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ePub Katherine the Queen: The Remarkable Life of Katherine Parr, the Last Wife of Henry VIII download

by Linda Porter

ePub Katherine the Queen: The Remarkable Life of Katherine Parr, the Last Wife of Henry VIII download
Author:
Linda Porter
ISBN13:
978-0312384388
ISBN:
0312384386
Language:
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press; 1St Edition edition (November 23, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1326 kb
Fb2 file:
1196 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr azw lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
950

Katherine the Queen book.

Katherine the Queen book. The book covers the years 1512-1548. It charts Katherine's early life, her marriages and early widow hood, her subsequent remarriage to an ageing and irascible Henry, and finally her indulgent marriage to Thomas Seymour, a man she truly loved, Historically accurate without being too stuffy, this is a fascinating glance at the life of the surviving queen.

The book covers : The early life of Katherine Parr, Her two previous marriages (I had not heard much about the first before reading this book) How she made her way into Court life and how Henry decided to make her his sixth wife

The book covers : The early life of Katherine Parr, Her two previous marriages (I had not heard much about the first before reading this book) How she made her way into Court life and how Henry decided to make her his sixth wife. Her relationship with Henry's three children and her own step-daughter from her second marriage (another fact that had not registered in my head before) How she narrowly missed being another statistic for murdered Queens of England. Her life after Henry's death. Life with Thomas Seymour and the kerfuffle with Princess Elizabeth and Thomas Seymour.

Читайте Katherine the Queen (автор: Linda Porter) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Читайте книги и аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. The general perception of Katherine Parr is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England because the king needed a nurse as his health declined. Yet the real Katherine Parr was attractive, passionate, ambitious, and highly intelligent.

The general perception of Katherine Parr, the sixth and last wife of Henry VIII, is that she was a. .In the various studies of the six wives of Henry VIII she receives much less attention than Katherine of Aragon or Anne Boleyn.

The general perception of Katherine Parr, the sixth and last wife of Henry VIII, is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England because the king needed a matronly consort to nurse him as his health declined. Her main achievement, in the famous rhyme about Henry’s six wives, is that she 'survived'

Katherine was queen of England and attended as such. William Parr had deserted Warwick by that time

Katherine was queen of England and attended as such. Even if some thought her days as Henry’s wife would soon be past, nothing was said. Only to the women of her immediate family, her sister and cousin, could she give vent to her dissatisfaction and frustration. William Parr had deserted Warwick by that time. In March, when Edward returned to reclaim his throne, the eldest Parr brother met him at Nottingham with 600 of his own men ‘well arrayed and habled for war’. It must have been a difficult decision to break with the Nevilles, and the anxiety that he might have miscalculated stayed with William Parr until Warwick was dead.

Электронная книга "Katherine the Queen: The Remarkable Life of Katherine Parr, the Last Wife of Henry VIII", Linda Porter. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст,. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Katherine the Queen: The Remarkable Life of Katherine Parr, the Last Wife of Henry VIII" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The general perception of Katherine Parr is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England because the king needed a nurse as his health declined

The general perception of Katherine Parr is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England because the king needed a nurse as his health declined. Thirty-years-old (younger than Anne Boleyn had been) when she married the king, she was twice widowed and held hostage by the northern rebels during the great uprising of 1536-37 known as the Pilgrimage of Grace. Her life had been dramatic even before she became queen and it would remain so after Henry's death.

Her life had been dramatic even before she became queen and it would . A good biography of Henry VIII's last wife.

Her life had been dramatic even before she became queen and it would remain so after Henry's death. She hastily and secretly married her old flame, the rakish Sir Thomas Seymour, and died shortly after giving birth to her only child in September 1548. What I appreciated about this book was the depiction of Katherine's early years and first two marriages, before she became the wife of a king.

The general perception of Katherine Parr is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England . Yet the real Katherine Parr was attractive, passionate, ambitious, and highly intelligent

The general perception of Katherine Parr is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England because the king needed a nurse as his health declined. Yet the real Katherine Parr was attractive, passionate, ambitio. Thirty years old (younger than Anne Boleyn had been) when she married the king, she was twice widowed and held hostage by the northern rebels during the great uprising of 1536–37 known as the Pilgrimage of Grace. Her life had been dramatic even before she became queen and it would remain so after Henry’s death.

The general perception of Katherine Parr is that she was a provincial nobody with intellectual pretensions who became queen of England because the king needed a nurse as his health declined. Yet the real Katherine Parr was attractive, passionate, ambitious, and highly intelligent. Thirty-years-old (younger than Anne Boleyn had been) when she married the king, she was twice widowed and held hostage by the northern rebels during the great uprising of 1536-37 known as the Pilgrimage of Grace. Her life had been dramatic even before she became queen and it would remain so after Henryâ?™s death. She hastily and secretly married her old flame, the rakish Sir Thomas Seymour, and died shortly after giving birth to her only child in September 1548. Her brief happiness was undermined by the very public flirtation of her husband and step-daughter, Princess Elizabeth. She was one of the most influential and active queen consorts in English history, and this is her story.
  • I cannot recommend this book enough on Katherine. I learned a lot of new information about Katherine, Henry VIII's 6th and last wife. I will admit that my knowledge base on Katherine previous to this book was very small but I feel as though Ms. Porter rounded it out quite a bit. I had always known Katherine was widowed by the time of her marriage to Henry but I knew only that her 2nd husband was older than her. This book helped to illuminate what looks from the outside to have been a happy marriage with her second husband which I appreciated because I had always erroneously believed that she lived more as a nursemaid than a wife. This book also looks at her first marriage which I knew nothing about and from what I can tell from this book, there isn't a whole lot of information about as it was a rather short marriage due to her first husband's untimely death. I also really appreciated the author's look at Katherine and Henry's marriage. As with her 2nd husband, I had looked at their marriage as more of her being a nurse and companion to Henry than a traditional wife but Ms. Porter helped me to see that in all actuality they probably had a more traditional, and happy, relative to the time period, marriage. It was also very sweet to see that Katherine retained a good relationship with all of her step-children and that she seemed to be loved by almost all of them. This book is a very good biography of Katherine and helps to round out and fill in the gaps for those, like me, who don't know a whole lot about her. Ms. Porter's writing style is very engaging and never boring.

  • Katherine Parr is really an interesting figure - a woman who was ahead of her Tudor time. She was highly intelligent, well educated and well read - and she survived her oft married husband - Henry VIII.

    There has not been that much written about her life however - until now. This book is a really well written,thoroughly researched and utterly captivating glimpse into the life of this remarkable Queen. Linda Porter has a remarkable way with biographies. They come to life under her pen. I have been a life long fan of historical fiction - based on British history. Some time ago I decided that I wanted to fill in the fictitious gaps with non-fiction. This book reads as easily as fiction. It's a pleasure - not pedantic, not dry - but completely easy and pleasurable to read. It took me only a few days to read this book and it is a book that will remain in my collection.

    The book covers :
    The early life of Katherine Parr,
    Her two previous marriages (I had not heard much about the first before reading this book)
    How she made her way into Court life and how Henry decided to make her his sixth wife.
    Her relationship with Henry's three children and her own step-daughter from her second marriage (another fact that had not registered in my head before)
    How she narrowly missed being another statistic for murdered Queens of England.
    Her life after Henry's death.
    Life with Thomas Seymour and the kerfuffle with Princess Elizabeth and Thomas Seymour.
    Her death giving birth to her longed for child.

    This book covers it all and does so in a most enjoyable way. If you are an Anglophile as I am this book is, simply, a must read. It's a should read for anyone who enjoys biographies, British Royalty and British history.

  • ......a very intelligent, thoughtful, capable, and apparently attractive lady. I thought the book started off a bit slow and was not certain I quite appreciated the writing style, but I liked this more and more as it went on. Katherine is certainly presented here as a dutiful and devoted spouse, even to those first two that were not borne out of love. It seems here that she did have true affection and respect for Henry, perhaps even a kind of love, and that she was a true wife to him, despite so many previous accounts of her being a glorified nurse to an old and ill king. She acted with purpose and prudence in many ways as well as with duty and foresight and was evidently a committed religious reformer. This desire for and furthering of reform almost proved her undoing, as Henry truly seemed committed to a middle way and not a radical change, but she fearfully, and smartly, pulled back into the king's good graces...somewhat diminished but nevertheless forgiven and cherished it would seem. She would continue her writing following Henry's death and her commitment to religious reform. She finally marries for love, to the very interesting Thomas Seymour, brother of the Lord Protector, Edward Seymour. Katherine and Thomas don't, sadly, realize their goal of playing a critical part in the raising of King Edward and come to part following the birth of their daughter, Lady Mary Seymour. Very sad ending for these two. It was fascinating that following Henry's death, Katherine seemed to abandon some of her former prudence and propriety and to follow her heart into something that proved emotionally unsettling, uncertain, and finally, deadly. The strong suggestion here of dangerous impropriety involving her husband and the teenage Elizabeth (the future Elizabeth I of England) was almost shocking, I thought....it seemed very out of character for Katherine Parr. One wonders if she truly had any part in this wildly inappropriate and potentially ruinous liaison other than to be terribly anguished and angered by her husband's behavior. In any case, a great read for anyone interested in Tudor history...most enlightening. I am now ready to go forward and read Edward VI, the Lost King of England. Little is written about the short reign of Henry's son. I also plan to read Dr. Porter's first book, The Myth of "Bloody Mary," about Mary Tudor.