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ePub Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire download

by Elizabeth Speller

ePub Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire download
Author:
Elizabeth Speller
ISBN13:
978-0195176131
ISBN:
0195176138
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (October 14, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Historical
ePub file:
1458 kb
Fb2 file:
1362 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
234

Speller Elizabeth (EN).

Speller Elizabeth (EN). Yet the story of his reign is also a tale of intrigue, domestic discord, and murder. In Following Hadrian, Elizabeth Speller captures the fascinating life of Hadrian, ruler of the most powerful empire on earth at the peak of its glory.

Following Hadrian book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. One of the greatest-and most enigmatic-Roman emperors, Hadrian. Start by marking Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey Through the Roman Empire as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

It has provided the model for European empires from Charlemagne to Queen Victoria and beyond, and is still the basis of comparison for investigators of modern imperialisms.

Hadrian and the Cities of the Roman Empire and Hadrian and the City of Rome. Elizabeth Speller is a freelance writer and lecturer. She wrote the libretto to "Farewell," which was commissioned by Paul McCartney to commemorate his late wife Linda.

From the title I expected the whole book to be a travelogue of the philhellene Emperor Hadrian's many journeys through the empire. It also included biography and a psychological study of the man. Epigraphs began each chapter, alluding to the theme of each, then excerpts from the memoirs of Julia Balbilla, friend of Hadrian's disliked, if not hated, empress, Sabina. Julia accompanied them on their travels.

Following Hadrian : A Second-Century Journey Through the Roman Empire. by Elizabeth Speller. Elizabeth Speller put much thought and care into this book. Made me go to the internet to look for photos of the ruins she brought to life in Egypt and Tivoli

Following Hadrian : A Second-Century Journey Through the Roman Empire. Made me go to the internet to look for photos of the ruins she brought to life in Egypt and Tivoli. If you are slogging your way through Roman history, FOLLOWING HADRIAN will offer an oasis of information that reads like a novel and is unafraid to fill in the blanks. Speller Brings a Great but Flawed Emperor to Life. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 16 years ago. "Following Hadrian" is a quite compelling book.

Personal Name: Speller, Elizabeth. Publication, Distribution, et. Oxford ; New York. Oxford ; New York by Interpreting constitutions a comparative studyed. by Jeffrey Goldsworthy. 2. Obama from promise to power. by Obama from promise to powerDavid Mendell.

The soldiers watched over the frontier to the north and checked the people who wanted to enter or leave Roman Britain

After 6 years of hard work, the Wall was finished in 128. It was 117 kilometres long and about 4 metres high. The Wall was guarded by 15,000 Roman soldiers. The soldiers watched over the frontier to the north and checked the people who wanted to enter or leave Roman Britain. Those forts were called milecastles because the distance from one fort to another was one Roman mile (about 1,500 metres).

item 2 Following Hadrian: A Second-century Journey T. .Elizabeth Speller began a peripatetic life in Oxford, lived in Italy and finally settled in Roman Corinium - Cirencester.by Speller, Elizabeth Hardback. She has had a number of jobs from waitress to university teacher, having read Classics and then Ancient History at Cambridge as a mature student.

Hadrian’s long second century rule, from CE 117 to 138, signifies a Roman Golden Age, a period of prosperity . Elizabeth Speller, Following Hadrian: A Second-Century Journey through the Roman Empire (Oxford University Press, 2003).

Hadrian’s long second century rule, from CE 117 to 138, signifies a Roman Golden Age, a period of prosperity and peace managed astutely by a statesman-like emperor who believed in peace through strength but also accomplished what one poet and scholar has called a Greek renaissance. Previous articleThe crisis of the Roman Empire and colonate. Next articleFive good Emperors – Antonine Dynasty (96 – 192 AD). Mike Streich.

One of the greatest--and most enigmatic--Roman emperors, Hadrian stabilized the imperial borders, established peace throughout the empire, patronized the arts, and built an architectural legacy that lasts to this day: the great villa at Tivoli, the domed wonder of the Pantheon, and the eponymous wall that stretches across Britain. Yet the story of his reign is also a tale of intrigue, domestic discord, and murder. In Following Hadrian, Elizabeth Speller captures the fascinating life of Hadrian, ruler of the most powerful empire on earth at the peak of its glory. Speller displays a superb gift for narrative as she traces the intrigue of Hadrian's rise: his calculated marriage to Emperor Trajan's closest female relative, a woman he privately tormented; Trajan's suspicious deathbed adoption of Hadrian as his heir, a stroke some thought to be a post-mortem forgery; and the ensuing slaughter of potential rivals by an ally of Hadrian's. Speller makes brilliant use of her sources, vividly depicting Hadrian's bouts of melancholy, his intellectual passions, his love for a beautiful boy (whose death sent him into a spiral), and the paradox of his general policies of peace and religious tolerance even as he conducted a bitter, three-year war with Judea. Most important, the author captures the emperor as both a builder and an inveterate traveler, guiding readers on a grand tour of the Roman Empire at the moment of its greatest extent and accomplishment, from the barren, windswept frontiers of Britain to the teeming streets of Antioch, from the dangers of the German forest to the urban splendor of Rome itself.
  • Fascinating study of an emperor at the center of the roman world at the time of the Jewiish Wars, whose preference for men was very much an after thought far removed from his commanding presence as soldier, military general, politician, musician, architect, but yet still a flawed bon vivant of his times. I am waiting for the bio pic of his life...let's see, a good choice would be Antonio Banderas, or "Carlos" from "Desperate Housewives"...Hollywood, are you listening?

  • Following Hadrian gives us great insight into Rome during his Emperial time. It is a new insight to this often misunderstood Emperor who created in politics and architecture the Rome that most of us think of today. The author explores in depth the issues related to his great love and actually gives new insight to homosexual love in anciet Rome. One cannot read the book without also having great sympathy for his wife.

  • This book provides a good picture of Hadrian. It might have done better without the fictional inserts. These, while well written, could easily provide the basis for a full-blown historical novel - a kind of Capote-like approach.

  • Following Hadrian was interesting historically and kept my interest through the story interwoven through it. It gave an interesting perspective on the influences that made Hadrian act as he did.

  • I'm a big fan of Roman history and wanted to get into the head of this particular imperator with a unquenchable thirst to travel to the furthest reaches of his vast empire at a time when it was at its largest. I brought this book to the beach with me over the last few weeks and really enjoyed that not only does it do a thorough job of decribing Hadrian as a man, it gives you a fairly in depth perspective of the customs of the countries he visited nearly 1,900 years ago.

  • I read the entire book, but never felt like the author had gotten into Hadrian. I don't think this was the book she really meant to write.

  • I was looking for a book that would tell me more about Hadrian's Wall. I have been there, but I had read Ms. Speller's fiction books which have a background of the soldiers who maned the wall.

  • I liked the book because it was well written, too well written in some parts. Certain parts were particularly fascinating, notably the chapter prefaces presented as "From the memoirs of Julia Balbilla." These I found extremely interesting and sent me searching for more once I had finished with "Following Hadrian." Mentioned in the book nowhere is the fact that these, 'too well written' inclusions, were totally fictitious! Very disappointing! In the research I found Speller's inspiration for this book has to have been the 1951 book by Marguerite Yourcenar entitled "Memoirs of Hadrian" which Speller cites as a source. Another reimagined life of Hadrian because his personal memoirs no longer exist as a direct original source. So this book is a fictionalized and highly embellished info dump of reimagined Hadrian. There's too much made of Antinous and not nearly enough on Hadrian's tour of other parts of the Empire other than Egypt. I really liked her discussion of the buying power and wealth of Romans and their money. I enjoyed her coverage of the fall of Judea and the devastating economic effect of an emperor's journey through his empire. A recommended read with the right perspective going in.