mostraligabue
» » Alexander of Russia: Napoleon's Conqueror

ePub Alexander of Russia: Napoleon's Conqueror download

by Henri Troyat

ePub Alexander of Russia: Napoleon's Conqueror download
Author:
Henri Troyat
ISBN13:
978-0880640596
ISBN:
0880640596
Language:
Publisher:
Fromm Intl (April 1, 1986)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1253 kb
Fb2 file:
1562 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf lrf lit
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
425

Alexander of Russia book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Alexander of Russia: Napoleon's Conqueror as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Alexander of Russia book.

broad-brush narrative restores to center stage important personalities and their interplay in the politics . Publishers Weekly "Troyat's biography of Alexander.

Publishers Weekly "Troyat's biography of Alexander. turns out to be more enthralling than most of the novels I've read lately. Pamela Marsh, The Christian Science Monitor.

Henri Troyat was a Russian born author who was schooled and resided in France for most of his life. The same characteristics that give Alexander of Russia its poignant readability are also its historical difficulties. He is the author of numerous books and novels including several biographies on notable Russian historical figures. His 1980 biography on Alexander I of Russia, originally entitled Alexandre I: Le Sphinx du Nord, was translated by Joan Pinkham and published in 1982. Troyat’s flair for novelistic writing causes him to write quite speculatively.

Henri Troyat, Joan Pinkham. In Paris and London, the crowds hailed him as the man who had conquered Napoleon, as the liberator of Europe, and as a benevolent, enlightened monarch. At home he came to be feared as a reactionary, oppressive autocrat in a country where millions of serfs were still treated as little more than personal property.

Meanwhile, reform was postponed. Troyat has a lively writing style that holds the interests of the reader all way to the end of the book.

In the Early 19th century Alexander was rivaled only Napoleon in terms of esteem yet today men like the Prussian general Blucher Furst von Metternich and lord Wellington seem to get far more recognition in our modern histories. Meanwhile, reform was postponed.

Alexander of Russia: Napoleon's Conqueror. Page 36. ^ Konstantin Akinsha, Grigorij Kozlov, Sylvia Hochfield. The Holy Place: Architecture, Ideology, and History in Russia. Yale University Press, 2007. Download as PDF. Printable version.

Main Author: Troyat, Henri, 1911-. Northeastern Illinois University. Location: Book Shelves. Call Number: DK191 T76131982. Check if item can be requested.

Troyat's smirks and shrugs, half-inappropriate in a biographer of Catherine the Great (1980), are wholly inappropriate to dealing with her grandson Alexander I. The abiding questions of Alexander's life-his sincerity as a reformer, his capabilities as a commander, his turn to religious devotion-are. The abiding questions of Alexander's life-his sincerity as a reformer, his capabilities as a commander, his turn to religious devotion-are quashed by treating him from the outset as a dissimulator, ""a weak reed,"" an oscillator, an opportunist.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Alexander of Russia : Napoleon's Conqueror by. .

Discusses the life and times of Czar Alexander I of Russia, who was hailed as the enlightened liberator of Europe but who was feared at home as a harsh, repressive autocrat
  • This book paints Alexander as a multifaceted personality, which he showed himself to be. The author had a lot of documentation to support his views on Alexander's personality and what drove him to the actions her did. When Alexander ascended the Russian throne as a result of his father's murder, he had that to battle (he had been led to believe that his father would not be murdered but merely deposed) and he had Napoleon to deal with. Alexander was only 25 years old. Like Nicholas, he looked at the French revolution with horror because of the bloodbath that it produced, but still had at least a soft spot for liberalism. Alexander was raised more in the liberal manner due to the influence of his Grandmother, Catherine II. His father, Paul I, hated that. So Alexander was pulled between two worlds - the liberalism of Catherine II and the militarism of his father, Paul I. This conflict was with him all of his life. By the time Alexander had succeeded in defeating Napoleon, he was more than ready for some peace and quiet, much like we are when a disaster happens. This pursuit of peace and quiet led him to put Russia in the hands of some of the most reactionary forces while granting the Poles a constitution. He also entertained the though of retiring and handing the throne to his younger brother, Nicholas. Constantine, the brother next in line, refused the crown every time it was offered to him. In the end, Alexander was worn down and died in 1825, maybe of a flu type virus or something similar in the Crimea. Just about thirty years again. Old in his middle 50's. What a revelation!

  • Henri Troyat was a Russian born author who was schooled and resided in France for most of his life. He is the author of numerous books and novels including several biographies on notable Russian historical figures. His 1980 biography on Alexander I of Russia, originally entitled Alexandre I: Le Sphinx du Nord, was translated by Joan Pinkham and published in 1982. The work includes a bibliography sectioned into primary and secondary sources, a chronology of events in Alexander’s life paralleled with corresponding world events, one picture of Alexander I, and one map of the Western Russian Empire circa 1815.

    Taking in account the difficulty in attempting a biography on any historical figure, an author must carefully select his or her sources in order to craft narrative educational, accurate, entertaining, and with purpose. As a novelist, as well as an historian, Troyat beautifully presents his narrative in an enthralling fashion that keeps his reader interested. With a clearly recurring theme, it becomes evident that Troyat’s purpose is to present Alexander I as a confused and enigmatic leader. Alexander is shown torn between a strong belief in liberty while ruling the most autocratic nation in Europe. Troyat has his main character portrayed in a similar light to classic heroes of antiquity, who are destined for great success followed by tragedy. Even if the reader is aware of the ending, they will find themselves turning each page hopeful Alexander’s rule will be a triumph of all he wished for from his youth.

    As a historian Troyat relies heavily on the memoirs and letters of the major characters. This includes Catherine the Great, Alexander’s wife Elizabeth, and Metternich of Austria. There is hardly any page that is lacking a direct quote from these and other primary sources. Though a few letters are attributed to Alexander I, the vast majority of Troyat’s portrayal of the Tsar is crafted from how others viewed him. Troyat’s notation style leaves much to be desired, as surprisingly few of those quotes are properly cited; while this creates a readability to keep his reader enthralled, it also makes it difficult for any serious student to verify and find where and in what context these quotes were said and/or written. In the translator’s acknowledgments, Joan reminds the reader that these quotes were from a dated language, and in many cases were written deliberately ambiguous. That fact causes this reviewer to question some of Troyat’s interpretations, as he seems to take certain poetic liberties from those quotes to craft his vision of Alexander as a leader unsure of exactly how to lead, and doubtful in his own abilities.

    The biography flows well as we grow with Alexander in each stage of his life. We are introduced to a young Alexander who grew up taught to idealize knowledge and liberties of the French culture, this coming from memories of his teacher and Grandmother Catherine II. His father, an authoritative militarist, provides different qualities to his son, illustrating the issues that future Tsar would have to reconcile during his reign. Troyat takes the reader along with Alexander to Tilsit and Erfurt and gives personality to both Alexander and Napoleon. After the invasion into Russia by France, the march to Paris happens quickly. This stage of Alexander’s life becomes a turning point as the rest of Troyat’s biography shows Alexander dealing with the end of the war and what he is to do next, mostly on a personal level.

    The same characteristics that give Alexander of Russia its poignant readability are also its historical difficulties. Troyat’s flair for novelistic writing causes him to write quite speculatively. While it is understood that historians must reconstruct a narrative to the best of their ability and some poetic license is inevitable in a biography, Troyat’s confident speculations leave almost no room for any other views or interpretations. Opposing views are not often given, and if they are it is only to illustrate Alexander’s inability to be a decisive leader and highlight his ambiguous nature. Even when Troyat shows Alexander in a decisive manor, as in his dedication to his military communes, it’s for the purpose to illustrate his inability it reconcile his liberal upbringing and authoritative empire.

    Besides Alexander of Russia’s splendid readability, its greatest strength comes from Troyat’s ability to personalize Alexander. Alexander is not presented as a larger-than-life figure, but instead as a character extremely relatable to for the reader. This allows the reader to be taken on a journey with Alexander, to get inside his head, feel what he feels, and ask: what would I do?
    “As on every occasion when fate dealt him a blow, the ghost of his father came back to haunt his memory…Even his victory over Napoleon, which should have earned him the indestructible gratitude of his subjects, had, in a way turned against him. No matter what he did, he was not understood, not loved by his people” (Troyat 280).
    However, focusing mostly on Alexander’s personal feelings and struggles, Troyat gives little attention is given to his policies. Arguably the defining moment in Alexander’s reign, the patriotic war, is discussed in little detail and presented in only a handful of pages. While twice as much time is spent discussing his personal issues relating to his Holy Alliance and obsession with mystical and secret societies. In the end we are left with a view of Alexander as a truly confused individual, bordering on weak willed and extremely indecisive. A view that does not coincide well with other biographical accounts this reviewer has been exposed to.

    The resulting biography is an extremely readable, entertaining, and a thought-provoking account of the sphinx of the North. It will cause a more serious student to question or rethink their personal opinion of the Tsar and his personal struggles. It also provides a decent introduction for an amateur or undergraduate student interested in learning more about the personality of Napoleon’s conquer; this may be the best function of the book.

  • This was a great addition to my library that consists of so many of the great Russian authors and the history of Russia that I have been reading
    about for 30+ years. So much to read to 'fill in the dots' so to speak. Like my other books all are a real 'treasure' to have and learn from with
    ever greater understanding ! CDW

  • I have read every one of Henri Troyat's biographies. I love how he creates a very personal portrait of a character, which really helps you understand why the characters do what they did. This book reads like a novel, and is hard to put down. Highly recommended!

  • Am currently reading this; a chapter at a time. I find it interesting but it's not as exiting as other Czarist bio's I've read. Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great were more interesting. Overall it's not a bad book and worth the money. Will certainly finish it.