face of India Is the Anti-Gandhi.

Siddhartha Deb grew up in a remote town in the northeastern hills of India and . Deb's experience interviewing the call-center staff led him to undertake this book and travel throughout the subcontinent

Siddhartha Deb grew up in a remote town in the northeastern hills of India and made his way to the United States via a fellowship at Columbia. Six years after leaving home, he returned as an undercover reporter for The Guardian, working at a call center in Delhi in 2004, a time when globalization was fast proceeding and Thomas L. Friedman declared the world flat. Deb's experience interviewing the call-center staff led him to undertake this book and travel throughout the subcontinent.

Deb's experience interviewing the call-center staff led him to undertake this book and travel throughout the subcontinent. The Beautiful and the Damned examines India's many contradictions through various individual and extraordinary perspectives. The Beautiful and the Damned examines India's many contradictions through various individual and extraordinary perspectives

Siddhartha Deb grew up in a remote town in the northeastern hills of India and made his way to the United States via a fellowship at Columbia. Six years after leaving home, he returned as an undercover reporter for The Guardian, working at a call center in Delhi in 2004, a time when globalization was fast proceeding and Thomas L. Friedman declared the world flat. Deb's experience interviewing the call-center staff led him to undertake this book and travel throughout the subcontinent.

The Beautiful and the Damned examines India's many contradictions through various individual and extraordinary perspectives. With lyrical and commanding prose, Deb introduces the reader to an unforgettable group of Indians, including a Gatsby-like mogul in Delhi whose hobby is producing big-budget gangster films that no one sees; a wiry, dusty farmer named Gopeti whose village is plagued by suicides and was the epicenter of a riot; and a sad-eyed waitress named Esther who has set aside her dual degrees in biochemistry and botany to serve Coca-Cola to arms dealers at an upscale hotel called Shangri La.

Like no other writer, Deb humanizes the post-globalization experience―its advantages, failures, and absurdities. India is a country where you take a nap and someone has stolen your job, where you buy a BMW but still have to idle for cows crossing your path. A personal, narrative work of journalism and cultural analysis in the same vein as Adrian Nicole LeBlanc's Random Family and V. S. Naipaul's India series, The Beautiful and the Damned is an important and incisive new work.

The Beautiful and the Damned is a Publishers Weekly Best Nonfiction title for 2011.

  • “The Beautiful and the Damned” by Siddhartha Deb, who grew up in India, lives in the US, wrote the book right here on a Radcliffe fellowship, and often returns to “the new” India. He wrote two novels and has the story-telling ability of a novelist, but these stories are real: He spent four years recently being with and interviewing people in India about their lives and work: business entrepreneurs, software engineers, farmers, migratory factory workers, and women in service jobs (likely a page turner for you---their lives). I really think it tells the story of all humanity today, with all people’s hardships, hopes, differences, partial triumphs, and disappointments. And with it the poignant West-East confusions.
    And for students:
    This book is NOT a novel. It is an account of real life, based on four years of connecting and spending much time with real people, not fictional. But Deb can tell a story, so his accounts are very readable, like you’re “right there”. And yes, he does interlard his journalistic dialogue with personal and even political impressions, but there is nothing “texty” about the book---it’s more like a movie. But I’ve had a lot of experience in different parts of the world with different kinds of people, and with some understanding of regimes. So this book fleshes out the globally typical circumstances and lives of representative people of different classes, especially those who are mobile: classwise, culturally, and geographically. In other words, yes, it directly illustrates “conflicts in India” as well as “reflecting on problems worldwide”. I would recommend it as an “on the ground” companion reading for texts you may have been assigned.

  • This book provides good insight into the economic transformation in India during the last two decades. While the IT boom and outsourcing has provided opportunities to many, life remains hard for the majority. The author shares the stories of five people illustrating the divide among the newly wealthy, the burgeoning middle class, and the continuing plight of the village farmer and the poor. I appreciate that the book is a narrative and does not judge or imply a conclusion on any of the people sharing their stories. At times I found the writing hard to follow due to word choice and was thankful for the dictionary feature on my Kindle.

  • Deb criscrosses across India and sheds light on the people and events that you never hear about in the mainstream media. Importantly, he tales the time to get to know people, their background and the environments they live in. A must read for someone interested in taking a deeper look into “India Shining!”

  • This is a remarkable book. It takes the reader through five narratives of contemporary India, painting a vivid portrait of a country in transition. I'm really impressed with the clarity with which Deb accomplishes this and would rate this book as far more informative (and written in much better prose) than any other book about the ongoing socioeconomic transformation in India. It's not nostalgic, it doesn't romanticize the country or pay tribute to any specific cities: it focuses on the people (an impressive variety of them), not the places or the practices.

    (Perhaps this was not the author's intent, but if you're planning to do business in India, or have been assigned to travel there on work, read the first two essays, they give you a good idea of the rich tapestry of Indian aspirations. While I grew up in India, I have lived in the United states for over 15 years, and although I travel to India every couple of months for work, it is hard to see the range of what this book tells you even if you are a frequent visitor.)

    The nod to F. Scott Fitzgerald goes beyond his choice of title: the first narrative draws explicit parallels between Arindam Chaudhari and Gatsby, the nouveau rich outsider with a questionable academic past. But Deb is not simply more readable than Fitzgerald, he also rises to the challenge of describing a far more complex society, and one that is going through fairly radical change. It is hard to peg this book as being of a specific "type". There's a mix of relevant history and astute social observation, and a good range of context. Perhaps it is a very readable ethnography, one that anyone interested in India should read. I couldn't put it down once I started it. Then I read it again.

    postscript: I discovered earlier this week while in India that the version being sold there does not contain the first chapter "The Great Gatsby", which has been removed following a civil case filed by Chaudhuri's IIPM. (It was published in the magazine "Caravan" back in February 2011.

  • Found this has so much information that clarified my recent stay in India. I stayed with a family and was puzzled by some of the cultural differences and I have been to India eleven times but never staying in a family home.

  • Reading it. So far: read it. Great portrait of India and lots of humour.

  • I'd have rated it a full 5 stars but I felt it ended a little abruptly. I liked the structure and the flow of the narrative. It was pretty well thought out and sounded neutral rather than biased.
    I'd say, read this to get an idea of the underbelly of the great Indian growth story

  • Deb is a keen observer. His writing is crisp. The book reads more like a fast paced novel. The first chapter on Arindam itself is worth the price